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We use ad-blockers as well, you know. We gotta keep those servers running though. Did you know that we publish useful books and run friendly conferences — crafted for pros like yourself? E.g. our upcoming SmashingConf London, dedicated to all things web performance.

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Jacob is a web tinkerer and Spartan at Microsoft, standards conciliator, music maker (piano, guitar), music listener (187+ concerts and counting) and general beer enthusiast.

Twitter: Follow Jacob Rossi on Twitter

Google Profile: https://plus.google.com/106990404214725051877/posts

Inside Microsoft’s New Rendering Engine For The “Project Spartan”

Last week, Microsoft made its biggest announcement for the web since it first introduced Internet Explorer in 1995: a new browser, codenamed “Project Spartan.” So, what does this mean for us as designers and developers? What rendering engine will Spartan be using, and how will it affect our work? We spoke with Jacob Rossi, the senior engineer at Microsoft's web platform team, about the new browser, the rendering engine behind it, and whether it's going to replace Internet Explorer in the long run. This article, written by Jacob, is the result of our conversations, with a few insights that you may find quite useful. – Ed.

Project Spartan

Spartan is a project that has been in the making for some time now and over the next few months we’ll continue to learn more about the new browser, what it has to offer users, and what its platform will look like. It will be a matter of few months until users and developers alike will be able to try Spartan for themselves, but we can share some of the interesting bits already today. This article will cover the inside story of the rendering engine powering Spartan, how it came to be, and how 20 years of the Internet Explorer platform (Trident) has helped inform how our team designed it.

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