Menu Search
Jump to the content X X
Smashing Conf San Francisco

We use ad-blockers as well, you know. We gotta keep those servers running though. Did you know that we publish useful books and run friendly conferences — crafted for pros like yourself? E.g. upcoming SmashingConf San Francisco, dedicated to smart front-end techniques and design patterns.

Author:

Christian Krammer is a web-designer from Austria, who lives there with his wife and 10-years old son. He was an avid Photoshop user once, but as soon as he got a Mac he switched over to Sketch and never went back again. Since then he literally lives in the design app and knows it inside out. Christian has designed everything you can imagine in Sketch, from websites to apps and icons, even print material.

He shares his knowledge about the application on sketchtips.info now for almost three years and has helped countless designers to become more versatile in the design app. His Sketch courses on Skillshare also supported many to brush up their skills. Christian is the author of “The Sketch Handbook”, that was released recently from Smashing Magazine. It features everything you ever wanted to know about designing with Sketch on 376 pages.

When he’s not tinkering around with Sketch he enjoys to do some sports or watch a good movie. By the way, his all-time favorite is Fight Club. Family and nature are very important for Christian and he loves to spend time outdoors.

Twitter: Follow Christian Krammer on Twitter

How To Create A Realistic Clock In Sketch

Creating a clock in Sketch might not sound exciting at first, but we'll discover how easy it is to recreate real-world objects in a very accurate way. You'll learn how to apply multiple layers of borders and shadows, you'll take a deeper look at gradients and you will see how objects can be rotated and duplicated in special ways. To help you along the way you can also download the Sketch editable file.

How To Create A Realistic Clock In Sketch

This is a rather advanced tutorial, so if you are not that savvy with Sketch yet and need some help, I would recommend to first read "Design a Responsive Music Player in Sketch" (Part One | Part Two) that cover a few key aspects in detail when working with Sketch. You can also have a look at my personal project sketchtips.info where I regularly provide tips and tricks about Sketch.

Read more...

Designing A Responsive Music Player In Sketch (Part 2)

Welcome to the second part of this tutorial, in which we will finish designing the music player that we started in part one. This includes creating the icons at the bottom, as well as making the music player responsive, so that all elements adapt to the width of the artboard and, thus, can be used for different device widths.

Designing A Responsive Music Player In Sketch (Part 2)

Our premise in creating all of the icons is to use basic shapes as often as possible, instead of custom vector elements. Shapes are much easier to set up and modify, and we will still be able to combine them into more complex forms using Boolean operations.

Read more...

Designing A Responsive Music Player In Sketch (Part 1)

Sketch is known for its tricky, advanced facets, but it's not rocket science. We've got you covered with The Sketch Handbook which is filled with practical examples and tutorials that will help you get the most out of this mighty tool. In today's article, Christian Krammer gives us a little taste of all the impressive designs Sketch is capable of bringing to life. — Ed.

Music plays a big role in my life. For the most part, I listen to music when I'm commuting, but also when I'm exercising or doing some housework. It makes the time fly, and I couldn't imagine living without it.

Designing A Responsive Music Player In Sketch (Part 1)

However, one thing that has always bothered me is that the controls of music apps can be quite small and hard to catch. This can be a major issue, especially in the car, where every distraction matters. Another issue, in particular with the recent redesign of iOS' Music app, is that you can't directly like tracks anymore and instead need to open a separate dialog. And I do that a lot — which means one needless tap for me.

Read more...

How To Set Up A Print Style Sheet

In a time when everyone seems to have a tablet, which makes it possible to consume everything digitally, and the only real paper we use is bathroom tissue, it might seem odd to write about the long-forgotten habit of printing a Web page. Nevertheless, as odd as it might seem to visionaries and tablet manufacturers, we’re still far from the reality of a paperless world. [Links checked February/08/2017]

Infinitum

In fact, tons of paper float out of printers worldwide every day, because not everyone has a tablet yet and a computer isn’t always in reach. Moreover, many of us feel that written text is just better consumed offline. Because I love to cook, sometimes I print recipes at home, or emails and screenshots at work, even though I do so as rarely as possible out of consideration for the environment.

Read more...

The Future Of CSS: Experimental CSS Properties

Despite contemporary browsers supporting a wealth of CSS3 properties, most designers and developers seem to focus on the quite harmless properties such as border-radius, box-shadow or transform. These are well documented, well tested and frequently used, and so it’s almost impossible to not stumble on them these days if you are designing websites.

Screenshot

[fblike]

But hidden deep within the treasure chests of browsers are advanced, heavily underrated properties that don’t get that much attention. Perhaps some of them rightly so, but others deserve more recognition. The greatest wealth lies under the hood of WebKit browsers, and in the age of iPhone, iPad and Android apps, getting acquainted with them can be quite useful.

Read more...
1

↑ Back to top