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Posts Tagged ‘Showcases’.

We are pleased to present below all posts tagged with ‘Showcases’.

Best Practices For Web Design For Kids

Designing websites and related media for kids presents plenty of opportunities for Web designers. Openings are available at many businesses and schools, as well as through parents and kids themselves, giving designers many ways to find work on electronic and print projects that appeal to kids. The types of work range from interface designs for video games to websites for birthday parties.

There was a time when kids’ websites were brash and busy, packed with colors and cartoon typography. Fortunately, the scale of the children’s market across most product ranges has resulted in rapid innovation in recent years. Most websites aimed at children (or children and adults) now follow principles that take some account of kids’ perspectives on Web design.


Useful Ideas And Guidelines For Good Web Form Design

The input form is an essential element of almost any website or application these days. Input is a core method of interaction, and in many cases it represents the hard conversion point between success and failure. With the amount time and effort we put into bringing users to our sign-up and contact forms, it’s surprising that we tend not to spend a proportional amount of time on the forms themselves.

Best Practices of Web Form Design

A number of techniques and elements can be used in Web forms to turn them from abject failures into successful conversion points. In this article, we'll present some interesting examples and useful guidelines for Web form design.


The Story Of Scandinavian Design: Combining Function and Aesthetics

For a long time, art has been heavily influenced by the social and political landscape. Searching through history, we find that while the social views of a certain period may no longer be relevant, the art and design of that time often are. Designers today constantly draw inspiration from history, consciously and unconsciously. Being aware of that history and knowing what has come before in your field can help you better convey the meaning in your work and forge deeper connections to your environment (artistic, social, political, etc.).


Looking back to the beginning of the 20th century and the styles and movements that ruled the art world at that time, we will look for influences and ideas that have evolved into what has been known since the mid-20th century as “Scandinavian design”. This article also offers some thoughts on how to incorporate its principles in your work today.


Planning And Implementing Website Navigation

The thing that makes navigation difficult to work with in Web design is that it can be so versatile. Navigation can be simple or complex: a few main pages or a multi-level architecture; one set of content for logged-in users and another for logged-out users; and so on. Because navigation can vary so much between websites, there are no set guidelines or how-to’s for organizing navigation.

Designing navigation is an art in itself, and designers become better at it with experience. It’s all about using good information architecture: “the art of expressing a model or concept of information used in activities that require explicit details of complex systems.”


Building An Effective ‘Coming Soon’ Page For Your Product

I recently had to design a couple of teaser pages for a client and a personal project, and this led me to think about what exactly makes for a good teaser page — or to be more precise a “coming soon” page that companies often put up before they’re ready to launch their product. After careful research and many scientific tests in the brand new field of teaserology, I’ve developed a patented Teaser Effectiveness Analysis Matrix™, consisting of four elements.


The perfect teaser page must score high on all four axis of the following: memorability, virality, desirability and data collection-ability. I know that “data collection-ability” is not proper English, but inventing new words is one of the perks of being a scientist. As we’ll see, most teaser pages focus strongly on two or three of these elements but rarely hit all four.


Showcase of Creative Navigation Menus: Good and Bad Examples

Good navigation is the main cornerstone of an effective website. In practice, however, it's often a tough challenge to come up with a meaningful, unambiguous way to organize, arrange, and display content to users; and it's often not much easier to find a visually interesting solution either. The wide adaption of JavaScript libraries like jQuery is making it increasingly easy to add various kinds of sleek animations to navigation design.

Design Intellection

For instance, many recent promo websites are essentially single page websites with an array of animation effects used to make navigation a smoother and richer user experience. We need to be very careful and cautious when using these dynamic effects in our designs. A simple, calm navigation is usually much more user-friendly than an evolved, dynamic one. Users want to use the website, not be baffled by the weird and hardly usable navigation. But that's not to say that a creative navigation should be avoided at all costs.


Showcase of Beautiful (or Creative) E-Commerce Websites

Designers are constantly striving to create eye-catching designs without losing the usability features that add significant importance to the experience of online shopping. Today's showcase presents a variety of websites with elegant design solutions and innovative design techniques. We have analyzed the designs and now discuss their advantages and disadvantages in this review. We also suggest improvements and further ideas that could help improve shopping experience on these sites. Hopefully, you can learn something useful from our thoughts.

Oi Polloi is small retail store based in the Northern Quarter, Manchester, UK. This website has a retro style, supported by the typewriter-style typograph and old print-style textures. They capture the Oi Polloi brand well. The navigation menu is a good old drop-down which doesn’t quite work, especially because the page has six of them on top. This requires a bit more clicks than you’re used to on an e-commerce website. When you roll over an item on a product page, a tooltip provides details about available (and unavailable) colours and sizes. It might be useful including these options in the search as well.


Creative Use of Video in Web Design: Background Videos

Since its early days, video has been one of the most powerful and efficient tools of visual communication. It is able to deliver a direct and clear message to a broad audience as well as focus viewers on something particular. A visually appealing video is an excellent way to present a product, service or brand and take user experience to a much more interactive level. For this reason, elegant, creative and professional videos are becoming increasingly popular in Web design today.

Bulgari B.Zero1 in Background Video Showcase

Some designers go even further, creating Bluray-like experience in the browser, with interactive navigation menus, soft transitions and exceptional visual effects — all supported with background videos. This can be done with Flash or HTML5, however, most websites incorporate background videos using only Flash. To enable the rich cross-device experience, it is worth considering adding fallback-videos for those users who have a browser that does not support Flash. Nevertheless, we didn't want to go into technical details just yet and wanted to see what actual approaches designers take within their websites.


Showcase Of Beautiful But Unusable Websites

"Form follows function" is a widely accepted — albeit controversial — principle that most designers in a variety of disciplines have adopted since its inception at the turn of the 20th century. On the web, we commonly refer to function as usability which is the ease of use and navigation of a website in order to achieve user's goals.



In this showcase we present websites that sacrifice usability for beauty and present issues related to clutter, loading, navigation, archiving or visibility. Unfortunately, although the sites featured in this showcase are visually appealing, they are quite difficult to use. By studying such examples, we can learn what mistakes we can avoid in our designs and how not to strive for strong aesthetic appearances on the account of usability.


Designing Memorable Websites: Showcase of Creative Designs

One of the main goals of having a website, whether it be a portfolio website or a business website, is to declare your presence on the Web. There are thousands upon thousands of websites out there; it's pretty well established that you are competing for your audience's interest and attention. To this end, it’s important to make those few seconds count when making a first impression.


There are many things happening in web design today. One of the interesting developments is the emergence of responsive web design, in which fluid grids, flexible images, and CSS media queries are used to create more adaptive layouts and hence more elegant user experiences. These designs can adapt to the browser's viewport, completely changing the layout or the overall design of the page altogether, to fit the available space.

We also see a rising popularity of soft :hover and :active/:focus-effects, where buttons, navigation items and links feel more responsive and engaging as well. The transitions are smooth, and often subtly or vividly animated. Another important development is of course the rich web typography, made possible with the emergence of font embedding services. We have much more freedom for our typographic decisions which is an opportunity to create more diverse, unique and therefore memorable designs.


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