Posts Tagged ‘Typography’

We are pleased to present below all posts tagged with ‘Typography’.

Making Sense Of Type Classification (Part 1)

In my previous article on Smashing Magazine (“Understanding the Difference Between Typography and Lettering”), I wrote about how understanding type terminology can help us better appreciate the arts of typography and lettering.

Making Sense Of Type Classification, Part 1

This article again deals with terminology, probably more specifically than most designers are used to, and the title gets to the heart of what I’m communicating in this article. Everyone knows their serifs and sans, slabs and scripts, but most classifications go much deeper than that.

Read more...

Logical Breakpoints For Your Responsive Design

There are several tactics for deciding where to put breakpoints in a responsive design. There is the rusty idea that they should be based on common screen sizes, but this doesn’t scale well. There are no “common” screen sizes. Another popular tactic is to create a breakpoint wherever the layout breaks.

Logical Breakpoints For Your Responsive Design

This sounds much better. But it still leaves us with the question, How do you determine whether the layout is broken? One logical answer is to look at classic readability theory and to define our breakpoints based on that.

Read more...

Typeplate: A Starter Kit For Beautiful Web Type

As of today we’re pleased to announce Typeplate, a free-range and open-source typographic starter kit that will hopefully help you build beautiful, text-rich websites. The word on the street is that the Web Is 95% Typography, so as we hurtle towards the future, we think there’s still a lot we can learn from five centuries of history.

Typeplate: A Starter Kit For Beautiful Web Type

Typeplate is the result of this exploration of our typographic heritage. We made Typeplate because we weren’t satisfied with existing Web frameworks.

Read more...

Creating Exciting And Unusual Visual Hierarchies

Layout, for both print and screen, is one of the most important aspects of graphic design. Designs that extend across multiple pages or screens, whether containing large or small amounts of type, must be carefully controlled in a way that is enticing and is easy for all to access.

Creating Exciting And Unusual Visual Hierarchies With Typography

Careful control of visual hierarchy is a key aspect of the design decisions we have to consider. In this article, we will look at how frequently type needs to be broken down into different levels, such as topic, importance and tone of voice.

Read more...

Designing For The Reading Experience

With the rise of web fonts as well as affordable hosted web font services and ready-made kits, typography is reclaiming its title as design queen, ruler of all graphic and web design. At the same time, for far too many designers, the main concern about typography today seems to be aesthetic in nature.

Designing For The Reading Experience

The problem is, we tend to use typography and lettering as two interchangeable terms, which they are not. The allure of well-executed lettering — and, boy, I could spend hours just looking at lettering portfolios! — can affect the way we view typefaces, because both typography and lettering share common visual concepts.

Read more...

Web TypographySetting Weights And Styles With The @font-face Declaration

If people are on your website, they’re probably either skimming quickly, looking for something, or they’ve found what they’re looking for and want to read it as easily as possible. Either way, keeping text readable will help them achieve their goal.

Setting Weights And Styles With The @font-face Declaration

A few months ago, I wrote an article on “Avoiding Faux Weights and Styles with Google Web Fonts.” I ended the article by showing that weights and styles are an important UX element when setting text. Bold and italic forms of a font help people to skim your website.

Read more...

A Critical Approach To Typefaces

I've always wondered, “What is it that makes a typeface or any other design good?” However simplistic this question may seem to typographers, it is a legitimate question many of us are trying to answer.

A Critical Approach To Typefaces

After several years working as a professional type designer, teaching, and running a type foundry, I pretty much gave up my attempts to find a golden set of rules. The answer is not so simple.

Read more...

↑ Back to top