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Smashing Conf New York

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Author:

Yoav Weiss does not get discouraged easily and is not afraid of code. He is a Web performance and browser internals specialist, especially interested in the intersection between Responsive Web Design and Web performance. He has implemented the various responsive images features in Blink and WebKit as part of the Responsive Images Community Group, and is currently working at Akamai, focused on making the Web platform faster. You can follow his rants on Twitter or have a peek at his latest prototypes on Github. When he's not writing code, he's probably slapping his bass, mowing the lawn in the French countryside or playing board games with the kids.

Twitter: Follow Yoav Weiss on Twitter

Preload: What Is It Good For?

Preload (spec) is a new web standard aimed at improving performance and providing more granular loading control to web developers. It gives developers the ability to define custom loading logic without suffering the performance penalty that script-based resource loaders incur.

Preload: What is it good for?

A few weeks ago, I shipped preload support in Chrome Canary, and barring unexpected bugs it will hit Chrome stable in mid-April. But what is that preload thing? What does it do? And how can it help you?

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Responsive Image Container: A Way Forward For Responsive Images?

The aim of republishing the original article by Yoav is to raise awareness and support the discussion about solutions for responsive images. We look forward to your opinions and thoughts in the comments section! – Ed.

It’s been a year since I last wrote about it, but the dream of a “magical” image format that will solve world hunger and/or the responsive images problem (whichever comes first) lives on. A few weeks back, I started wondering if such an image format could be used to solve both the art direction and resolution-switching use cases.

Responsive Image Container: A Way Forward For Responsive Images?

I had a few ideas on how this could be done, so I created a prototype to prove its feasibility. The prototype is now available, ready to be tinkered with. In this post, I’ll explain what this prototype does, what it cannot do, how it works, and its advantages and disadvantages relative to markup solutions.

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Bandwidth Media Queries? We Don’t Need ’Em!

From time to time, when a discussion is taking place about ways to implement responsive images, someone comes along and says, “Hey, guys! What we really need is a media query that enables us to send high-resolution images to people on a fast connection and low-resolution images to people on a slow connection.” At least early on, a lot of people agreed.

Media query download tests

At first glance, this makes a lot of sense. High-resolution images have a significant performance cost, because they take longer to download. On a slow network connection, that cost can have a negative impact on the user’s experience.

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