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How To Create And Customize A WordPress Child Theme

The WordPress platform is a magnet for those who want to take matters into their own hands, who want complete control over their websites and want to be independent in running them. WordPress does make it really easily to completely customize a website. If you have a bit of knowledge of HTMl, CSS and/or PHP, there is nothing you can’t change.

How To Create And Customize A WordPress Child Theme

I mean, just compare the default themes, Twenty Fifteen and Twenty Fourteen. Hard to believe they are running on the same platform, isn’t it? Therefore, it is only natural for you to want to adapt the look of your website to fit your vision. I doubt there are many WordPress users out there who don’t constantly think about what to implement next. However, a problem arises.

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Designing for Kids Is Not Child’s Play

Chances are you’ve seen it: a child glued to a tablet or smartphone, swiping fearlessly with small, sticky fingers. From airports and restaurants, to homes and even schools, mobile devices are a ubiquitous part of childhood today. Apple launched a curated ‘Kids’ category in the App Store last year that already has more than 80,000 apps.

Sesame Street Touch & Learn TV

With so many apps for kids out there, you may have considered designing one yourself. “How hard could designing for kids be?” you might think. Well, don’t let appearances deceive you. Despite their simple storylines and silly soundtracks, designing for kids is serious business. It’s not just taking grown-up content and dumbing it down. In fact, there are many reasons why designing for kids is actually more difficult than designing for adults.

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The Issue With Global Node Packages

Node.js brought about a great revolution for JavaScript developers by allowing us to write code that runs directly on our machines; our skills were no longer limited to browsers alone. At first, many of us simply saw this as a way to write our application servers without needing to learn another language, but we all quickly caught on to the fact that we could also write tools for the command line that automate a lot of things in our development cycles.

The Issue With Global Node Packages

npm, which is bundled with Node.js, made this even easier by giving us quick and easy access to tools that others have created, which we install on our machines to access from wherever we are in our system. JavaScript was finally a “real” programming language. But with these new capabilities came a lot of best practices that needed to be discovered, because there were many new scenarios that wouldn’t be found in the browser. In particular, I’d like to discuss a practice that has been on my mind a lot lately that I think much of the community needs to evaluate.

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Leaner Responsive Images With Client Hints

Responsive images have been around long enough for most of us to have taken them for a spin, or at least to have learned from the experiences of those who have. Beyond doubt, the responsive images specification is a great win for the web. However, quite a few reports from the front lines suggest that responsive images can become pretty ugly.

Responsive Images

The good news is that there is a fix! No, not throwing JavaScript at the challenge, but by asking the web server for a helping hand. Enter Client Hints, an initiative spearheaded by Google that is already available in browsers (Chrome and Opera) and that is super-simple to use. Let’s see how Client Hints can reduce both image size and verbosity of the responsive images markup.

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Web Development Reading List #120: Safari 9.1, Chakra Core Open Sourced, ES6 Object Shorthand Syntax

One thing we should learn to embrace more this year is to enjoy the good things and focus more on the positive news than on the negative. I started to learn more ES6 this year and have scheduled 1 to 2 small learning modules of ES6 and 1 to 2 accessibility features I don’t know yet to study each week.

Can you make the switch to another data center within minutes?

This week, Apple announced the pre-release of Safari 9.1 which will introduce the <picture>-element, Fast Tap on iOS, changes to modal dialogs, CSS Variable support, all, unset, font-variant-* and will-change property support as well as unprefixed CSS filter. Let’s hope that shorter release-cycles are Apple’s new strategy for a more open, more responsive browser culture.

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Nobody Wants To Use Your Product

Every morning, designers wake up to happily work on their products, be they digital or physical, with an inner belief that people will want to use their products and will have a blast doing so. Perhaps that is a slight generalization; however, as designers, we tend to have a natural desire for each project we work on to be the best it can be, to be innovative and, most importantly, to make a difference.

Nobody Wants To Use Your Product

Here is a little revelation. People are not really into using products. Any time spent by a user operating an interface, twisting knobs, pulling levers or tapping buttons is time wasted. Rather, people are more interested in the end result and in obtaining that result in the quickest, least intrusive and most efficient manner possible. And these are two fundamentally different concepts — usage versus results — which, at the very least, differentiate good product design from poor product design or, on a smaller scale, a good feature from a bad one.

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Eliminating Known Vulnerabilities With Snyk

The way we consume open source software (OSS) dramatically changed over the past decade or two. Flash back to the early 2000s, we mostly used large OSS projects from a small number of providers, such as Apache, MySQL, Linux and OpenSSL. These projects came from well-known software shops that maintained good development and quality practices. It wasn’t our code, but it felt trustworthy, and it was safe to assume it didn’t hold more bugs than our own code.

Eliminating Known Vulnerabilities With Snyk

Fast-forward to today and OSS has turned into crowd-sourced marketplaces. Node’s npm carries over 210,000 packages from over 60,000 contributors; RubyGems holds over 110,000 gems, and Maven’s central repository indexes nearly 130,000 artifacts. Packages can be written by anybody, and range from small utilities that convert milliseconds to full-blown web servers. Packages often use other packages in turn, ending with a typical application holding hundreds if not thousands of OSS packages.

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Variables: The Backbone Of CSS Architecture

When they hit the front-end landscape a few years ago, preprocessors were heralded as the saviour of CSS, bringing modularity, meaning and even a degree of sexiness. Terms like “Sass architecture” became commonplace, ushering in a new generation of CSS developers who occasionally went to excess with their new-found power. The results were marvellous, and sometimes undesirable.

Variables: The Backbone Of CSS Architecture

One of the unpleasant side effects was a preprocessor elitism that continues to persist. Neophyte designers who were just getting their hands dirty with CSS were overwhelmed by an influx of must-have tools and confused by the bitter partisan wars in web development forums.

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Why I Moved From A Square To A Circle

They’re probably the most familiar interfaces on the planet: the numeric keypads on our mobile phones and calculators. Yet very few notice that the keypads’ design has remained unchanged for nearly half a century in the face of evolving global design norms and conventions.

Bell Laboratories stayed with the standard square layout in its touchtone phones

Even fewer users notice another startling design feature: the phone’s keypad is the inverted version of the calculator’s. This article explores the roots of this disparity and proposes a better solution. We will discuss how to simplify and adapt a traditional numeric interface to a minimalist design norm by taking advantage of modern touch-driven modes of human–mobile interaction.

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Web Development Reading List #119: Bulletproof Third-Party Content and Progressive Applications

I wish you a happy New Year! But although we write another number now — 2016 — your habits and goals won’t change overnight. That is why I’m not convinced of New Year's resolutions. You should have goals, resolutions and you should try to improve yourself.

SpaceX, the space company by Elon Musk, has created some beautiful posters, advertising traveling to Mars as a tourist destination.

But bear in mind to make these goals reasonable, actually achievable for you, and re-iterate in smaller periods than just once a year. I think that works way better than having one large resolution and then feeling bad because, of course, you failed to reach your big goal. Make the small things count and improve in small steps!

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