Posts Tagged ‘Workflow’

We are pleased to present below all posts tagged with ‘Workflow’.

Preparing For A Front-End Job Interview

Moving on from your current job or stepping out into the real world once you’ve completed your studies can be daunting. Taking time to do a little preparation goes a long long way. If you come across the perfect job, you will need to portray yourself in the best possible light to show that you are the right person for the position.

Preparing For A Front-End Job Interview

Preparing for an interview as a front-end developer is hard. There is no “standard” interview, and what was relevant last year might no longer be relevant today.

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Starting An Open-Source Project

At Velocity 2011, Nicole Sullivan and I introduced CSS Lint, the first code-quality tool for CSS. We had spent the previous two weeks coding like crazy, trying to create an application that was both useful for end users and easy to modify. Neither of us had any experience launching an open-source project like this, and we learned a lot through the process.

Starting An Open-Source Project

After some initial missteps, the project finally hit a groove, and it now regularly get compliments from people using and contributing to CSS Lint. It’s actually not that hard to create a successful open-source project when you stop to think about your goals.

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Workflow OptimizationDesign Cutting Edge iOS Apps With Adobe Fireworks

Since the release of iPhone 4 and the iPad 3 (known as "The new iPad"), Apple has doubled the resolution of the displays, which are now 640 x 960 pixels (iPhone 4 and 4s), 1536 x 2048 pixels (iPad 3), and 640 x 1136 pixels (iPhone 5).

Design Cutting Edge iOS Apps With Adobe Fireworks

To keep a good-looking user interface for both the old as well as the "Retina" resolution, Apple decided not to resize all graphics or make use of scalable image formats (such as SVG), but instead it now requires two sets of graphics for each device. When building an app for iOS, you have to provide the normal-sized and double-sized images for each graphic. This is where the strongest Adobe Fireworks feature comes in — the capability to create sharp vector elements which scale up and down without any quality loss.

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An Organizational Structure That Supports Your Digital Presence

Which category does your organization’s Web presence fall into? Over- or under-managed? When it comes to the Web, few organizations have found the Goldilocks zone. Their online activities are either under-managed with minimal policies and procedures, or dogged by bureaucracy and internal politics.

An Organizational Structure That Supports Your Digital Presence

Those that fall into the former category are vulnerable to legal threats, internal disputes and knee-jerk management where the website lurches from one crisis to the next. Those in the latter are crippled by indecision and fail to respond to the fast-changing nature of the Web.

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The Difference Between Good And Bad Job Requirements

In Web design, as one of the seemingly few markets that is actually growing, job opening postings are common. They're not all equally convincing, though. In fact, most of them are unpleasant, uninviting and sometimes bordering on hostile. Some, however, are great, and give you an honest and pleasant sense of what it's like to work at the studio in question, and, in the best cases, what makes a good designer.

On Good And Bad Requirements Lists

By looking at some good and some bad lists of job requirements, I'll explore some of their strengths and weaknesses and try to pinpoint what makes the best lists inviting and honest introductions.

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Encouraging Better Client Participation In Responsive Design Projects

Last week at the fabulous Smashing Conference in Freiburg, I gave a new talk, one I’d written just a few hours prior. I chose not to use slides, but instead to speak about three things that I’m incredibly enthusiastic about: Responsive design is not (just) a design or development problem; the client participation process is broken; how to call your client an idiot, to their face. Here are the (slightly expanded) notes that I made before my talk.

In all the excitement about responsive Web design over the last few years, someone forgot to tell our bosses and clients, so we’ve been treating responsive design like it’s a design or an implementation problem, whereas in fact it’s as much an issue for business. In fact, it’s an issue for everyone involved: designers, developers, content specialists, the people who commission websites and those who structure the teams who make the websites.

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Typography Carved In Stone

Every name here is a tragic story of loss and heartbreak. The Garda Memorial Garden, or Gairdín Cuimhneacháin an Gharda Síochána, is located in the heart of Dublin city. This memorial is a contemplative garden with large stone plinths and a lot of names and numbers. The list of names, this “roll of honor,” records individual police officers (gardaí) who have lost their lives violently and tragically in the line of duty since the formation of the Irish state in 1921.

Carved In Stone

This article offers insight into the creative thought processes I followed in designing a typographic solution for this memorial. I’ll discuss my choice of typeface, my detailed layout, the size of type, the materials, the process of engraving, and leaving open the possibility to add names in the future. My objective was to keep a sense of visual harmony throughout the design, while aiming for a certain consistency in the future engraving of names, regardless of language.

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