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Posts Tagged ‘Essentials’.

We are pleased to present below all posts tagged with ‘Essentials’.

CSS Differences in Internet Explorer 6, 7 and 8

One of the most bizarre statistical facts in relation to browser use has to be the virtual widespread numbers that currently exist in the use of Internet Explorer versions 6, 7 and 8. As of this writing, Internet Explorer holds about a 65% market share combined across all their currently used browsers. In the web development community, this number is much lower, showing about a 40% share.

Screenshot

The interesting part of those statistics is that the numbers across IE6, IE7, and IE8 are very close, preventing a single Microsoft browser from dominating browser stats — contrary to what has been the trend in the past. Due to these unfortunate statistics, it is imperative that developers do thorough testing in all currently-used Internet Explorer browsers when working on websites for clients, and on personal projects that target a broader audience.

This article will attempt to provide an exhaustive, easy-to-use reference for developers desiring to know the differences in CSS support for IE6, IE7 and IE8.

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Mastering CSS Coding: Getting Started

CSS has become the standard for building websites in today's industry. Whether you are a hardcore developer or designer, you should be familiar with it. CSS is the bridge between programming and design, and any Web professional must have some general knowledge of it. If you are getting your feet wet with CSS, this is the perfect time to fire up your favorite text editor and follow along in this tutorial as we cover the most common and practical uses of CSS.

Absolute Position

We’ll start with what you could call the fundamental properties and capabilities of CSS, ones that we commonly use to build CSS-based websites: Padding vs. margin, Floats, Center alignment, Ordered vs. unordered lists, Styling headings, Overflow and Position. Once you are comfortable with the basics, we will kick it up a notch with some neat tricks to build your CSS website from scratch and make some enhancements to it: Background images, Image enhancement, PSD to XHTML conversion.

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Guide to CSS Font Stacks: Techniques and Resources

CSS Font stacks are one of those things that elude a lot of designers. Many stick to the basic stacks Dreamweaver auto-recommends or go even more basic by just specifying a single web-safe font. But doing either of those things means you're missing out on some great typography options. Font stacks can make it possible to show at least some of your visitors your site's typography exactly the way you intend without showing everyone else a default font. Read on for more information on using and creating effective font stacks with CSS.

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There are a huge variety of font stacks recommended. It seems every designer has their own favorites, what they consider to be the "ultimate" font stack. While there is no definitive font stack out there, there are a few things to keep in mind when using or creating your own stacks.

First of all, make sure you always include a generic font family at the end of your font stacks. This way, if for some strange reason the person visiting your site has virtually no fonts installed, at least they won't end up looking at everything in Courier New. Second, there's a basic formula to creating a good font stack: 'Preferred Font', 'Next best thing', 'Something common and sorta close', 'Similar Web-safe', and 'Generic'. There's nothing wrong with having more than one font for any of those, but try to keep your font stack reasonably short (six to ten fonts is a pretty good maximum number).

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The Z-Index CSS Property: A Comprehensive Look

Most CSS properties are quite simple to deal with. Often, applying a CSS property to an element in your markup will have instant results — as soon as you refresh the page, the value set for the property takes effect, and you see the result immediately. Other CSS properties, however, are a little more complex and will only work under a given set of circumstances.

Usejquery.com's Unique Gallery

The z-index property belongs to the latter group. z-index has undoubtedly caused as much confusion and frustration as any other CSS property. Ironically, however, when z-index is fully understood, it is a very easy property to use, and offers an effective method for overcoming many layout challenges.

In this article, we'll explain exactly what z-index is, how it has been misunderstood, and we'll discuss some practical uses for it. We'll also describe some of the browser differences that can occur, particularly in previous versions of Internet Explorer and Firefox. This comprehensive look at z-index should provide developers with an excellent foundation to be able to use this property confidently and effectively.

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Backgrounds In CSS: Everything You Need To Know

Backgrounds are a core part of CSS. They are one of the fundamentals that you simply need to know. In this article, we will cover the basics of using CSS backgrounds, including properties such as background-attachment. We'll show some common tricks that can be done with the background as well as what's in store for backgrounds in CSS 3 (including four new background properties!).

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We have five main background properties to use in CSS 2. They are as follows: background-color, background-image, background-position, background-repeat and background-attachment. These properties can all be merged into one short-hand property: background. One important thing to note is that the background accounts for the contents of the element, including the padding and border. It does not include an element's margin. This works as it should in Firefox, Safari and Opera, and now in IE8. But in IE7 and IE6 the background does not include the border, as illustrated below.

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Mastering CSS, Part 2: Advanced Techniques and Tools

CSS is one of the most basic building blocks of modern web design. It creates the structure and style that surrounds your content and is capable of making your site a joy to use or a pain in the neck. Mastering CSS is one of the most important things a web designer can do, and has really become an essential criteria for being a successful designer.

Menu List with CSS

In Part 1: Styling Design Elements we covered the basics of web design with CSS. In Part 2 we're offering up some more advanced techniques and effects you can achieve with CSS. Everything from creating your own online apps (like calendars) to styling web pages for use with the iPhone to some basics of working with CSS3 is covered here.

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Mastering CSS, Part 1: Styling Design Elements

CSS is one of the most important building blocks of modern web design. Standards demand the use of CSS for formatting and styling pages, and with good reason. It's lighter-weight and capable of much more than older methods like tables.

 Create an Image Rotator with Description (CSS/jQuery)

And CSS isn't nearly as tricky as some people tend to believe. Below are fresh tips and techniques for creating and styling design elements with CSS. They're a good place to start if you're new to CSS but are valuable even if you're a veteran designer. Not all the techniques are strictly CSS; some include integration with JavaScript or XHTML to extend the functionality of your site.

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The Definitive Guide to Using Negative Margins

Since the recommendation of CSS2 back in 1998, the use of tables has slowly faded into the background and into the history books. Because of this, CSS layouts have since then been synonymous with coding elegance.

Negative margins motion on static elements

Out of all the CSS concepts designers have ever used, an award probably needs to be given to the use of Negative Margins as being the most least talked about method of positioning. It’s like an online taboo—everyone’s doing it, yet no one wants to talk about it.

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The Mystery Of CSS Sprites: Techniques, Tools And Tutorials

CSS Sprites are not new. In fact, they are a rather well-established technique and have managed to become common practice in Web development. Of course, CSS sprites are not always necessary, but in some situation they can bring significant advantages and improvements – particularly if you want to reduce your server load. And if you haven't heard of CSS sprites before, now is probably a good time to learn what they are, how they work and what tools can help you create and use the technique in your projects.

CSS Sprites Screenshot

The term "sprite" (similar to "spirit," "goblin," or "elf") has its origins in computer graphics, in which it described a graphic object blended with a 2-D or 3-D scene through graphics hardware. Because the complexity of video games has continually increased, there was a need for smart techniques that could deal with detailed graphic objects while keeping game-play flowing. One of the techniques developed saw sprites being plugged into a master grid (see the image below), then later pulled out as needed by code that mapped the position of each individual graphic and selectively painted it on the screen.

You may want to take a look at the following related posts:

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