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Smashing Conf New York

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Category: Coding

This extended category features articles on client-side and server-side programming languages, tools, frameworks and libraries, as well as back-end issues. Experts and professionals reveal their coding tips, tricks and ideas. Curated by Dudley Storey and Rey Bango.
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A Responsive Material Design App With Polymer Starter Kit

One upcoming technology that represents a big leap forward in making the web a mature application platform is web components. From a high-level perspective, web components will enable better composability, reusability and interoperability of front-end web application elements by providing a common way to write components in HTML.

A Responsive Material Design App With Polymer Starter Kit

The goal of this article is to show you why this will be such an important step, by showing off what can be accomplished right now using Polymer. Polymer is currently the most advanced and (self-proclaimed) production-ready library based on web components.

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Building Web Software With Make

Most web developers use a build tool of some sort nowadays. I’m not refering to continuous integration software like Jenkins CI (a very popular build system), but the lower-level software it uses to actually acquire dependencies and construct your applications with.

Building Software With Make

There is a dizzying array of options to choose from: Apache Ant (XML-based), Rake (Ruby-based), Grunt (JS-based), Gulp (JS-based), Broccoli (JS-based), NPM (JS-based), Good ol’ shell scripts (although no real orchestration around it). The build tool I want to look at in more detail here though is the granddaddy of them all: Make.

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Introducing RAIL: A User-Centric Model For Performance

There’s no shortage of performance advice, is there? The elephant in the room is the fact that it’s challenging to interpret: Everything comes with caveats and disclaimers, and sometimes one piece of advice can seem to actively contradict another. Phrases like “The DOM is slow” or “Always use CSS animations” make for great headlines, but the truth is often far more nuanced.

RAIL Performance Model

Take something like loading time, the most common performance topic by far. The problem with loading time is that some people measure Speed Index, others go after first paint, and still others use body.onload, DOMContentLoaded or perhaps some other event. It’s rarely consistent. When it comes to other ways to measure performance, you’ve probably seen enough JavaScript benchmarks to last a lifetime. You may have also heard that 60 FPS matters. But when? All the time? Seems unrealistic.

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ESLint: The Next-Generation JavaScript Linter

It was the summer of 2013 and I was working on a project for my employer, Box. I had just finished wiring up JSDoc as a nightly build using a plugin to detect T3 patterns in our code and document them automatically. It occurred to me that these patterns might be easy to get wrong, and I started looking for a way to automatically detect incorrect patterns. I immediately turned to JSHint because we were already using it and I thought it could support plugins. Unfortunately, it could not.

ESlint

Still, I couldn’t get the idea of a linter with pluggable runtime rules out of my head. I had just spent a bunch of time learning about Esprima and abstract syntax trees (ASTs), and I thought to myself, “It can’t be all that hard to create a pluggable JavaScript linter using an AST.” It was from those initial thoughts that ESLint was born.

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Mobile Navigation For Smashing Magazine: A Case Study

Since we started plodding around on this rock in space, human beings have always been dissatisfied with their environment — which is (mostly) a good thing. Otherwise we might still live in caves, fearful of the weather and worshipping the sun. It's dissatisfaction and curiosity which drive us to fix things that ain't broken.

Mobile Navigation For Smashing Magazine: A Case Study

Back in spring 2013, Smashing Magazine sported a <select> menu as its mobile navigation. It wasn't considered an anti-pattern back then and I still think it's a viable solution to the complex problem of how to build accessible and functional cross-device navigation. Brad Frost wrote a few words about the pros and cons of this pattern on his blog and I couldn't agree more.

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HTTPS Everywhere With Nginx, Varnish And Apache

The web is moving toward using HTTPS encryption by default. This move has been encouraged by Google, which announced that HTTPS would be a ranking signal. However, moving your website to HTTPS is good for other reasons, too.

HTTPS Everywhere With Nginx, Varnish And Apache

Rather than debate those reasons, this article assumes you have already decided to move to HTTPS. We’ll walk through how to move your website to HTTPS, taking advantage of Varnish Cache.

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Creating Cel Animations With SVG

What if I told you there was an image format like GIF, but it worked with vectors? What if I said it was possible to reverse the direction of its animation? What if you could take one base image and animate different parts of it separately, at different speeds? Well, the image format, SVG, already exists. It just needs a little gentle encouragement.

Creating Cel Animations With SVG

In this article, I’ll be mixing old with new, taking a somewhat primitive art and breathing new life into it. With the help of Sass, I’ll be streamlining the necessary workflow and hopefully demonstrating that automation can, sometimes, be a friend to creativity.

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A Guide To Building SVG Maps From Natural Earth Data

Interactive maps are a fantastic way to present geographic data to your visitors. Libraries like Google Maps and Open Street Maps are a popular choice to do this and they excel at visualizing street-level data. However, for small-scale maps, SVG maps are often a better option. They are lightweight, fully customizable and are not encumbered by any licensing restrictions.

A Guide To Making SVG Maps From Natural Earth Data

It's possible to find a number of SVG maps released under permissible licenses in the Wikimedia Commons. Unfortunately, it's likely that you will eventually find these options lacking. The map you need may not exist, may be out of date (as borders change), or may not be well-formatted for web use. This article will explain how to create your own SVG maps using Natural Earth data and open source tools. You will then be able to create SVG maps of any area of the world, using any projection, at any resolution. As an illustration, we will create an SVG world map.

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Principles Of HTML5 Game Design

Visual effects in games define their overall look and feel, and gameplay. Players are attracted to high visual quality, which generate more traffic and reach. It’s key for creating successful games and providing a lot of fun for players.

Principles Of HTML5 Game Design

In this article I want to present a few ideas of how to implement different visual effects in <canvas>-based HTML5 games. These examples will be based on effects we made in our game, Skytte. I will explain the basic ideas supporting them and provide the effects used in our work.

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