Posts Tagged ‘Ruby on Rails’

We are pleased to present below all posts tagged with ‘Ruby on Rails’.

Beginner’s Guide To Ruby On Rails: Part 2

Last week we published Getting Started With Ruby On Rails, the first part of our Ruby On Rails introduction. We explained basic ideas behind Ruby and presented concepts and essential components of the language. In this article you'll learn more about Rails, you will learn how to get Ruby on Rails running on your computer, and get an overview of the basic functionality of Rails and demonstrate how Rails’ main parts work together.

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I assume you're already familiar with some other form of Web development, whether PHP, Python, Perl or Java, and relational databases like MySQL. First, we'll introduce Rails and Ruby and the basic ideas behind both. I'll teach you just enough Ruby so that you understand the code samples. I'll tell you how to get Ruby on Rails running on your computer, and I'll give you an overview of the basic functionality of Rails and demonstrate how Rails' main parts work together.

After reading these parts, you should have an idea of whether Rails is for you. If you get the feeling that it is, I'll point you to some good tutorials on the Web that you can use to learn Rails. I'll also provide a lot of further reading recommendations so you can dig as deep into the topic as you like.

You may want to take a look at the following related posts:

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Getting Started With Ruby On Rails

If you're a Web developer who's been curious about Ruby on Rails but has never gotten around to trying it out because you couldn't find a suitable overview of its advantages, then this article is for you. We want to bring Ruby on Rails closer to those who want to take a peek first, without going through an entire tutorial. So, this article is structured a little different from most other introductions out there; hopefully it is more useful because of this.

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I assume you're already familiar with some other form of Web development, whether PHP, Python, Perl or Java, and relational databases like MySQL. First, we'll introduce Rails and Ruby and the basic ideas behind both. I'll teach you just enough Ruby so that you understand the code samples. I'll tell you how to get Ruby on Rails running on your computer, and I'll give you an overview of the basic functionality of Rails and demonstrate how Rails' main parts work together.

This tutorial consists of two articles: in the current, first article we get started with some basic concepts and essential components of Ruby on Rails. In the second part (it will be published next week) you will learn how to install the engine; you'll also take a closer look at Rails’ inner workings and discover main advantages of Ruby on Rails. Please stay tuned.

After reading these parts, you should have an idea of whether Rails is for you. If you get the feeling that it is, I'll point you to some good tutorials on the Web that you can use to learn Rails. I'll also provide a lot of further reading recommendations so you can dig as deep into the topic as you like.

You may want to take a look at the following related posts:

Read more...

10 Useful Tips For Ruby On Rails Developers

Rails is an model-view-controller Web framework written in the Ruby programming language. One of its great appeals is being able to quickly crank out CRUD-based Web applications. A big advantage of Rails over other frameworks is that it values convention over configuration. If you follow the correct conventions, you can avoid lengthy configuration of files, and things just work! Therefore, you spend less time writing boring config files and more time focusing on business logic.

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Now, we love Rails. But don’t get us wrong. Like any tool, it’s not the perfect solution to every problem. A lot of the biggest complaints people have about the framework come from using it in situations where something simpler, smaller and more lightweight would do just fine. We love Sinatra for anything with minimal server-side involvement. Merb is another excellent minimal framework. And nothing beats apps that run completely in the browser with JavaScript: they can be deployed nearly for free, can scale almost infinitely and never have to be restarted.

In the overview below we present 10 useful tips, ideas and resources for Ruby on Rails-developers (both newbies and professionals). Please feel free to share your tips, ideas and suggestions in the comments to this post!

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