Posts Tagged ‘Workflow’

We are pleased to present below all posts tagged with ‘Workflow’.

WordPress Performance Improvements That Can Go Wrong

If you've searched recently for tips on optimizing WordPress’ performance, then you have definitely come across various techniques that people recommend.

WordPress Performance Improvements That Can Go Wrong

These include all sorts of caching mechanisms, such as reverse proxies, object caching and cache plugins, CSS minification, using sprites for images, and so on. All of them are viable and effective ways to speed up a WordPress website’s performance. However, be careful when implementing any of these techniques, and always test their effect on your particular website.

Read more...

Are We Thinking About Digital All Wrong?

I want to let you in on a secret — writing a book is a scary experience. You pour your heart into it and then wait for the reaction when it is published. You can be certain of only one thing: You will be criticized.

Are We Thinking About Digital All Wrong?

My book Digital Adaptation will soon be officially released, and I know a lot of clever people are going to disagree with what I have written. They are going to argue that I focus too much on digital and its characteristics and its implications and its impact on business and on the way we work and organize teams, when ultimately digital is just a tool.

Read more...

A Detailed Introduction To Custom Elements

You’ve probably heard all the noise about Web Components and how they’re going to change Web development forever. If you haven’t, you’ve either been living under a rock, are reading this article by accident, or have a full, busy life which doesn’t leave you time to read about unstable and speculative Web technologies. Well, not me.

A Detailed Introduction To Custom Elements

Web Components are a suite of connected technologies aimed at making elements reusable across the Web. The lion’s share of the conversation has been around Shadow DOM, but probably the most transformative technology of the suite is Custom Elements, a method of defining your own elements, with their own behavior and properties.

Read more...

Kickstart Your Project With INIT And Grunt

Whenever you start a project, you have to repeat certain tasks and set up certain structures: create new folders, choose a framework, set up your development tasks. But configuring settings once and reusing them would be simpler.

Kickstart Your Project With INIT And Grunt

An easy way to achieve this is by using some kind of generator — for example, Yeoman Generator — or tools such as INIT, which can perfectly coexist with and even be used through a generator.

Read more...

How To Make An Effective Style Guide With Adobe Fireworks

I started with style guides like any other obsessive-compulsive designer: with the desire to make it simple to maintain and grow a design. Plus, knowing which component to use in a given situation is nice, too, right? Since making this a regular practice, I’ve found it’s been like having a nice combination of a CSS class and a pattern library all in one.

How To Make An Effective Style Guide With Adobe Fireworks

One of the first questions, understandably, is why use Fireworks for a style guide? Well, for me, it’s mostly because of symbols and styles. Sure, you could use similar things in Photoshop, but I find Fireworks’ implementation to be smarter.

Read more...

Smashing Book #4: Behind The Scenes

If you’re a graphic designer, you will often have to work with off-the-shelf material created by others — for instance, combining ready-to-use fonts with images from a photographer or stock website. Also, you’ll often have to follow the branding already developed by someone else.

Smashing Book #4: Behind The Scenes

It’s OK; it’s a part of the job, and you shouldn’t be bothered by it. But the part of a project that almost every graphic designer likes and is proud of the most is something that you can do from scratch, something that you have control over and can sign off on confidently: illustration.

Read more...

So You’ve Decided To Open-Source A Project At Work. What Now?

A while back, I wrote a post about starting an open-source project. The focus of that article was on starting an open-source project as an individual. I received a lot of positive feedback and also some questions about how the process changes when you’re open-sourcing a project at work.

A guide on getting started with an open-source project at work.

Many companies are starting to investigate and participate in the open-source community, and yet few guides for doing so exist. This article focuses primarily on the process of open-sourcing a project at work, which brings with it other concerns and decisions.

Read more...

↑ Back to top