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Smashing Conf New York

You know, we use ad-blockers as well. We gotta keep those servers running though. Did you know that we publish useful books and run friendly conferences — crafted for pros like yourself? E.g. our upcoming SmashingConf New York, dedicated to smart front-end techniques and design patterns.

Author:

Jeremy Wagner is a performance-obsessed front end developer, author and speaker living and working in the frozen wastes of Saint Paul, Minnesota. He is also the author of the Manning Publications book Web Performance in Action, a web developer's companion guide for creating fast websites. You can find him on Twitter @malchata, or read his blog of ramblings.

Twitter: Follow Jeremy Wagner on Twitter

A Comprehensive Guide To HTTP/2 Server Push

The landscape for the performance-minded developer has changed significantly in the last year or so, with the emergence of HTTP/2 being perhaps the most significant of all. No longer is HTTP/2 a feature we pine for. It has arrived, and with it comes server push!

A Guide To HTTP/2 Server Push

Aside from solving common HTTP/1 performance problems (e.g., head of line blocking and uncompressed headers), HTTP/2 also gives us server push! Server push allows you to send site assets to the user before they've even asked for them. It’s an elegant way to achieve the performance benefits of HTTP/1 optimization practices such as inlining, but without the drawbacks that come with that practice.

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Next Generation Server Compression With Brotli

Chances are pretty good that you’ve worked with, or at least understand the concept of, server compression. By compressing website assets on the server prior to transferring them to the browser, we’ve been able to achieve substantial performance gains.

Next Generation Server Compression With Brotli

For quite some time, the venerable gzip algorithm has been the go-to solution for reducing the size of page assets. A new kid on the block has been gaining support in modern browsers, and its name is Brotli. In this article, you’ll get hands-on with Brotli by writing a Node.js-powered HTTP server that implements this new algorithm, and we’ll compare its performance to gzip.

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