Posts Tagged ‘Techniques’

We are pleased to present below all posts tagged with ‘Techniques’.

Five Useful CSS/jQuery Coding Techniques For More Dynamic Websites

Interactivity can transform a dull static website into a dynamic tool that not only delights users but conveys information more effectively. In this post, we'll walk through five different coding techniques that can be easily implemented on any website to provide a richer user experience. These techniques will allow you to better display difficult content, help users find information more effectively and provide meaningful UI cues without overwhelming the user: on-page text search, drag controls for oversized content, subtle hover effects, comment count bars and a full-page slider.

Drag controls for oversized content

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Websites often have search boxes to allow users to find content from their archives. But what if you want to find content on the given page? Information Architects has had on-page text search that provides a great user experience. Let's recreate this using jQuery.

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The Power of Adobe Fireworks: What Can You Achieve With It?

Our recent article covering the new features of Adobe Fireworks CS5 provoked a very interesting and intense debate. But because comments ranged from "Fireworks is the best tool for screen design!" to "What exactly is Fireworks?", we thought that another article on this topic might be very useful to Smashing Magazine readers.

Firefox logo, by Jon Hicks

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However, this time the article will not focus so much on the tool itself, but rather on what can be achieved with it, and more specifically — what can be achieved with its visual/graphic design capabilities. We also hope that the following showcase of inspiring illustrations, created entirely in Fireworks, will not only be interesting to our readers, but will also help put an end to the common misconception that Fireworks is mostly a prototyping tool – and – that for "serious" design you must switch to other tools, namely Photoshop or Illustrator.

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How To Use CSS3 Media Queries To Create a Mobile Version of Your Website

CSS3 continues to both excite and frustrate web designers and developers. We are excited about the possibilities that CSS3 brings, and the problems it will solve, but also frustrated by the lack of support in Internet Explorer 8. This article will demonstrate a technique that uses part of CSS3 that is also unsupported by Internet Explorer 8. However, it doesn't matter as one of the most useful places for this module is somewhere that does have a lot of support - small devices such as the iPhone, and Android devices.

dConstruct 2010 website on a desktop browser

In this article I'll explain how, with a few CSS rules, you can create an iPhone version of your site using CSS3, that will work now. We'll have a look at a very simple example and I'll also discuss the process of adding a small screen device stylesheet to my own site to show how easily we can add stylesheets for mobile devices to existing websites.

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Start Using CSS3 Today: Techniques and Tutorials

We have been publishing articles about CSS3 for a while now, and we keep receiving angry e-mails from some developers who complain that it doesn't make sense to use CSS3 today. Yes, Internet Explorer doesn't support most CSS3 properties. And yes, CSS3 vendor prefixes are bad for maintainability (and this is why we recommend extracting vendor prefixes in a separate CSS3 file).

But it's OK to accept that Web is a dynamic medium, and it's OK to create rich, interactive, beautiful designs for those who are already using a modern browser or will be using one soon. It just doesn't make sense to keep looking back, being afraid of looking forward and therefore avoid experimenting and learning about new CSS3 properties today. And this is why we keep publishing articles about CSS3.

CSS3 Leopard-style Stacks

In this post we present an extensive round-up of CSS3 techniques, tools and resources that will help you learn how to use CSS3 in your designs right away. We have grouped most useful articles by the corresponding properties, described what browsers support what properties, presented alternative JavaScript-based approaches and workarounds for Internet Explorer and added a couple of links to useful CSS3 generators and tools in the end of the post.

You may be interested in the following related articles:

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50 New Useful CSS Techniques, Tools and Tutorials

Over the last years we've got a pretty good understanding of what CSS does, how it works and how we can use it for our layouts, typography and visual presentation of the content. However, there are still some attributes that are not so well-known; also, CSS3 offers us new possibilities and tools that need to be understood, learned and then applied in the right context to the right effect.

CSS font stacks

In this round-up we present fresh useful articles about less-known CSS 2.1 and CSS3 properties as well as an overview of recently published CSS techniques, tools and tips for designers and web-developers. Please stay tuned: next week we will present the second part of this article, featuring fresh CSS3 techniques, tools and resources.

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Connecting The Dots With CSS3

As a web community, we’ve made a lot of exciting progress in regards to CSS3. We’ve put properties like text-shadow & border-radius to good use while stepping into background-clip and visual effects like transitions and animations. We’ve also spent a great deal of time debating how and when to implement these properties. Just because a property isn’t widely supported by browsers or fully documented at the moment, it doesn’t mean that we shouldn’t be working with it. In fact, I’d argue the opposite.

CSS Three: Connecting The Dots

Best practices for CSS3 usage need to be hashed out in blog posts, during spare time, and outside of client projects. Coming up with creative and sensible ways to get the most out of CSS3 will require the kind of experimentation wherein developers gladly trade ten failures for a single success. Right now, there are tons of property combinations and uses out there waiting to be discovered. All we have to do is connect the dots. It’s time to get your hands dirty and innovate!

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Adobe Fireworks: Is It Worth Switching to CS5?

Adobe Fireworks is the Swiss Army knife for many developers and Web, UX, UI and graphic designers. The application is known for its versatility, excellent blend of vector and bitmap tools and powerful built-in wireframing and prototyping options. Also, according to the SoDA 2010 Digital Marketing Outlook survey, Fireworks has become an important tool for many digital agencies.

It now has the same standing as other core Adobe products, such as Flash, Flex and Dreamweaver (to the question "Which technical skill sets, if any, will you look to hire or contract in 2010?", approx. 12% of the survey respondents replied "Fireworks", and to the question "Which tools/products will you or your organization use in 2010?", more than 44% of the survey respondents replied that they will be using Fireworks).

The Property Inspector Panel in Fireworks CS5

None of the official Adobe pages actually answer the question that so many design professionals are asking in the first place: is Fireworks CS5 really better? Will it save you time and effort? Are the new features worth the upgrade price? This article gives detailed answers to these questions. We'll present a neat list of Fireworks CS5's new features and improved workflows, along with examples of how they will make your work much more efficient.

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