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Posts Tagged ‘Reviews’.

We are pleased to present below all posts tagged with ‘Reviews’.

Review Of Cross-Browser Testing Tools

At some point in the future, the way that all major browsers render Web code will likely be standardized, which will make testing across multiple browsers no longer necessary as long as the website is coded according to Web standards. But because that day is still a way off (if it will really come at all), testing your design the advanced browsers as well as legacy browsers is a necessary part of any project.


The old-school way to test code was to load your website on as many computers as you could find, using as many different combinations of browsers and operating systems as possible. That was fine if you had access to a bunch of different computers (and had some time to kill). But there are much more efficient ways to test across browsers, using either free or commercial Web services and software. In this article we review some of the most useful ones.


7 Version Control Systems Reviewed

If you’ve ever collaborated with other people on a project, you know the frustration of constantly swapping files. Some do it by email, some through file upload services and some by other methods. It’s a pain in the neck, and every designer and developer knows it. Revision control is an excellent way to combat the problem of sharing files between workers.

Most web-developers have probably worked with some sort of revision control system, but designers may find it a foreign concept. The most obvious benefit of using revision control is the ability to have an unlimited number of people working on the same code base, without having to constantly send files back and forth.


But designers and developers can both benefit from using revision control systems to keep copies of their files and designs. You can instantly browse previous “commits” to your repository and revert to earlier versions if something happens.

This article reviews some of the top open-source version control systems and tools that setting up a version control system easy.


25 Font Management Tools Reviewed

If you are one of those people who work with fonts on regular basis, then choosing, comparing and analyzing fonts is a serious business for you. Font management is not always as easy as a walk on the cake. Font management issues like installing and uninstalling fonts, handling missing fonts, taking care of font conflicts always keep graphic designers and typographers on their toes.


Also hundreds or thousands of fonts activated on the system can use up considerable amount of system resources which in turn reduces efficiency and productivity. Mac, Windows and Linux platforms have their own font management utilities, but these utilities are not sufficient in a specialized or professional environment. This is where professional font management tools come to the rescue.

Below we have reviewed 25 free/commercial font managers for Mac, Windows and Linux. Which one do you use and why? Your favourite tool is missing? Let us know in the comments!


10 Weblog Engines Reviewed

Choosing blogging software can be a scary process, especially if you are new to blogging. There are many different types of engines and content management systems (CMS) that could be used. Picking the software that you’ll need is not an easy task, given the wide variety and types on the Web today.


There are many different aspects to consider when choosing which blogging software to pick. For instance:

Programming language. Many blog platforms run on either PHP or Rails, but you can find just about any flavor of programming language you are looking for.

What features you’ll need. The type of software you might choose is very dependent on the type of blog you are going to run. Some blog software is geared more towards new users, while others are more developer and designer friendly. It’s a matter of finding software based on the features you need.


15 Desktop Blogging Tools Reviewed

Desktop blogging tools can benefit designers-bloggers in a number of ways. They provide extra functionality that can significantly speed up the blogging process for both newbies and professionals.

One of the main benefits of using a desktop client is the ability to comfortably write a post offline, and then publish later. Many clients also come with a scheduled post feature, so you can define what time you would like to publish your articles. Some editors provide a spell checker, drafts saver, remote publishing and WYSIWYG-editor with advanced formatting options such as inserting media or structuring the post — they may be hard to deal with using standard online blogging-engines.


Let's take a look at 15 desktop blogging editors which can speed up the blogging process. Some are free and some cost a few dollars, but in the end any of these editors can greatly help a blogger, regardless of skill level.


CSS Editors Reviewed

We continue to review text and source editors for designers and web-developers. After a thorough consideration of WYSIWIG- and source code editors now it's time to take a closer look at applications for advanced CSS-coding. Reason: while numerous HTML-editors offer more or less advanced CSS-support there are also allround-CSS-editors which offer a sophisticated integrated development environment for CSS-coding.

Of course, real CSS ninjas accept nothing but a minimalistic Notepad or some sophisticated source code-editor. In fact, CSS-editors are often considered to be unnecessary and superflous — after all, you can do the same in your favourite text editor. And sometimes this is true — while there are some really bad HTML-editors there are also some even worse CSS-editors. Particularly code autocompletion tools are extremely good at bloating the code to extremes, making the resulting stylesheet unnecessary complex and hard to maintain. Why would someone purchase a CSS-editor to raise the maintenance costs afterwards?

CSS Editor Screenshot

Yet CSS-editors can be helpful; furthermore, you can effectively use them in different settings by developers with different skills. Web professionals can use a CSS-editor to improve workflow and get all useful CSS-tools provided by one single application. Newbies can easier learn CSS by analzying stylesheets and using live-editing to understand how the design is built up and what is actually going on behind the scenes. In either case you should make sure you know what you are doing and not end up producing quick'n'dirty stylesheet.

This post presents an overview of 15 established or rather unknown CSS-editors; you’ll probably find “usual suspects” — your favourite editor or the editor you’ve once been working with. But you’ll also find some rather unknown alternatives which are definitely worth considering when choosing an optimal source code editor.


35 Useful Source Code Editors Reviewed

To edit HTML- and CSS-code you only need a simple plaintext-editor — the rest depends on your skills and your creativity. However, to make your life a little bit easier, you can use some more comfortable source-code editors with advanced editing features. These features can effectively support you during coding, debugging and testing. Powerful modern editors provide developers with syntax highlighting, diff, macros, plugins, code-snippets, preview-option and an integrated FTP-management tool. Some editors go even further and offer a complete integrated development environment with numerous features and functions.


In the list below we present an overview of 35 established or rather unknown — but useful source code-editors; you'll probably find "usual suspects" — your favourite editor or the editor you've once been working with. But you'll also find some rather unknown alternatives which are definitely worth considering when choosing an optimal source code editor.

Some of the "ancient" text-editors such as EMacs or Vi are still alive and have achieved a remarkable level of quality over years. We've presented them below proving that sometimes it is really better to consider preferring a rather old editor to a "fresh" one. The position of the editors in the list is rather random and doesn't necessarily correspond to our personal evaluation of the editors. Please notice: even although this overview presents quite many editors, it doesn't mention all of them.

Yesterday we've published a review of 25 WYSIWYG-editors. Now, what about useful source code editors? What is your favourite?


25 Useful WYSIWYG Editors Reviewed

When it comes to coding editors, it's damn hard to a get a clear overview of all the benefits and functionalities different editors have to offer. However, in the end everybody needs one, so it's important to know which editor is best tailored to your personal needs.

WYSIWYG-editors are often criticized by real coding ninjas for bloated, dirty and not standards-complaint source code they've been producing over the last years. However, WYSIWYG-editors have become much better recently. Some of them even produce valid and elegant code.


Sometimes you need to provide your clients with some simple tools to edit or update their web-sites. And this is where the utility of WYSIWYG-editors comes in. As a web-professional you need to provide your clients with some sophisticated advice and offer a simple yet effective tool — e.g. a WYSIWYG-editor. In this article we've tried to give you an overview of both useful and deprecated WYSIWYG-editors.


Interesting Web Browsers You Have Never Heard Of

There are more browsers than you are probably aware of. Apart from Firefox, Opera and Internet Explorer there is a number of promising alternatives which can improve your flexibility, increase your productivity and enrich your browsing experience.

In fact, there are over 100 existing (although not widely used) browser applications. Most of them make use of the rendering engines Trident (Internet Explorer), Gecko (Mozilla Firefox), WebCore (Safari) and Presto (Opera 7 and above). However, some of them offer large fields for experiments and exploration — e.g. 3D Engines, but also really useful browsers with advanced functionalities such as desktop-tools integration.

Recently we've selected over 20 Win/Mac/Linux-browsers, installed most of them, tested them, compared them and now present the results below. Let's take a closer look at some rather unknown, forgotten, advanced or experimental browsers. What else do we have on the horizon? What should we use? And what might we be willing to use? Apparently, between Firefox, Opera and Internet Explorer there is enough room for creative and unusual approaches.

Screenshot Browser

Please note that

  • we've tried to showcase only those browsers that use Gecko or WebCore layout engine, but we present some interesting Trident-based applications as well;
  • it wasn't our intention to display all available browsers such as Swiftweasel and Midori. We've selected the ones we've found most useful and promising.
This is Swiftweasel, an optimized build of the Mozilla Firefox web browser for Linux.

(X)HTML/CSS Coding-Services

You don't have to do everything by yourself. If you are running out of time or simply aren't that enthusiastic about the coding process, you might be willing to consider special "coding services" to get your job done in time. Particularly since there are dozens of such services, the price is usually quite reasonable and worth the time you save, headaches you avoid and further projects you can keep working on. However, whether the result is sophisticated or not, is the matter of personal experience - at least it should be.

The companies and designers listed below do not design web-sites; instead they convert drafts and sketches (mostly in the Photoshop-format, .psd) into the (X)HTML-Code (with CSS-styling). The prices depend on the desired processing time. The faster you'd like to get the work done, the more expensive the coding will be. Some service providers offer optional extras - for instance, AJAX-Scripting and further interactivity.


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