Posts Tagged ‘Responsive Web Design’

We are pleased to present below all posts tagged with ‘Responsive Web Design’.

How To Keep Framework Development Simple And Bug-Free

It's just like that for your product, too: people rely on our products to work. Bugs erode trust, which in turn loses customers. So when we began updating Foundation, a responsive CSS framework, we wanted to ensure everything worked. Thoroughly. We know that many people rely on our software for their work, and maintaining that trust is paramount.

How We Keep Foundation Development Simple, Real And Bug-Free

In this article you'll learn our methodology for testing responsively, not just on a case by case, page-from-PSD comp. See, we've developed a certain system to make sure that nothing's broken at launch on different devices.

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Browser Input Events: Can We Do Better Than The Click?

Responding to user input is arguably the core of what we do as interface developers. In order to build responsive web products, understanding how touch, mouse, pointer and keyboard actions and the browser work together is key. You have likely experienced the 300-millisecond delay in mobile browsers or wrestled with touchmove versus scrolling.

Browser Input Events: Can We Do Better Than The Click?

In this article we will introduce the event cascade and use this knowledge to implement a demo of a tap event that supports the many input methods while not breaking in proxy browsers such as Opera Mini.

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A Few Different Ways To Use SVG Sprites In Animation

There are some things we know and like about SVGs. First, SVGs have smooth, clean edges on any display, so using SVGs can reduce the number of HTTP requests for image replacement. Second, it’s easy to make an SVG scalable to its container for responsive development.

A Few Different Ways To Use SVG Sprites In Animation

In this article we’ll cover a few ways of using SVG sprites to describe motion on the web. I’ll show some techniques for using SVG sprites in complex animation that takes advantage of these factors. All examples shown will assume the use of an auto-prefixer and some basic knowledge of CSS animations.

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RICG Responsive Images For WordPress

I recently teamed up with Mat Marquis of the Responsive Images Community Group to help integrate responsive images into the WordPress platform. We decided to refactor a plugin that I had built several months ago, hoping that it would lead to a more useable and performant solution.

RICG Responsive Images For WordPress

After months of pull requests, conversations on Slack and help from WordPress’ core team, we’re finally ready to share what we’ve been working on. You can download and install RICG Responsive Images from WordPress’ plugin directory, while keeping track of our development progress on GitHub.

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Design Last

How does one design and develop for the responsive web? A lot of methodologies out there try to tackle this problem, but all of them rely on the same classic website development process. It boils down to the following: design and then develop.

Design Last

Let’s go nuts and flip this outdated methodology on its head. Before we start flipping things around, let’s take a quick stroll down memory lane, just so we know where we’ve come from and where we are now.

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Chartist.js, An Open-Source Library For Responsive Charts

The list of charting libraries for the web is already quite long, and you might ask yourself why we would need to make it any longer. Whenever you need to develop an application’s dashboard, embed some usage statistics or simply visualize some data, you will find yourself looking for a charting library that fits your needs.

Chartist.js, An Open Source Library For Responsive Charts

Chartist was developed for a very particular need: to create simple responsive charts. While other charting libraries do a great job of visualizing data, something is always missing to satisfy this simple yet demanding need.

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Improving Smashing Magazine’s Performance: A Case Study

Today Smashing Magazine turns eight years old. Eight years is a long time on the web, yet for us it really doesn't feel like a long journey at all. Things have changed, evolved and moved on, and we gratefully take on new challenges one at a time. To mark this special little day, we’d love to share a few things that we’ve learned over the last year about the performance challenges of this very website and about the work we’ve done recently. If you want to craft a fast responsive website, you might find a few interesting nuggets worth considering. – Ed.

Improving Smashing Magazine's Performance: A Case Study

Improvement is a matter of steady, ongoing iteration. When we redesigned Smashing Magazine back in 2012, our main goal was to establish trustworthy branding that would reflect the ambitious editorial direction of the magazine. We did that primarily by focusing on crafting a delightful reading experience. Over the years, our focus hasn't changed a bit; however, that very asset that helped to establish our branding turned into a major performance bottleneck.

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