Menu Search
Jump to the content X X
The Smashing Book #5

We use ad-blockers as well, you know. We gotta keep those servers running though. Did you know that we publish useful books and run friendly conferences — crafted for pros like yourself? E.g. new Smashing Book 5 features smart responsive design techniques and patterns.

Posts Tagged ‘HTML5’.

We are pleased to present below all posts tagged with ‘HTML5’.

HTML5 And The Document Outlining Algorithm

By now, we all know that we should be using HTML5 to build websites. The discussion now is moving on to how to use HTML5 correctly. One important part of HTML5 that is still not widely understood is sectioning content: section, article, aside and nav. To understand sectioning content, we need to grasp the document outlining algorithm.

Screenshot

Understanding the document outlining algorithm can be a challenge, but the rewards are well worth it. No longer will you agonize over whether to use a section or div element — you will know straight away. Moreover, you will know why these elements are used, and this knowledge of semantics is the biggest benefit of learning how the algorithm works.

Read more...

The Neglected Necessities Of Design

Right now is an exciting time to be in the Web design community. Every month we seem to stumble on a new thought-provoking way to put our expanding tool set to use for our clients and the patrons of the Web. Many designers are chomping at the bit to litter their websites with new CSS, advanced HTML and ultra-engaging JavaScript. By all means, go out and use every last declaration and element you can get your hands on. Abusing, misusing and taking advantage of everything the Web could possibly offer is the best way to learn about what we can and can’t and should and shouldn’t do in future.

screenshot

Whether you are excitedly exploring responsive design, diving headlong into accessibility, building a typographic masterpiece or seeing what level of interactivity you can achieve, all of your Web-based projects should have a common core. All of the new methods being discussed in the design community daily might be overwhelming, but no matter what route you ultimately take, almost any Web project you embark on today should start with solid HTML and logical CSS. This may seem like common sense, but the fact is that very, very few websites today benefit from sensationally optimized HTML and CSS and appropriately applied JavaScript.

Read more...

Dear Clients, The Web Has Changed. It’s Time To Use CSS3 and HTML5 Now.

Since hearing about HTML5 and CSS3, then later reading Hardboiled Web design by Andy Clarke, I have been working on a presentation to help introduce these development methods to my clients. If all i said to them was “these are the latest development methods, but there will be visual differences”, I’m sure you can imagine the response I would receive.

browser differences

Most of the clients I have these days tell me they want the following: HTML to validate as strict or transitional, CSS to validate, site to be Accessibility level 2+ and last but not least, design needs to look the same across all browsers. They have learnt this information from us (developers and agencies) over the last 10 years of us educating the world on best practice. Now we need to re-educate them and it wont be easy! Most people steer away from things they don’t understand out of fear of the unknown.

Read more...

Create An HTML/CSS Mobile Web App Using Sencha Touch

The world of mobile app development is quickly becoming a crowded and complicated space, especially for those outside of the development niche. “Which development platform should I use?” “Do I go native or Web-based?” “Which devices should I plan for?” “Can I build my mobile website by hand or should I use a pre-built package?” The questions are endless.

screenshot

As a designer, my job is to help my clients answer these questions. I try to stay in the category of “knowing enough to be dangerous,” and I keep tabs on the latest mobile development trends, one being the growing popularity of mobile Web apps.

Read more...

Behind The Scenes Of Nike Better World

Perhaps one of the most talked about websites in the last 12 months has been Nike Better World. It's been featured in countless Web design galleries, and it still stands as an example of what a great idea and some clever design and development techniques can produce.

screenshot

In this article, we’ll talk to the team behind Nike Better World to find out how the website was made. We'll look at exactly how it was put together, and then use similar techniques to create our own parallax scrolling website. Finally, we'll look at other websites that employ this technique to hopefully inspire you to build on these ideas and create your own variation.

Read more...

Free HTML5/CSS3 WordPress 3.1+ Theme With Responsive Layout: Yoko

In this post we are glad to present a yet another freebie: a responsive WordPress theme Yoko which was designed by talented designers Ellen and Manuel from Elmastudio and released for the Web design community. Of course, the theme is absolutely free to use in private and commerical projects.

Yoko WordPress theme

Yoko is a modern and flexible WordPress theme. With the responsive layout based on CSS3 media queries, the theme adjusts to different screen sizes. The design is optimized for big desktop screens, tablets and small smartphone screens. To make your blog more individual, you can use the new post formats (like gallery, aside or quote), choose your own logo and header image, customize the background and link color.

Read more...

Syncing Content With HTML5 Video

One of the main changes from HTML4 to HTML5 is that the new specification breaks a few of the boundaries that browsers have been confined to. Instead of restricting user interaction to text, links, images and forms, HTML5 promotes multimedia, from a generic <object> element to a highly specified <video> and <audio> element, and with a rich API to access in pure JavaScript.

Screenshot

[fblike]

Native multimedia capability has a few benefits. For instance, end users have full control over the multimedia. The native controls of browsers allow users to save videos locally or email them to friends. Also, HTML5 video and audio are keyboard-enabled by default, which is a great accessibility benefit.

Read more...

The HTML5 Logo: What Do You Think?

This has been an interesting week for the web design community, to say the least. The W3C revealed a new HTML5 logo to help designers and developers ‘tell the world' that they’re using HTML5. The logo was designed by Ocupop design agency, and it's licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 3.0, a permissive license that allows 'remixing' of the licensed work.

The HTML5 Logo: What Do You Think?

The logo has been made available on stickers and t-shirts, and there’s a gallery already promoting examples of the logo in use. The logo’s official site includes a “badge builder” that customizes its orientation and allows you to add supplementary icons to indicate support for the different technologies that have become associated with HTML5.

Read more...

Falling for HTML5: Finding Love in the Little Things

I've lost count of the number of posts that have been written about the big features of HTML5: amongst the most anticipated being rich media (video, audio, canvas) and JavaScript APIs. However, call me a woman of simple tastes, but this is not the sort of thing that gets me swooning. What does? The small additions to the spec that will make the world of difference to the way I code day-in, day-out. This is the stuff fairy tales are made of.

HTML5 Logo

[fblike]

HTML has had a troubled past. It was never really designed for what we are now accomplishing with it. This is in part a testimony to its flexibility and adaptability, but there have been inevitable growing pains.

So what was it originally intended for? Well it’s there in the name: Hyper-Text Markup Language. Yes, text; hyper-text to be more exact. Not layout, or images, or video, or fonts, or menus — or any of the other frippery that it now incorporates.

Read more...

Why We Should Start Using CSS3 And HTML5 Today

For a while now, here on Smashing Magazine, we have taken notice of how many designers are reluctant to embrace the new technologies such as CSS3 or HTML5 because of the lack of full cross-browser support for these technologies. Many designers are complaining about the numerous ways how the lack of cross-browser compatibility is effectively holding us back and tying our hands — keeping us from completely being able to shine and show off the full scope of our abilities in our work. Many are holding on to the notion that once this push is made, we will wake to a whole new Web — full of exciting opportunities just waiting on the other side. So they wait for this day. When in reality, they are effectively waiting for Godot.

Screenshot

Just like the elusive character from Beckett’s classic play, this day of complete cross-browser support is not ever truly going to find its dawn and deliver us this wonderful new Web where our work looks the same within the window of any and every Web browser. Which means that many of us in the online reaches, from clients to designers to developers and on, are going to need to adjust our thinking so that we can realistically approach the Web as it is now, and more than likely how it will be in the future.

Read more...

↑ Back to top