Posts Tagged ‘Responsive Web Design’

We are pleased to present below all posts tagged with ‘Responsive Web Design’.

Think Again: Assumptions About Mobile To Reconsider

The popularity of mobile has skyrocketed over the past few years. We've seen six generations of iPhones, five iPad models, hundreds of Android phones and thousands of different devices being manufactured.

Assumptions About Mobile To Reconsider

Design and development have gone all the way from static and desktop-centric to responsive and device-aware. And it has been a very exciting journey. The field is relatively young — we are all learning (usually by mistakes). Because of that, we are also struggling with generalizations and even stereotypes.

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Performance & RWDImplementing Off-Canvas Navigation For A Responsive Website

The varying viewports that our websites encounter on a daily basis continue to demand more from responsive design. Not only must we continue to tackle the issues of content choreography — the art of maintaining order and context throughout the chaotic ebb and flow of the Web browser — but we must also meet the expectations of users.

Implementing Off-Canvas Navigation For A Responsive Website

They’re not sitting still. With the likes of Firefox OS (Boot to Gecko), Chrome OS and now Ubuntu for phones — an OS that makes “Web apps” first-class citizens — delivering native app-like experiences on the Web may become a necessity if users begin to expect it.

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Mobile Design’s Wake-Up CallPreparing Websites For The Unexpected

Designing websites for smartphones is easy compared to retrofitting those already in place. More than that, it’s embarrassing how, almost eight years after CSS gained practical acceptance, a lack of foresight haunts those of us who write HTML.

Preparing Websites For The Unexpected

Converting older websites to responsive design causes headaches not because small screens are difficult, but because most HTML documents were written under an assumption about screen size.

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Bandwidth Media Queries? We Don’t Need ’Em!

From time to time, when a discussion is taking place about ways to implement responsive images, someone comes along and says, “Hey, guys! What we really need is a media query that enables us to send high-resolution images to people on a fast connection and low-resolution images to people on a slow connection.” At least early on, a lot of people agreed.

Media query download tests

At first glance, this makes a lot of sense. High-resolution images have a significant performance cost, because they take longer to download. On a slow network connection, that cost can have a negative impact on the user’s experience.

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Making Advertising Work In A Responsive World

Advertising has always had an uneasy relationship with the media because of ethical considerations on both sides of the printing press. On the one hand, journalists are reluctant, quite rightly, to be seen as under the thumb of an advertiser, and on the other side, advertisers don’t want to be seen to be enforcing their views on the free press.

Making Advertising Work In A Responsive World

The relationship between the media and marketeers is the greatest sham marriage of all time: convenience, rarely love. We need each other. Writers need to be paid, and people making products need to be paid too. That being said, the journalism profession has been somewhat eager to hand a lot of control of their content to advertisers for some time now.

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Device-Independent Design StrategyLooking Beyond Common Media Query Breakpoints

With all the talk about responsive Web design, designers and coders are moving even further from the fixed pixel layouts of design’s print-based history. We’re finally thinking in terms of fluid layouts and expandable, interactive content. But when you get down to it, we’re still thinking of the fluidity in terms of desktop, tablet and mobile sizes.

Looking Beyond Common Media Query Breakpoints

Chances are that your responsive websites have media query breakpoints at precisely the tablet and mobile widths, essentially creating three different versions of a website with the same code. While this is much more ideal than what we’ve all done until now, it’s not always the best way to approach things. Often, our content breakpoints (the viewport widths where content should be reformatted) are different from common device breakpoints (the viewport widths that reflect physical devices).

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Coding Q&A With Chris CoyierSVG Fallback, Vertical Rhythm, CSS Project Structure

Howdy, folks! Welcome to more Smashing Magazine CSS Q&A. It works like this: you send in questions you have about CSS, and at least once a month we’ll pick out the best questions and answer them so that everyone can benefit from the exchange.

Coding Q&A With Chris Coyier: SVG Fallback, Vertical Rhythm, CSS Project Structure

Your question could be about a very specific problem you're having, or it could even be a question about a philosophical approach. We’ll take all kinds. If you're interested in exploring more Q&A, there's a bunch more in my author archive.

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