Posts Tagged ‘Showcases’

We are pleased to present below all posts tagged with ‘Showcases’.

Showcase Of Beautiful Vertical Navigation Designs

Go to any website and you're guaranteed to find one thing: a navigation menu. Navigation menus enable visitors to move from page to page; without them, we would have no way to conveniently explore websites. Perhaps this is why designers, information architects, usability researchers and user experience specialists invest so much time and resources into devising aesthetically pleasing and user-friendly navigation systems.

gary's real life

Website navigation menus generally come in one of two orientations: vertical and horizontal. Horizontal navigation menus display items side by side. Vertical navigation menus stack items on top of each other. In this post, we highlight some remarkable vertical navigation menus, for your inspiration.

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What If Oscars Were Given To Movie Websites?

Many of us today probably use the Web to book tickets and find information about movies. By selling tickets and entertaining visitors, websites help movies succeed at the box office and earn public approval. And yet, website developers don’t get any public recognition for the success of movies. Isn’t it a bit unfair in the Internet era not to bestow a single bit of appreciation for the presentation of movies online?

Most modern movie websites are built in Flash, even when it’s totally unjustified. The websites often lack usability standards and require users to click through splash pages and introductions in order to access content. They have the luxury of being able to neglect common principles and standards because they garner attention merely by their association with the movies they promote. Let’s suppose, though, that these developers got their own Palmes d'Ors, Oscars and Bears. Wouldn't this be strong motivation to create outstanding and usable websites?

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Maps In Modern Web Design: Showcase and Examples

Geo-location was a hot topic in 2009. With so many applications on GPS-enabled smartphones, more maps than ever were accessible to the average person. But how can Web designers and developers take advantage of an increasingly location-aware user base? This article explores existing trends, conventions and the possible future of interactive maps online.

Roadmap to Harmony

When most people think of maps on the Internet, Google, MapQuest and TomTom might come to mind. These are the giants in the industry, but they are far from the most creative. These companies provide maps as a service. As you'll see from the mapping applications featured throughout this article, Google doesn't own the market. There is still plenty of room for creative map innovation.

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Showcase of Academic and Higher Education Websites

College and university websites have a lot of roles to fill. They need to provide information for prospective students (both new and transfer), parents of students and prospective students, current students, and alumni. In many cases, they're also the gateway to the school's intranet and the public face for both academics and athletics. They often need to include reams of information in a way that makes everything easy to find. It's a huge challenge.

Screenshot

And the truth is: most collge and university websites are horribly designed. Either they look like they were designed fifteen years ago and then forgotten about, or they're so overloaded with information that it's almost impossible to find what you're looking for.

But not every college or university website is horrible. There are some excellent sites out there, and below are some of them. If you know others, please share them in the comments to this post!

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Showcase Of Web Design In China: From Imitation To Innovation

China is a country with five thousand years of civilization. It is a multi-national entity extending over a large area of East Asia. China's cultural influence extends across the continent, with customs and writing systems adopted by neighboring countries including Japan, Korea and Vietnam.

Dongpai

China has gone through numerous ups and downs and twists and turns, from wealthy and prosperous (as during the Tang Dynasty back in 618–907 AD) to powerless and colonized (as during the Qing Dynasty, just around 100 years ago). Now China is reopening its door to the world again, embracing the latest trends, concepts and technologies, the World Wide Web being one of them.

In our interviews with six well-known designers in China, each of whom wears different hats, the recurring theme was that China's Web design industry is rising like a spiral from imitation to innovation and user-centered design.

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Graphics Package Standards and Practices

The term "graphics package" stands for the animated logos, text backgrounds, idents, screen bugs and lower thirds that make up the branding of a television show, television station or documentary. The are used to re-affirm what the viewer is watching. Especially with the growing number of reality and web shows these sorts of animated graphics are being used more and more frequently. Workers in the television industry may be more familar with these concepts than movie and web animators, but the concepts are the same and can be used on a number of different video projects.</p

This article will explain each of the most common terms, their size and color requirements and what arenas they are most frequently used in.

Most importantly, graphics packages must have a cohesive look to all their parts and be easy to use. Frequently, graphics packages are used by outside firms and videographers. This means that the designer/ animator may not always be there to make sure that their work is being used properly. Following some simple rules–and creating simple rules–will ensure that the graphics package is used to its full effects.

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50 Fantastic Favicons: Episode 9

Every now and again we showcase fantastic favicons, those tiny pieces of art that you’ll find in your browser’s address bar or when rifling through your bookmarks. These little gems are important because they serve as visual indicators to help visitors easily identify content in their browser. That aside, favicons are just nice to look at, and way too many websites don’t make use of them. We want to change that, which is why we are presenting what is now the ninth episode in our favicons series: a small article with tiny images and fast loading time… for a change.

illu_favicon09

Any picture's merit is debatable. But notice that these favicons were chosen not simply for their beauty and originality; it was important to us also that each fit the overall website design and logo. Pay attention to the details of the design.

All favicons are linked, of course, to the websites from where they were taken (if they still exist). Click on them to get more insight into how favicon design relates to overall layout design. The order here does not indicate any ranking.

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