Posts Tagged ‘Typography’

We are pleased to present below all posts tagged with ‘Typography’.

Designing For The Reading Experience

With the rise of Web fonts as well as affordable hosted Web font services and ready-made kits, typography is reclaiming its title as design queen, ruler of all graphic and Web design. At the same time, for far too many designers, the main concern about typography today seems to be aesthetic in nature.

Designing For The Reading Experience

The problem is, we tend to use typography and lettering as two interchangeable terms, which they are not. The allure of well-executed lettering — and, boy, I could spend hours just looking at lettering portfolios! — can affect the way we view typefaces, because both typography and lettering share common visual concepts.

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Web TypographySetting Weights And Styles With The @font-face Declaration

If people are on your website, they’re probably either skimming quickly, looking for something, or they’ve found what they’re looking for and want to read it as easily as possible. Either way, keeping text readable will help them achieve their goal.

Setting Weights And Styles With The @font-face Declaration

A few months ago, I wrote an article on “Avoiding Faux Weights and Styles with Google Web Fonts.” I ended the article by showing that weights and styles are an important UX element when setting text. Bold and italic forms of a font help people to skim your website.

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A Critical Approach To Typefaces

I've always wondered, “What is it that makes a typeface or any other design good?” However simplistic this question may seem to typographers, it is a legitimate question many of us are trying to answer.

A Critical Approach To Typefaces

After several years working as a professional type designer, teaching, and running a type foundry, I pretty much gave up my attempts to find a golden set of rules. The answer is not so simple.

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Understanding The Difference Between Type And Lettering

Coming out of the grunge, graffiti and David Carson era through the 90's, there has been a major resurgence of interest in typography. We have seen a number of designers and artists make their careers out of designing type or custom lettering, and it has become common to list typography among our skills and disciplines.

Understanding The Difference Between Type And Lettering

Unfortunately, as with any popularity surge, there have come with it a lot of misunderstandings of some of the terms and concepts that we use. This article will help you gain a clearer understanding of what typography is and isn't, and why.

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CSS Baseline: The Good, The Bad And The Ugly

Vertical rhythm is clearly an important part of Web design, yet on the subject of baseline, our community seems divided and there is no consensus as to how it fits in — if at all — with our growing and evolving toolkit for designing online.

CSS Baseline: The Good, The Bad And The Ugly

This may be due to a lack of understanding and appreciation of the benefits that follow from a baseline grid, but it is more likely because baseline is notoriously difficult to get right, and no one yet holds the blueprint to its successful implementation.

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Being Fogged in Font Aversion Hinders Sight

Yesterday we published the article "Why Won't Helvetica Go Away" in which Alastair Johnston discussed the evolution of Helvetica, the reasons for its popularity as well as his thoughts on why designers should start questioning the usefulness of Helvetica in their projects. Hours later Indra Kupferschmid published an article in which she corrected some of the facts presented in the original article. We republish Indra's article to correct the factual errors, with her permission of course.—Ed.

This isn’t a “blue pencil” (I could never challenge master Shaw); just a lazy, quick rant. Alastair Johnston wrote an article on Helvetica posted on Smashing Magazine yesterday. I don’t want to comment on his strong opinion and cut out most of his subjective ranting. But some facts seem to have gotten a bit wonky.

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Why Won’t Helvetica Go Away?

The other day someone sent me a link to a website with the preposterous title of “The 100 Best Typefaces of All Time”. Topping the chart was Helvetica, and that stirred my ire. I dismissed the list because it was based on marketing figures from one source, FontShop, coupled with the opinions of half a dozen Berlin-based typographers, but I was still incensed.

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When it comes to, say, boxers, you can handicap the various athletes in the ring and predict that Muhammad Ali would beat Jack Johnson or Jim Corbett and that, therefore, he is number one, but a lot of other factors come to bear on your decision: sentimentality, the fact that Ali is acknowledged (by people like me, with no real knowledge of the sport) to be “The Greatest”; he has name recognition, and so on. But how do you evaluate a typeface? Is it just based on its widespread use? Or its suitability to the subject at hand? Ease of reading? Familiarity?

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