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Smashing Conf New York

We use ad-blockers as well, you know. We gotta keep those servers running though. Did you know that we publish useful books and run friendly conferences — crafted for pros like yourself? E.g. upcoming SmashingConf New York, dedicated to smart front-end techniques and design patterns.

Website Layout Tools Compared: Flexbox Vs. Susy

Flexbox has become one of the most popular tools for creating website layouts. Susy is another layout tool that has gained popularity with the Sass community over the last few years.

Website Layout Tools Compared: Flexbox Vs. Susy

Many developers I’ve spoken with are unsure which tool is best for creating layouts for their websites. Some feel that flexbox is powerful enough to handle all of their layout problems. However, they are unsure whether to learn it because of its confusing syntax. Others feel that Susy is much simpler and prefer its simplicity to flexbox.

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Making Accessibility Simpler, With Ally.js

I’ve been a web developer for 15 years, but I’d never looked into accessibility. I didn’t know enough people with (serious) disabilities to properly understand the need for accessible applications and no customer has ever required me to know what ARIA is. But I got involved with accessibility anyway – and that’s the story I’d like to share with you today.

Making Accessibility Simpler

At the Fronteers Conference in October 2014 I saw Heydon Pickering give a talk called “Getting nowhere with CSS best practices”. Among other things, he made a case for using WAI-ARIA attributes like aria-disabled="true" instead of classes like .is-disabled to express application state. It struck me then and there that I was missing out on a few well-prepared standards, simply because ARIA belongs to that accessibility space that I had no idea of.

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Web Development Reading List #116

What’s going on in the industry? What new techniques have emerged recently? What insights, tools, tips and tricks is the web design community talking about? Anselm Hannemann is collecting everything that popped up over the last week in his web development reading list so that you don’t miss out on anything. The result is a carefully curated list of articles and resources that are worth taking a closer look at. — Ed.

Web Development Reading List #116: Chakra, Credential Leaks and What Makes a Function Asynchronous

You probably haven't bought your Christmas presents yet. Usually we feel the need to buy a gift for friends and family. It often lets us buy random stuff that is often of no real value. Turning this around, I started to enjoy the evening with a hand-made dinner, small hand-made gifts and enough time for the loved ones. So far, this worked way better than any gift I've ever bought in a store. So don’t stress yourself if you haven’t found anything yet — time, attention and doing things together can also be a great gift. Have a nice weekend!

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Why Performance Matters, Part 3: Tolerance Management

When technical performance optimizations reach certain limits, psychology and perception management might help us to push the limits further. Waiting can consist of active and passive phases; for the user to perceive a wait as a shorter one, we increase the active phase and reduce the passive phase of the wait. But what do we do when the event is a purely passive wait, with no active phase at all? Can we push the limits even further?

Why Performance Matters, Part 3: Tolerance Management

Waits without an active phase happen quite often in the offline world: waiting in a checkout line to the till, waiting for a bus, queuing in an amusement park, and so on. It is widely accepted that the longer the user has to wait, the more negative the reaction to the wait. User reaction to a wait online is no different from that in the offline world. Studies based on the analysis of more than a thousand cases identify 14 distinct types of waiting situations on the web. Being dependent on our users' loyalty, we cannot leave them facing a passive wait.

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Introducing Term Meta Data In WordPress And How To Use Them

WordPress 4.4 introduced term meta data which allows you to save meta values for terms in a similar way to post meta data. This is a highly anticipated and logical addition to the WordPress system.

Introducing Term Meta Data In WordPress And How To Use Them

So far, the post and comment meta systems allowed us to add arbitrary data to posts and comments. This can be used to add ratings to comments, indicate your mood while you were writing a post, attach prices to product posts, and various other information you think is relevant to your content. As of the newest version of WordPress, meta data can now be added to terms which allows us to create features like default category thumbnails in a standardized way. This tutorial will show you how you can edit, update and retrieve these meta data for terms.

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Lessons Learned In Big App Development, A Hawaiian Airlines Case Study

Having spent over two years making it, we just pressed the “Ship” button on the new Hawaiian Airlines website. It has been the biggest project of my career, and I’ve worked with the most talented team I’ve ever worked with.

Lessons Learned In Big App Development

Everything was rebuilt from the ground up: hardware, features, back-end APIs, front end, and UX and design. It was a rollercoaster ride like no other, but we have prevailed and built what I believe to be one of the best airline-booking experiences on the web. Yes, humble, I know!

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An Introduction To PostCSS

The development of CSS, like all languages, is an iterative process. With every major release, we get new features and syntaxes that help us write our styles. CSS Level 3 introduced features that enable us to design interactions that previously were possible only with JavaScript. With every new day, tools emerge to make styling easier and more flexible.

An Introduction To PostCSS

One of the relatively recent tools introduced for styling is PostCSS. PostCSS aims to reinvent CSS with an ecosystem of custom plugins and tools. Working with the same principles of preprocessors such as Sass and LESS, it transforms extended syntaxes and features into modern, browser-friendly CSS.

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Web Development Reading List #115

What’s going on in the industry? What new techniques have emerged recently? What insights, tools, tips and tricks is the web design community talking about? Anselm Hannemann is collecting everything that popped up over the last week in his web development reading list so that you don’t miss out on anything. The result is a carefully curated list of articles and resources that are worth taking a closer look at. — Ed.

PHP7 is here

Winter isn’t here yet, instead as you’re reading this, I’m out for another biking session in the mountains today. You might already have noticed how important nature is to me. So this week, seeing the international climate conference in Paris not aiming for an ambitious goal, a reader sent me this great article in which he questions what we as people in the tech industry can personally do against global warming. If you’re caring only a bit about this, read it and think about it. Have a great week and try out some of the amazing web development stuff I collected for you this week.

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Getting Back Into The (Right) Deliverables Business

“Get out of the deliverables business” has become quite a mantra in the lean startup and UX movements. There’s much to love in that sentiment — after all, for every wireframe you make, you’re not shipping code to customers.

The first wireframe

But I’m worried that, just like with the concept of a minimum viable product, we’ve taken this sound advice to an extreme that’s actually hurtful to the creation of good products. What follows is an account of my own journey in navigating these stormy design seas together with the community.

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