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Category: Coding

This extended category features articles on client-side and server-side programming languages, tools, frameworks and libraries, as well as back-end issues. Experts and professionals reveal their coding tips, tricks and ideas. Curated by Dudley Storey and Rey Bango.
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Retrofitting Zooming UI To Legacy Websites: An Impossible Task?

It’s well known that, in the ’80s, Microsoft and Apple made the graphical user interface (GUI), the dominant interface on desktop computers. What’s less known is that the GUI, whose navigation is based on pages and links, is not the only possible interface. And we know that finding our way in a modern GUI, whether for a website or application, is not always easy.

Retrofitting ZUIs To Legacy Websites: An Impossible Task?

One problem is of design, meaning that an interface could simply be poorly designed. But a different problem may very well be the way our brains are wired; even well-designed interfaces can be difficult to navigate and use.

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Battling BEM (Extended Edition): 10 Common Problems And How To Avoid Them

Whether you’ve just discovered BEM or are an old hand (in web terms anyway!), you probably appreciate what a useful methodology it is. If you don’t know what BEM is, I suggest you read about it on the BEM website before continuing with this post, because I’ll be using terms that assume a basic understanding of this CSS methodology.

Battling BEM (Extended Edition): 10 Common Problems And How To Avoid Them

This article aims to be useful for people who are already BEM enthusiasts and wish to use it more effectively or people who are curious to learn more about it. Now, I’m under no illusion that this is a beautiful way to name things. It’s absolutely not. One of things that put me off of adopting it for such a long time was how eye-gougingly ugly the syntax is. The designer in me didn’t want my sexy markup cluttered with dirty double-underscores and foul double-hyphens.

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Smart Responsive Design Patterns, Or When Off-Canvas Isn’t Good Enough

Design patterns often have a bad reputation. They are often considered to be quick, lazy, off-the-shelf solutions that are applied blindly without consideration of the context of a problem. Solutions such as the almighty off-canvas navigation, the floating label pattern or carousels for featured products are some of the prominent ones.

Smart Responsive Design Patterns, Or When Off-Canvas Isn't Good Enough

This article isn’t about these patterns, though. This article features some of the slightly more obscure design patterns, such as responsive car-builder interfaces, mega dropdown navigation, content grids, maps and charts, as well as responsive art direction. Please note that this article isn’t technical; it explores interesting UX patterns out in the wild, rather than code samples. Beware: You will not be able to unsee what you are about to see, and that’s probably a good thing.

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Stylelint: The Style Sheet Linter We’ve Always Wanted

Everyone wants a clean, consistent code base, no matter the language. Developers are accustomed to setting up linters in programming languages such as JavaScript and Python, but they rarely use a linter for style sheets. In this article, we’ll look at stylelint, a linter for style sheets.

Stylelint: The Style Sheet Linter We've Always Wanted

We will also learn why linting a style sheet matters, how stylelint brings order to a style sheet and how we can avoid errors. Finally, we will learn how to use stylelint and start linting as soon as possible. Let's start with why linting is important.

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Developing Dependency Awareness

I’m sure you’ve heard the proverb, “A chain is only as strong as its weakest link,” probably many times. Its written origin dates back to the 18th century, but I wouldn’t be surprised if it was much, much older. And though the work we do has little to do with actual chains, this proverb is every bit as relevant to us.

Developing Dependency Awareness

Remember when Azer Koçulu unpublished more than 250 of his modules from npm (Node Package Manager)? If that name doesn’t ring a bell, perhaps this function name will: left-pad. In case you’re still scratching your head wondering what the heck I’m talking about, Azer removed a bunch of functions from the canonical library of reusable Node.js code and, in doing so, brought thousands of projects to their knees, including high-profile ones like Babel and React.

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Understanding The CSS Property Value Syntax

The World Wide Web Consortium uses a particular syntax to define the possible values that can be used for all CSS properties. You may have seen this syntax in action if you have ever looked at a CSS specification.

Understanding The CSS Property Value Syntax

Let's take a look: <'border-­image-­slice'> = [<number> | <percentage>]{1,4} && fill? This syntax can be hard to understand if you don’t know the various symbols and how they work. However, it is worth taking the time to learn. If you understand how the W3C defines property values, you will be able to understand any of the W3C’s CSS specifications.

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Web Image Effects Performance Showdown

As browsers constantly improve their graphical rendering abilities, the ability to truly design within them is becoming more of a reality. A few lines of code can now have quick and dramatic visual impact, and allow for consistency without a lot of effort. And as with most things in web development, there are often many ways to achieve the same effect.

Web Image Effects Performance Showdown

In this post, we'll take a look at one of the most popular image effects, grayscale, and assess both the ease of implementation and performance implications of HTML canvas, SVG, CSS filters, and CSS blend modes. Which one will win?

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Sponsored Post Looking Back: One Year Of Microsoft Edge (Videos)

Change is difficult in large corporations. But sometimes it is possible. In fact, we published Inside Microsoft’s New Rendering Engine For The “Project Spartan” when the new browser was just announced. A year has passed since then. We kindly thank Microsoft for keeping Smashing Magazine alive and supporting the community with technical articles on practical JavaScript techniques, open source projects and interoperability best practices. Our editors are working with Microsoft engineers to deliver useful insights to you. — Ed.

microsoft-edge-browser-usage-share-preview

In 2015, Microsoft launched its first new browser in 20 years: Microsoft Edge. After eight months, it's on a great trajectory for web standards support, but there are many exciting features to come. This article is part of the web development series from our tech evangelists and engineers on JavaScript skills, community projects and best practices including Microsoft Edge browser and the new EdgeHTML rendering engine.

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The Safari Problem With SVG Sprites (Now Fixed)

Update (19.05.2016): The bug was just fixed by Antti Koivisto and has landed in the current update of iOS (9.3.2) and Safari for OS X 9.1.1 (11601.6.17). When a user visits a site using a SVG sprite in a browser with an empty cache, the sprite is cached and will not be loaded multiple times any longer. You'll find more details here (in German), and Sven Wolfermann's results before and after the iOS update.

Using external SVG sprite maps to deliver lossless scalable vector images is widely used in responsive web design today and well-supported by tools like svg4everybody.

The Problem With Using SVG-Sprites

At German newspaper Zeit Online, we embraced this technique quite a lot. However, we recently changed this workflow back to completely inlining the SVG into the HTML owing to a bug in Apple's Safari browsers (mobile since iOS 9.3, in Mac OS X since Safari 9.1) – the same way GitHub is doing with its octicons.

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