Menu Search
Jump to the content X X
Smashing Conf Barcelona

You know, we use ad-blockers as well. We gotta keep those servers running though. Did you know that we publish useful books and run friendly conferences — crafted for pros like yourself? E.g. our upcoming SmashingConf Barcelona, dedicated to smart front-end techniques and design patterns.

Author:

Jeremy is a Front End Developer at Papercut Interactive and has a personal blog and portfolio. He is a reader of fiction, watcher of educational television, generally loud-mouthed and opinionated person.

Twitter: Follow Jeremy Hixon on Twitter

Progressive And Responsive Navigation

Developing for the Web can be a difficult yet rewarding job. Given the number of browsers across the number of platforms, it can sometimes be a bit overwhelming. But if we start coding with a little forethought and apply the principles of progressive enhancement from the beginning and apply some responsive practices at the end, we can easily accommodate for less-capable browsers and reward those with modern browsers in both desktop and mobile environments.

Progressive And Responsive Navigation

Resetting our CSS styles is where we’ll start. Browsers have different default styles for the elements we’ll be using, so understanding this and getting all of the elements to look the same is important. In this example, since we’re using an unordered list, there will be default left padding, top and bottom margins, and a list-style.

Read more...

An Introduction To LESS, And LESS Vs Sass

I’ve been using LESS religiously ever since I stumbled upon it months ago. CSS was never really a problem for me, in and of itself, but I was intrigued by the idea of using variables to create something along the lines of a color palette for my websites and themes. Having a color palette with a fixed number of options to choose from helps prevent me from going color crazy and deviating from a chosen style. The main difference between LESS and Sass is the way in which they are processed. LESS is a JavaScript library and is, therefore, processed client-side.

Sass, on the other hand, runs on Ruby and is processed server-side. A lot of developers might not choose LESS because of the additional time needed for the JavaScript engine to process the code and output the modified CSS to the browser. There are a few ways around this. The way I get around it is to use LESS only during the development process. Once I’m finished, I copy and paste the LESS output into a minifier and then into a separate CSS file to be included in place of the LESS files.

Read more...
1

↑ Back to top