Posts Tagged ‘Techniques’

We are pleased to present below all posts tagged with ‘Techniques’.

Adapting To A Responsive Design (Case Study)

This is the story of what we learned during a redesign for our most demanding client — ourselves! In this article, I will explain, from our own experience of refreshing our agency website, why we abandoned a separate mobile website and will review our process of creating a new responsive design.

Adapting To A Responsive Design (Case Study)

At Cyber-Duck, we have been designing both responsive websites and adaptive mobile websites for several years now. Both options, of course, have their pros and cons.

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Facing The Challenge: Building A Responsive Web Application

We are talking and reading a lot about responsive Web design (RWD) these days, but very little attention is given to Web applications. Admittedly, RWD still has to be ironed out. But many of us believe it to be a strong concept, and it is here to stay. So, why don’t we extend this topic to HTML5-powered applications?

Facing The Challenge: Building A Responsive Web Application

Because responsive Web applications (RWAs) are both a huge opportunity and a big challenge, I wanted to dive in. Building a RWA is more feasible than you might think. In this article, we will explore ideas and solutions.

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Clown Car Technique: Solving Adaptive Images In Responsive Web Design

Adaptive images are the current hot topic in conversations about adaptive and responsive Web design. Why? Because no one likes any of the solutions thus far. New elements and attributes are being discussed as a solution for what is, for most of us, a big headache: to provide every user with one image optimized for their display size and resolution, without wasting time, memory or bandwidth with a client-side solution.

Clown Car Technique

We have foreground and background images. We have large and small displays. We have regular and high-resolution displays. We have high-bandwidth and low-bandwidth connections. We have portrait and landscape orientations.

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Tips And Tricks For Testing WordPress Themes

Whether you offer free or premium themes, testing should be a major part of your development process. By planning in advance, you can foster a development environment that deters some bugs by design and that helps you prevent others.

Tips And Tricks For Testing WordPress Themes

The aim of this article is to share some of the tricks I use personally during and after development to achieve a bug-free product. This article is split into three distinct sections Setting up, Development phase and Final testing. This should give you a good overview of what you can do over the course of the development cycle.

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The State Of Responsive Web Design

Responsive Web design has been around for some years now, and it was a hot topic in 2012. Many well-known people such as Brad Frost and Luke Wroblewski have a lot of experience with it and have helped us make huge improvements in the field. But there’s still a whole lot to do.

The State Of Responsive Web Design

In this article, we will look at what is currently possible, what will be possible in the future using what are not yet standardized properties (such as CSS Level 4 and HTML5 APIS), and what still needs to be improved. This article is not exhaustive, and we won’t go deep into each technique, but you’ll have enough links and knowledge to explore further by yourself.

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Building The New Financial Times Web App (A Case Study)

When the mockups for the new Financial Times application hit our desks in mid-2012, we knew we had a real challenge on our hands. Many of us on the team (including me) swore that parts of interface would not be possible in HTML5.

Building The New Financial Times Web App: A Case Study

Given the product team’s passion for the new UI, we rolled up our sleeves and gave it our best shot. We were tasked with implementing a far more challenging product, without compromising the reliable, performant experience that made the first app so successful.

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Keeping The Big <picture> SmallHow To Avoid Duplicate Downloads In Responsive Images

The <picture> element is a new addition to HTML5 that’s being championed by the W3C’s Responsive Images Community Group (RICG). It is intended to provide a declarative, markup-based solution to enable responsive images without the need of JavaScript libraries or complicated server-side detection.

How To Avoid Duplicate Downloads In Responsive Images

The <picture> element supports a number of different types of fallback content, but the current implementation of these fallbacks is problematic. In this article, we’ll explore how the fallbacks work, how they fail and what can be done about it.

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