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Smashing Conf San Francisco

We use ad-blockers as well, you know. We gotta keep those servers running though. Did you know that we publish useful books and run friendly conferences — crafted for pros like yourself? E.g. upcoming SmashingConf San Francisco, dedicated to smart front-end techniques and design patterns.

Author:

Matthew Ray is a full-stack web developer working for the worldwide public relations firm, Weber Shandwick. He currently focusses his efforts on product development, plugin architecture, and service integration. In his free time, Matthew is an avid photographer, musician and bulldog enthusiast.

Twitter: Follow Matthew Ray on Twitter

Three Approaches To Adding Configurable Fields To Your WordPress Plugin

Anyone who has created a WordPress plugin understands the need to create configurable fields to modify how the plugin works. There are countless uses for configurable options in a plugin, and nearly as many ways to implement said options. You see, WordPress allows plugin authors to create their own markup within their settings pages. As a side effect, settings pages can vary greatly between plugins.

In this article we are going to go over three common ways you can make your plugin configurable. We will start by creating a settings page and create our fields using the default WordPress Settings API. I will then walk you through how to set up your fields with a custom handler. Finally, I will show you how to integrate a great configurable fields plugin Advanced Custom Fields (ACF) into your own plugin.

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How To Deploy WordPress Plugins With GitHub Using Transients

If you've worked with WordPress for a while, you may have tried your hand at writing a plugin. Many developers will start creating plugins to enhance a custom theme or to modularize their code. Eventually, though, you may want to distribute your plugin to a wider audience.

Deploy WordPress Plugins With GitHub Using Transients

While you always have the option to use the WordPress Subversion repository, there may be instances where you prefer to host a plugin yourself. Perhaps you are offering your users a premium plugin. Maybe you need a way to keep your client's code in sync across multiple sites. It could simply be that you want to use a Git workflow instead of Subversion. Whatever the reason, this tutorial will show you how to set up a GitHub repository to push updates to your plugin, wherever it resides.

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