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We use ad-blockers as well, you know. We gotta keep those servers running though. Did you know that we publish useful books and run friendly conferences — crafted for pros like yourself? E.g. our upcoming SmashingConf London, dedicated to all things web performance.

Author:

Chris Ashton, B.Eng. (Hons) MBCS, is a Web Developer working for the BBC Visual Journalism team in New Broadcasting House, London. When he's not busy coding, he enjoys singing as a tenor in the BBC Symphony Chorus.

Twitter: Follow Chris Ashton on Twitter

High-Impact, Minimal-Effort Cross-Browser Testing

Cross-browser testing is time-consuming and laborious. This, in turn, makes it expensive and prone to human error… so, naturally, we want to do as little of it as possible. This is not a statement we should be ashamed of. Developers are lazy by nature: adhering to the DRY principle, writing scripts to automate things we’d otherwise have to do by hand, making use of third-party libraries — being lazy is what makes us good developers.

High-Impact, Minimal-Effort Cross-Browser Testing

The traditional approach to cross-browser testing doesn’t align well with these ideals. Either you make a half-hearted attempt at manual testing or you expend a lot of effort on doing it “properly”: testing in all of the major browsers used by your audience, gradually moving to older or more obscure browsers in order to say you’ve tested them.

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