Posts Tagged ‘Responsive Web Design’

We are pleased to present below all posts tagged with ‘Responsive Web Design’.

Breakpoints And The Future Of Websites

When the iPhone came out in 2007, the demonstration of its web browser by the late great Steve Jobs gave the not-so-subtle impression that Apple wasn’t too perturbed about its users pinching to zoom and swiping to scroll as part of the browsing experience. Responsive web design aimed to solve this problem by smartly applying flexible grids, fluid layouts and, of course, media queries.

Breakpoints And The Future Of Websites

However, responsive web design has turned out to be somewhat of a case study in the law of unintended consequences, with one of the perverse unanticipated effects being breakpoint paranoia. But even without the undue influence that media queries exerts on your selection of these breakpoints, it dawns on you after much introspection that these might not be the droids we’re looking for.

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Team Collaboration And Closing Efficiency Gaps In Responsive Design

Responsive design ushers in complexities that require a more involved design and implementation process. Because of this, the effort has piled up on the front end. Working in silos, where you talk to each other only occasionally or during scheduled meetings, has too many unknowns. Let's look at how these new challenges create opportunities to work together better.

Team Collaboration And Closing Efficiency Gaps In Responsive Design

We have to kill the mentality that there is an assembly line of workers waiting for it to be their turn, and instead embrace more focused collaboration across the project’s entire team.

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Responsive Images Done Right: A Guide To <picture> And srcset

On Monday, we published an article on Picturefill 2.0, a perfect polyfill for responsive images. Today's article complements Tim Wright's article and explains exactly how we can use the upcoming <picture> element and srcset, with simple fallbacks for legacy browsers. There is no reason to wait for responsive images; we can actually have them very, very soon. — Ed.

Responsive Images Done Right: A Guide To <picture> And srcset

Images are some of the most important pieces of information on the web, but over the web’s 25-year history, they haven’t been very adaptable at all. Everything about them has been stubbornly fixed: their size, format and crop, all set in stone by a single src.

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Picturefill 2.0: Responsive Images And The Perfect Polyfill

Not since the early days of web standards have I seen our community rally around a seemingly small issue: responsive images. Over the last four years (yeah, it’s been about four years), we’ve seen many permutations of images in responsive design.

Responsive Images And The Perfect Polyfill

From the lazier days of setting max-width: 100% (the absolute minimum you should be doing) to more full-featured JavaScript implementations, such as Picturefill and Zurb’s data-interchange method, we’ve spent a lot of time spinning our wheels, banging our heads and screaming at the wall. I’m happy to say that our tireless journey is coming to a close. The W3C and browser makers got the hint.

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Responsive Design Begins With The URL

The BBC’s Programmes website is huge, and is intended to be a rolling archive of everything that the BBC broadcasts on television and radio. Originally released in 2007, it now has pages for over 1.6 million episodes, but that’s barely half of the story. Surrounding those episodes is a wealth of content, including clips, galleries, episode guides, character profiles and much more, plus Programme’s newly responsive home pages.

Responsive Design Begins With The URL

The new responsive home pages, known as “brand” pages, join the schedule and A–Z lists in a broader responsive rebuild. 39% of users (and growing) now use mobile and tablet devices to visit these pages; so, making the pages responsive was the best way to serve a great experience to everybody while keeping the website maintainable.

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Building The Web App For Unicef’s Tap Campaign: A Case Study

Since a smartphone landed in almost everyone’s pocket, developers have been faced with the question of whether to go with a mobile website or a native app. Native applications offer the smoothest and most feature-rich user experience in almost every case. They have direct access to the GPU, making layer compositions and pixel movements buttery-smooth.

Building

Native applications also provide native UI frameworks that end users are familiar with, and they take care of the low-level aspects of UI development that developers don’t have time to deal with. When eschewing an app in favor of a mobile website, developers often sacrifice user experience, deep native integration and a complex UI in favor of SEO and accessibility.

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How To Plan Your Next Mobile E-Commerce Website

The O’Neill Clothing store had a nearly 600% revenue increase from going responsive, and Skinny Ties saw a 377.6% increase in revenue for iPhones after going responsive as well. Even Think Tank Photo’s transactions on smartphones and tablets increased by more than 96%... go figure!

How To Plan Your Next Mobile E-Commerce Website

In this article, we’ll walk through all of the vital steps when planning a highly converting mobile e-commerce website. The most important questions you need to ask are:

  1. Who are we building this mobile website for?
  2. How will we measure conversion success?
  3. What design factors affect mobile e-commerce conversion rates?
  4. What is the ideal product page?

Let's get started.

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