Posts Tagged ‘PHP’

We are pleased to present below all posts tagged with ‘PHP’.

How To Modify A Default Joomla 1.5 Template

Joomla is a popular open-source content management system with a lot of possibilities. One of the strengths of Joomla is the vast number of extensions and templates available, both free and commercial. You can download and install a template in a few simple steps, although some templates are included in the Joomla installation package, and most users start with one of those. This article takes you through one of the default Joomla 1.5 templates and shows you how to modify it for your website.

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Joomla 1.6, which was released earlier this year, has a different way of handling templates. For instance, it introduced the concept of template styles. However, many users are still on Joomla 1.5. Thus, the information in this post will be valid to many Joomla users. Also, the techniques used in this post can be applied to Joomla 1.6 and later versions even if the template structure is somewhat different.

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How To Build A Media Site On WordPress (Part 2)

The default "category" and "tag" taxonomies in WordPress offer a lot of flexibility to those with imagination and in my development experience I have seen a wide range of creative implementations. With the introduction of custom taxonomies and their growing ease of use, though, we need no longer be bound to categories and tags. With the ability to create both hierarchical and non-hierarchical taxonomies and with the introduction of several new features in WordPress 3.1, now is the time, if you're not already, to begin putting custom taxonomies to use.

How To Build A Media Site On WordPress (Part 2)

In part one of this two part series, we learned how to setup custom post types and custom taxonomies. We also learned how to build a template to check for and display media attached to custom posts. Now, we'll learn how to use custom taxonomy templates to organize and relate our media. Let's get started!

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How To Build A Media Site On WordPress (Part 1)

WordPress is amazing. With its growing popularity and continual development, it is becoming the tool of choice for many designers and developers. WordPress projects, though, are pushing well beyond the confines of mere "posts" and "pages". How do you go about adding and organizing media and all its complexities? With the introduction of WordPress 3.1, several new features were added that make using WordPress to manage media even more practical and in this tutorial, we're going to dive in and show you how.

In part one, we're going to setup custom post types and custom taxonomies, without plugins. After that, we'll build a template to check for and display media attached to custom posts. Then, in part two, we'll use custom taxonomy templates to organize and relate media (and other types of content).

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New WordPress Power Tips For Template Developers And Consultants

It has been a big year for WordPress. If there were still some lingering doubts about its potency as a full-fledged content management system, then the full support for custom taxonomies and custom post types in WordPress 3.0 core should have put them to rest. WordPress 3.1 took those leaps one step further, polishing custom taxonomies with multi-taxonomy query support, polishing custom post types with native template support for archives and feeds, and introducing features (like the “admin bar”) that make it easier to quickly edit and add content from the front end.

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In the broader community, we’ve seen incredible plug-in suites such as BuddyPress mature, and even the emergence of independent WordPress-dedicated hosting services, such as page.ly. To celebrate WordPress’s progress, let’s review some new tips that can help template developers and consultants up their game even further.

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Image Manipulation With jQuery & PHP GD

One of the numerous advantages brought about by the explosion of jQuery and other JavaScript libraries is the ease with which you can create interactive tools for your site. When combined with server-side technologies such as PHP, this puts a serious amount of power at your finger tips.

Image Manipulation With jQuery and PHP GD

In this article, I’ll be looking at how to combine JavaScript/jQuery with PHP and, particularly, PHP’s GD library to create an image manipulation tool to upload an image, then crop it and finally save the revised version to the server. Sure, there are plugins out there that you can use to do this; but this article aims to show you what's behind the process. You can download the source files for reference.

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Ten Things Every WordPress Plugin Developer Should Know

Plugins are a major part of why WordPress powers millions of blogs and websites around the world. The ability to extend WordPress to meet just about any need is a powerful motivator for choosing WordPress over other alternatives. Having written several plugins myself, I've come to learn many (but certainly not all) of the ins-and-outs of WordPress plugin development, and this article is a culmination of the things I think every WordPress plugin developer should know. Oh, and keep in mind everything you see here is compatible with WordPress 3.0+.

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The first thing you should do when developing a WordPress plugin is to enable debugging, and I suggest leaving it on the entire time you're writing plugin code. When things go wrong, WordPress raises warnings and error messages, but if you can’t see them then they might as well have not been raised at all. Enabling debugging also turns on WordPress notices, which is important because that's how you'll know if you're using any deprecated functions.

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Keeping Web Users Safe By Sanitizing Input Data

In my last article, I spoke about several common mistakes that show up in web applications. Of these, the one that causes the most trouble is insufficient input validation/sanitization. In this article, I'm joined by my colleague Peter (evilops) Ellehauge in looking at input filtering in more depth while picking on a few real examples that we've seen around the web. As you'll see from the examples below, insufficient input validation can result in various kinds of code injection including XSS, and in some cases can be used to phish user credentials or spread malware.

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To start with, we'll take an example[1] from one of the most discussed websites today. This example is from a site that hosts WikiLeaks material. Note that the back end code presented is not the actual code, but what we think it might be based on how the exploit works. The HTML was taken from their website. We think it's fair to assume that it's written in PHP as the form's action is index.php.

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What To Do When Your Website Goes Down

Have you ever heard a colleague answer the phone like this: "Good afterno… Yes… What? Completely?… When did it go down?… Really, that long?… We'll look into it right away… Yes, I understand… Of course… Okay, speak to you soon… Bye." The call may have been followed by some cheesy ’80s rock ballad coming from the speaker phone, interrupted by "Thank you for holding. You are now caller number 126 in the queue." That's your boss calling the hosting company's 24 hour "technical support" line.

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An important website has gone down, and sooner or later, heads will turn to the Web development corner of the office, where you are sitting quietly, minding your own business, regretting that you ever mentioned "Linux" on your CV. You need to take action. Your company needs you. Your client needs you. Here's what to do.

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Common Security Mistakes in Web Applications

Web application developers today need to be skilled in a multitude of disciplines. It's necessary to build an application that is user friendly, highly performant, accessible and secure, all while executing partially in an untrusted environment that you, the developer, have no control over. I speak, of course, about the User Agent. Most commonly seen in the form of a web browser, but in reality, one never really knows what's on the other end of the HTTP connection.

http://xkcd.com/327/

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There are many things to worry about when it comes to security on the Web. Is your site protected against denial of service attacks? Is your user data safe? Can your users be tricked into doing things they would not normally do? Is it possible for an attacker to pollute your database with fake data? Is it possible for an attacker to gain unauthorized access to restricted parts of your site? Unfortunately, unless we're careful with the code we write, the answer to these questions can often be one we'd rather not hear.

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PHP: What You Need To Know To Play With The Web

In this article, I'll introduce you to the fundamentals of PHP. We'll focus on using PHP to access Web services and on turning static HTML pages into dynamic ones by retrieving data from the Web and by showing different content depending on what the user has entered in a form or requested in the URL. You won't come out a professional PHP developer, but you'll be well on your way to building a small page that uses Web services. You can find a lot of great PHP info on the Web, and most of the time you will end up on PHP.net itself. But I was asked repeatedly on several hack days and competitions to write this quick introduction article, so here it is.

PHP rendered in a browser

PHP is a server-side language that has become a massive success for three reasons: it is a very easy and forgiving language. Variables can be anything, and you can create them anytime you want. It is part of the free LAMP stack (Linux, Apache, MySQL, PHP) and thus available on almost any server you can rent on the Web. And it does not need a special editor, environment or build process. All you do is create a file of the .php file type, mix PHP and HTML and then put it on your server for rendering.

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