Posts Tagged ‘User Experience’

We are pleased to present below all posts tagged with ‘User Experience’.

How Do You Design Interaction?

If you have to design an interface it's almost obvious to think to begin the process by drawing. But is this the best way? I once casually started by writing an imagined human-computer conversation, and only afterwards I continued by drawing. This changed my way of thinking and I never went back to drawing first. This article will explain the reasons behind my decision.

How Do You Design Interaction?

I have always been a huge admirer of the guys at Basecamp. Some time ago, I was reading a tweet by Jason Zimdars, one of its designers: “UI design starts with words.” He wasn’t joking. The comment got a lot of retweets, a lot of favorites. Everyone understood what he meant — except me.

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A Roadmap To Becoming An A/B Testing Expert

A/B testing, also known as split testing, is the method of pitting two versions of a landing page against each other in a battle of conversion. You test to see which version does a better job of leading visitors to one of your goals, like signing up or subscribing to a newsletter. You can test two entirely different designs for a landing page or you can test small tweaks, like changes to a few words in your copy.

Roadmap To Becoming An A/B Testing Expert

Running A/B tests on your website can help you improve your communication with visitors and back up important design decisions with real data from real users. With the multitude of tools available (detailed later), split testing has become easy for even non-technical people to design and manage.

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What Is The Most Underrated Word In Web Design?

An "affordance" is a perceived signal or clue that an object may be used to perform a particular action. A chair sits at around knee height and appears to provide support. It affords sitting. A toothbrush has a handle a little longer than the human palm. It affords gripping.

What Is The Most Underrated Word In Web Design?

All of the objects that surround us have affordances: some are explicit (the “Push” sign above a door handle), and others are hidden (a chair could be used to break a window or used as a weapon). The term was first coined by psychologist James G. Gibson, then introduced to human-computer interaction by Donald Norman in his book The Psychology of Everyday Things, required reading for budding industrial and product designers everywhere.

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A User In Total Control Is A Designer’s Nightmare

How do you balance the creative control you give to the users, the usability of the product they make with your tool and the flexibility of that tool? We designers have always had a problem of handing over creative control to the general population — the basic users. There are two reasons for this.

A User In Total Control Is A Designer's Nightmare

The first is obvious: We are the ones who are supposed to know the principles of design and usability. Some of us were born with this feeling of what feels and looks right, while other designers have learned it — at least good designers eventually have.

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Case Study Maintaining Momentum Through Efficient Mobile Design

When interacting with mobile devices, users have little patience for confusing interfaces or unnecessary steps that impede their progress. As designers, we must understand the role of momentum in effective user interface design and create experiences that keep our users moving forward.

Maintaining Momentum Through Efficient Mobile Design

Think about the act of checking email on a mobile device. This is probably one of our most efficient interactions with our phones; we do it while crossing the street, between conversations and even (for the dangerous few!) while driving. Every distracting bit of user interface (UI) that could get in the way of checking our email has been stripped from the design, making it a streamlined process that we love doing.

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Streamlining Mobile Interactions

The mobile web is a harsh environment: mobile processors are slower than their desktop counterparts; network connectivity is flaky; bandwidth is low; latency is high; and touchscreen keyboards are slow. The best mobile web applications are the ones that excel at handling these challenges.

Streamlining Mobile Interactions

In this article, we'll look at how to identify the tasks your users want to accomplish on a mobile device, memorize as much as you can about your users’ situation, presume that your users’ actions will succeed (and get them to their next task) and also how to predict your users’ next actions, and prepare accordingly.

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Mobile And Accessibility: Why You Should Care And What You Can Do About It

Mobile has revolutionized the way we use the web. This is especially true of disabled users, for whom mobile devices open the door to a whole new spectrum of interactions.

Mobile And Accessibility: Why You Should Care And What You Can Do About It

And they are taking advantage of it. A July 2013 survey (PDF) of adults with disabilities done by the Wireless Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center found that 91% of people with disabilities use a “wireless device such as a cell phone or tablet.” Among these users, screen reader usage is common, even on mobile devices.

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Efficiently Simplifying Navigation, Part 2: Navigation Systems

How do we make navigation as simple and predictable as possible? As explained in part 1 of this series, the first two steps are to structure content in a way that naturally narrows the navigation options, and to explain those options in a way that minimizes the cognitive load on users.

Efficiently Simplifying Navigation, Part 2: Navigation Systems

However, two more steps are required — namely, to choose the right type of navigation menu, and then to design it. The second part of this series addresses the third step and discusses which type of navigation menu is best suited to which content.

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Six Common Problems With The UX Process, And Six Solutions!

How robust is your user experience design process? We all have our favored methods and techniques, but the general process is similar: Conduct research, prototype, then present to stakeholders and users.

Six Common Problems With The UX Process, And Six Solutions!

We’ve delivered projects successfully, rectified problems and honed our ability to deliver in different scenarios. However, we all know that every project is unique, and every once in a while something will take you by surprise.

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Stop Wasting Users’ Time

Our users are precious about their time and we must stop wasting it. On each project ask two questions: “Am I saving myself time at the expense of the user?” and “How can I save the user time here?” What is the single most precious commodity in Western society? Money? Status? I would argue it is time.

Stop Wasting Users' Time

We are protective of our time, and with good reason. There are so many demands on it. We have so much to do. So much pressure. People hate to have their time wasted, especially online. We spend so much of our time online these days, and every interaction demands a slice of our time. One minor inconvenience on a website might not be much, but, accumulated, it is death by a thousand cuts.

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