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Posts Tagged ‘PHP’.

We are pleased to present below all posts tagged with ‘PHP’.

Inside The WordPress Toolbar

The WordPress Admin Bar, first introduced in version 3.1, debuted to mixed reactions. A Google search for “wordpress admin bar” returns multiple articles about how to disable or remove it. Version 3.2 of WordPress introduced new features and functionality, and version 3.3 has not only further enhanced it but integrated the header of the admin section into the bar itself.

Inside the WordPress Toolbar

Since this feature is not going anywhere and it figures largely in WordPress’ plan to implement front-end editing, I think we would all benefit from looking at where its features come from and how best to make this sometimes controversial feature work for us.


Create A Christmas Wish List With PHP (For Beginners)

’Tis the season to be jolly, and how much jollier could we make it than with a helpful Christmas wish list crafted for your family to ensure that you get maximum presentage this holiday? In this article, we will focus on creating a very simple system that allows you to add gift ideas to a Web page, and for your family (or whoever) to view the list.

Christmas Wish List With PHP

This tutorial is meant for beginners who already grasp HTML and CSS, know a bit of PHP and have seen phpMyAdmin before. I will not go into best practices, safety and all the rest of it; let’s just have fun with this one!


A Guide To PHP Error Messages For Designers

PHP is widely available with inexpensive hosting plans, which makes it a popular choice for developers who write software for the Web. From big platforms, such as WordPress, down to small scripts, such as ones to display image galleries or to send forms to email, thousands of script and products are out there written in PHP that can be installed and used even if you don’t know much about PHP yourself.

A Guide To PHP Error Messages For Designers

I have been a PHP developer for 10 years, and my company has developed a content management system, written in PHP, that is intended to be very simple to install and get started with. So, I spend a lot of time working with designers who are installing a PHP script for the first time. If you are installing a script and something goes wrong, PHP can be incredibly infuriating.


WordPress Multisite: Practical Functions And Methods

Multisite is a powerful new feature that arrived with the release of WordPress 3.0. It allows website managers to host multiple independent websites with a single installation of WordPress. Although each “website” in a network is independent, there are many ways to share settings, code and content throughout the entire network.

WordPress Multisite: Practical Functions And Methods

Since the beginning of the year, I’ve been developing themes and plugins for a WordPress Multisite-powered content network. During that time I’ve learned many powerful tips and tricks unique to Multisite. This guide will introduce you to a few Multisite-specific functions, along with real-world programming examples that you can begin using today. Hopefully, it will open your eyes to a few of the new possibilities available in Multisite.


Introduction To URL Rewriting

Many Web companies spend hours and hours agonizing over the best domain names for their clients. They try to find a domain name that is relevant and appropriate, sounds professional yet is distinctive, is easy to spell and remember and read over the phone, looks good on business cards and is available as a dot-com.


Or else they spend thousands of dollars to purchase the one they really want, which just happened to be registered by a forward-thinking and hard-to-find squatter in 1998. They go through all that trouble with the domain name but neglect the rest of the URL, the element after the domain name. It, too, should be relevant, appropriate, professional, memorable, easy to spell and readable. And for the same reasons: to attract customers and improve in search ranking.


How To Use AJAX In WordPress

In the last few years AJAX has creeped into websites and has slowly become THE way to create dynamic, user friendly and responsive websites. AJAX is the technology that lets you update the contents of a page without actually having to reload it in a browser. For example, Google Docs utilizes this technology when saving your work every few minutes.


While there are a number of ways to use AJAX in Wordpress = and all are correct in the loose sense of the word - there is a method which you should be using since WordPress supports it, it is future proof, very logical, and gives you numerous options right out of the box.


Getting Started With PHP Templating

In the early days of PHP applications, “spaghetti code” was a familiar sight. Fragments of PHP code were mixed in with HTML mark-up. There were no frameworks, so Web applications were just a bunch of source files. As the PHP language matured, developers started to think about the cleanliness and maintainability of their code. The model-view-controller (MVC) pattern was introduced.

MVC is a software architecture that allows for the separation of business logic from the user interface. In this architecture, the user sees and interacts with the view that, in the case of Web applications, is generated HTML code (along with JavaScript, CSS, images, etc.)


WordPress Essentials: Interacting With The WordPress Database

While many functions you already use in WordPress communicate with the database there is an easy and safe way to do this directly using the $wpdb class. Built on the great ezsql class by Justin Vincent, $wpdbwill allow you to address queries to any table in your database, and it will also help you handle the return data. Since this is built in WP functionality, there is no need to open a separate database connection (you would be duplicating code in this case), and there is no need to do hacks, like modifying a result set after it has been queried.

$wpdb class

In this article I will show you how to get started with the $wpdb class, how to retrieve data from your WordPress database and how to run more advanced queries which update or delete something in the db. The techniques here will remove some of the contraints that you run into with functions like get_posts() or wp_list_categories(), allowing you to tailor the queries you make to your specific needs. This method can also make your website more efficient by only getting the needed data, nothing more, nothing less.


Getting Started With The PayPal API

PayPal is the most popular platform for receiving online payments today. The ease of opening a PayPal account and receiving payments compared to opening a merchant account with a traditional payment gateway is probably the number one reason for its popularity, with a close second being the comprehensive API that PayPal provides for its payment services. In this post, I will break down some of the techniques and approaches to working with the PayPal API, in order to make integration and troubleshooting simpler and easier.

PayPal offers a variety of payment options, which might be confusing at first. Express Checkout is the premier PayPal service. Express Checkout allows you to receive payments without having a merchant account and without having to meet special requirements other than verifying your account (either via a bank account or a credit card).


My Favorite Programming Mistakes

Over my programming career, I have made a lot of mistakes in several different languages. In fact, if I write 10 or more lines of code and it works the first time, I’ll get a bit suspicious and test it more rigorously than usual. I would expect to find a syntax error or a bad array reference or a misspelled variable or something.

My Favourite Programming Mistakes

I like to classify these mistakes into three broad groups: cock-ups (or screw-ups in American English), errors and oversights. A cock-up is when you stare blankly at the screen and whisper “Oops”: things like deleting a database or website, or overwriting three-days worth of work, or accidentally emailing 20,000 people. Errors cover everything, from simple syntax errors like forgetting a } to fatal errors and computational errors.


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