Posts Tagged ‘Ruby on Rails’

We are pleased to present below all posts tagged with ‘Ruby on Rails’.

How To Build A Ruby Gem With Bundler, Test-Driven Development, Travis CI And Coveralls, Oh My!

Ruby is a great language. It was designed to foster happiness and productivity in developers, all the while providing tools that are effective and yet focused on simplicity.

How To Build A Ruby Gem With Bundler, Test-Driven Development, Travis CI And Coveralls, Oh My!

One of the tools available to the Rubyist is the RubyGems package manager. It enables us both to include “gems” (i.e. packaged code) that we can reuse in our own applications and to package our own code as a gem to share with the Ruby community. We’ll be focusing on the latter in this article.

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A Beginner’s Guide To Ruby

Ruby is an object-oriented language. What does that even mean? It has unique quirks and characteristics that we’ll explain clearly. This article assumes that you have no programming experience, not even HTML.

A Beginners Guide to Ruby

An important skill to have when creating a program is translating — translating the desires of the user into the output they are looking for. In order to do that, you have to be able to think like a developer so that you can take what you know instinctively (as a user) and morph it into what the computer needs to be able to do what you want. So, we’ll help you start thinking like a developer. When you are done, you should have a mental model of how Ruby works and be on your way to becoming a successful Rubyista.

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A Guide To Starting Your Own Rails Engine Gem

Since Rails 3 was released, developers have been writing Rails engines in a new clean style that can be packaged as RubyGems. A Rails engine is a prepackaged application that is able to be run or mounted within another Rails application. An engine can have its own models, views, controllers, generators and publicly served static files.

Now, unless you like writing a lot of code, this is great news, because it means you can write an engine once and use it over and over again. Let’s say you build a lot of websites for small businesses. A common requirement for such websites is a page listing all of the employees at a company and some basic information about them. This is a great candidate for a Rails engine gem because the functionality will change very little and can be abstracted to a common set of requirements.

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Set Up An Ubuntu Local Development Machine For Ruby On Rails

So, you want to develop Ruby on Rails applications? While loads of (introductory) tutorials are available for developing Ruby on Rails applications, there seems to be some uncertainty about setting up a lean and up-to-date local development environment.

Set Up An Ubuntu Local Development Machine For Ruby On Rails

This tutorial will guide you through the steps of setting up an Ubuntu local development machine for Ruby on Rails. Part 2 of this tutorial, which will be published here later, will help you through the steps to set up an Ubuntu VPS. For now, knowing that VPS stands for virtual private server is sufficient. It will be able to host your newly developed Ruby on Rails applications. But let’s focus on the local development machine first.

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Successful Freelancing With Ruby On Rails: Workflow, Techniques And Tools

A freelancer is a self-employed person who pursues a profession without a long-term commitment to any particular employer. Your curiosity in this opportunity was probably sparked by posts marked "Freelance" or "Work from anywhere" on the myriad of job boards around the Web. Freelancing is equal parts freedom and responsibility. While you have the freedom to choose when you work, where you work and what you work on, you are also responsible for everything: deadlines, finding work, the quality of your work, communication and so much more.

Rails Guides

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Ruby, with all of its frameworks and libraries (such as Rails, Merb and Sinatra), is a practical tool to use in your freelance Web development career because of its focus on clean code, object-oriented syntax, efficient development practices and strong community (whether a simple IRC chat room or large conference). For all of these reasons, I find that it is also quite fun to use and exciting to be a part of.

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How To Automate Optimization and Deployment Of Static Content

A lot of traffic between users and your site comes from the static content you’re using to set up the user interface, namely layout graphics, Stylesheets and Javascript files.

Before optimization

This article shows a method to improve the providing of static content for a web platform. Further, it will show you a way to automate the deployment of these files, so you can deliver them with least effort but with maximum performance. This tutorial will take some time to set it up, but it’s going to save you hours of work in the future and will improve your page speed significantly.

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Beginner’s Guide To Ruby On Rails: Part 2

Last week we published Getting Started With Ruby On Rails, the first part of our Ruby On Rails introduction. We explained basic ideas behind Ruby and presented concepts and essential components of the language. In this article you'll learn more about Rails, you will learn how to get Ruby on Rails running on your computer, and get an overview of the basic functionality of Rails and demonstrate how Rails’ main parts work together.

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I assume you're already familiar with some other form of Web development, whether PHP, Python, Perl or Java, and relational databases like MySQL. First, we'll introduce Rails and Ruby and the basic ideas behind both. I'll teach you just enough Ruby so that you understand the code samples. I'll tell you how to get Ruby on Rails running on your computer, and I'll give you an overview of the basic functionality of Rails and demonstrate how Rails' main parts work together.

After reading these parts, you should have an idea of whether Rails is for you. If you get the feeling that it is, I'll point you to some good tutorials on the Web that you can use to learn Rails. I'll also provide a lot of further reading recommendations so you can dig as deep into the topic as you like.

You may want to take a look at the following related posts:

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