Posts Tagged ‘Tools’

We are pleased to present below all posts tagged with ‘Tools’.

Open Device Labs: Why Should We Care?

With all of the different smartphones, tablets and other devices that sport various operating systems and versions thereof, a Web developer’s job — testing (sometimes virtually) on multiple devices to resolve errors — hasn’t become any simpler.

Open Device Labs: Why Should We Care?

This article suggests how we can manage these tasks without pouring a truck-load of money into actually buying all of these different devices.

Read more...

Designing CSS Layouts With Flexbox Is As Easy As Pie

Flexible box layout (or flexbox) is a new box model optimized for UI layout. As one of the first CSS modules designed for actual layout (floats were really meant mostly for things such as wrapping text around images), it makes a lot of tasks much easier, or even possible at all.

Centering Elements With Flexbox Is As Easy As Pie

Flexbox’s repertoire includes the simple centering of elements (both horizontally and vertically), the expansion and contraction of elements to fill available space, and source-code independent layout, among others abilities.

Read more...

Content Knowledge Is Power

“Content matters!” “Comp with real copy!” “Have a plan!” By now, you’ve probably heard the refrain: making mobile work is hard if you don’t consider your content. But content knowledge isn’t just about ditching lorem ipsum in a couple of comps.

Content Knowledge Is Power

Countless organizations now have a decade or two’s worth of Web content — content that’s shoved somewhere underneath their redesigned-nine-times home page. Content that’s stuck in the crannies of some sub-sub-subnavigation. Content that’s clogging up a CMS with WYSIWYG-generated markup.

Read more...

ReleaseResponsive Nav: A Simple JavaScript Plugin For Responsive Navigation

There are several ways to make navigation responsive, and usually the solution we need is quite straightforward. But despite the apparent simplicity, there are many underlying factors which, when thought through and implemented properly, can make a simple solution even better without adding more complexity to the user interface.

Responsive Nav: A Simple JavaScript Plugin For Responsive Navigation

One of the problems I’ve encountered while building responsive navigations is that browsers currently don’t support CSS3 transitions to a height which is defined auto. Most of the time, we shouldn’t use fixed height either because the height of menu items might not be the same in all browsers, and the number of items may change. I also always try to reduce the weight of pages I build, so I’ve been wanting a solution that doesn’t require a big library such as jQuery to work.

Read more...

Sneak Peek Into The Future: CSS Selectors, Level 4

The buzzword “CSS4” came out of nowhere, just as we were getting used to the fact that CSS3 is here and will stick around for some time. Browser vendors are working hard to implement the latest features, and front-end developers are creating more and more tools to be able to work with the style sheets more effectively.

Sneak Peek Into The Future: Selectors, Level 4

But now, on hearing about CSS4, you might ask, “Hey, what about CSS3? Is it over already?” We’ve been working hard to spread the goodness of CSS3, and now it’s obsolete?

Read more...

“My Hard Drive Crashed…” (And What I Learned From It)

The most valuable part of a computer is also its most fragile: Data are the wealth of a digital lifestyle, a currency of which many notes are irreplaceable. At least, that’s how I felt staring at a “Confirm you want to wipe your hard disk” message, my finger poised over the mouse.

Backblaze's drop-down menu controls

During an emergency is a bad time to plan for one. It’s the feeling one might get jumping from a plane before checking one’s parachute. That’s one experience I’d rather avoid, but it happened. Not the skydiving part. My OS was dying, and I wasn’t prepared.

People who make websites face a triple threat: Live websites need backups; test environments need backups, especially when they double as backups for live websites. Subversion and Git provide safety nets in case of data loss. But there are also support files: Photoshop files, fonts, reusable jQuery snippets — not to mention music collections, an essential part of many creative processes.

Read more...

Burning Excessive CodeThe Vanilla Web Diet

Editor's note: This is an introductory article about a book idea to be published by Smashing Magazine with Chris Heilmann. Check out what we propose as an idea — explaining a way to reconsider how we build websites to ensure they are leaner and more future-proof. At the end of the article, we'd ask you to fill out a quick survey to show your interest.

The Vanilla Web Diet

The Web as it is now is suffering from an obesity problem. If you surf the Web on a flaky mobile connection or some hotel wireless, you'll find yourself a lot of times staring at a page or app that doesn't do anything and doesn't tell you what is going on either. The spinner in the tab or the URL bar seems to be the thing that gets the most mileage in browsers.

Read more...

↑ Back to top