Posts Tagged ‘Tutorials’

We are pleased to present below all posts tagged with ‘Tutorials’.

Preparing Artwork for Screen Printing in Adobe Illustrator

Getting t-shirts printed is an ideal way to promote your business, organization or event. They are a promotional item that people can actually use, and they have the added bonus of being an advertisement for you. In this post, Adobe Illustrator will be used to create a three-color screen print using a fictional company logo, and have it set up to allow a screen printer to easily print the color separations that create the separate screens for each color print.

Creating a new Spot Color Swatch

Although some printers prefer to create their own separations, it’s always good to understand the process. Be sure to communicate with your printer as they will specify their requirements, and will often give you tips for avoiding potential issues in the process.

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Illustrator’s Live Trace: Sketch to Vector

In this post we will take a drawn design, scan it and clean it up in Photoshop, then trace it using the Live Trace feature in Adobe Illustrator. Live Trace was introduced in Adobe Illustrator CS2 but is still a powerful tool available in Illustrator CS5. This process really gives an artist the freedom to digitally experiment with drawings of any kind.

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The vector art it produces can be used in numerous ways and is easily customized. My motivation for trying this was originally to make a "growing vine"-type animation in Adobe After Effects. I will show a link to the resulting animation at the end of this tutorial, but for now, let's get started.

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Creating Graphs With Adobe Illustrator

Office applications are getting very advanced these days offering all sorts of fancy features for data visualization. Graph generation is a standard feature in desktop applications like Microsoft Excel or OpenOffice.org Calc, but it can also be achieved in non-spreadsheet applications like Adobe Illustrator.

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If you're unfamiliar with the process of creating graphs in Adobe Illustrator, this article will help in giving you some insight into the work-flow. It might also help you decide whether Illustrator is the right tool for this kind of assignment.

Adobe Illustrator offers 9 graph types to visualize data. You can choose from the following graphs: column, stacked column, bar, stacked bar, line, area, scatter, pie and radar.

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Useful Adobe Photoshop Techniques, Tutorials and Tools

As web designers, we always have something new to learn. Over the last decade our workflow has changed dramatically — it's become more sophisticated and highly diversified. Not only do we have a much larger variety of improved tools to use; there's also an endless stream of new techniques emerging and spreading within the web design community via social networks. And this is where the opportunity to learn new useful, practical approaches and techniques comes in.

Create an Awesome Number-Based Illustration

We can learn by exploring the different design approaches other designers have taken, when solving their problems and apply these approaches to our work to become more productive and skilled. Therefore, our editorial team is permanently looking for interesting techniques, tools and tutorials, which we carefully select and present in round-ups on Smashing Magazine. You needn't love our lists, but they often will give you some useful ideas and advice.

Below you'll find an overview of new useful Adobe Photoshop techniques and tutorials that we've found and collected over the last months. We sincerely hope that at least some of the techniques presented there will help you improve your graphic design skills in Adobe Photoshop. And sincere thanks to all designers and developers whose articles are featured in this review. We respect and appreciate your contributions to the design community, folks!

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The Process Behind Good Illustration (Part 3)

In Part II I started a list of some personal process-oriented thoughts on illustration—more specifically about some ways to help broaden the creative process and make its execution more effective. In this Part III, I'll wrap up the list in the same vein as Part II's, with a few more of my thoughts on the subject.

Once again, while I hope these tips strike the right chord with readers from all creative fields and levels, I share them partially because many of them are still so freshly new in my head, and I can recall vividly their having planted themselves there during my time as a student. That said, there's plenty more learning to be done on my end as well, and I invite you to share your responses and your own additions to the list in the comments, no matter what corner of the creative world you are from.

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The Process Behind Good Illustration (Part 2)

In Part I we skimmed the surface on a few points regarding when an image becomes an illustration. But, of course, this knowledge isn't very useful if we don’t know how to apply it to our work when the pencil hits the paper! Or, stylus hits the tablet, whatever it is you do.

In this second part of the article, I'd like to share some of these practices that have been invaluable to me as an illustration student, and ones that I will carry with me for a long time to come.

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Start Using CSS3 Today: Techniques and Tutorials

We have been publishing articles about CSS3 for a while now, and we keep receiving angry e-mails from some developers who complain that it doesn't make sense to use CSS3 today. Yes, Internet Explorer doesn't support most CSS3 properties. And yes, CSS3 vendor prefixes are bad for maintainability (and this is why we recommend extracting vendor prefixes in a separate CSS3 file).

But it's OK to accept that Web is a dynamic medium, and it's OK to create rich, interactive, beautiful designs for those who are already using a modern browser or will be using one soon. It just doesn't make sense to keep looking back, being afraid of looking forward and therefore avoid experimenting and learning about new CSS3 properties today. And this is why we keep publishing articles about CSS3.

CSS3 Leopard-style Stacks

In this post we present an extensive round-up of CSS3 techniques, tools and resources that will help you learn how to use CSS3 in your designs right away. We have grouped most useful articles by the corresponding properties, described what browsers support what properties, presented alternative JavaScript-based approaches and workarounds for Internet Explorer and added a couple of links to useful CSS3 generators and tools in the end of the post.

You may be interested in the following related articles:

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