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Posts Tagged ‘Apps’.

We are pleased to present below all posts tagged with ‘Apps’.

How To Improve Conversions By Localizing An App: A Case Study On “Paper”

When your design looks beautiful and polished, how do you know if it performs well? While it is easy to predict the appeal of a clean and simple UI, design that converts is always a shot in the dark for marketers and designers.

Design App Pages For Better Conversion: Case Study Of Paper By FiftyThree

We worked with the team at FiftyThree to test their app store landing page before they launched ads in China. After tweaking background color, graphics, screenshot order, and localization, we achieved a 33% increase in app page conversion. In this article, I’ll share some ideas about app page design. I'll also argue that dropping your assumptions and testing is the only way to find content that not only looks and reads great, but also helps your bottom line.

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Server-Side Rendering With React, Node And Express

Web applications are everywhere. There is no official definition, but we’ve made the distinction: web applications are highly interactive, dynamic and performant, while websites are informational and less transient. This very rough categorization provides us with a starting point, from which to apply development and design patterns.

Server-Side Rendering With React, Node And Express

These patterns are often established through a different look at the mainstream techniques, a paradigm shift, convergence with an external concept, or just a better implementation. Universal web applications are one such pattern.

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Simple Augmented Reality With OpenCV, Three.js And WebSockets

Augmented reality is generally considered to be very hard to create. However, it's possible to make visually impressive projects using just open source libraries. In this tutorial we'll make use of OpenCV in Python to detect circle-shaped objects in a webcam stream and replace them with 3D Earth in Three.js in a browser window while using WebSockets to join this all together.

Simple Augmented Reality With OpenCV and Three.js

We want to strictly separate front-end and back-end in order to make it reusable. In a real-world application we could write the front-end in Unity, Unreal Engine or Blender, for example, to make it look really nice. The browser front-end is the easiest to implement and should work on nearly every possible configuration.

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Building A First-Class App That Leverages Your Website: A Case Study

Mark Zuckerberg once said, “The biggest mistake that we made, as a company, is betting too much on HTML5 as opposed to native… because it just wasn’t there. And it’s not that HTML5 is bad. I’m actually, long term, really excited about it.” And who wouldn’t be excited by the prospect of a single code base that works across multiple platforms?

The app as a mix of native and web interfaces

Unfortunately, Facebook felt that HTML5 didn’t offer the experience it was looking to build, and that’s what it’s really about: the experience. I believe what Mark was really trying to say was that their biggest mistake was making a technology-driven decision instead of a user experience-driven decision. At the end of the day, we should be making decisions that deliver value to our customers, and sticking to a particular technology is generally not the best way to achieve that.

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Designing Healthcare Apps With Delight

Apps and devices designed to improve people’s health are becoming more pervasive. I serve as VP, Director of User Experience, in the New York office of a global agency with both healthcare and consumer clients. During my 13 years of working in the healthcare space I have never before had such a rich opportunity to directly affect health behavior.

Designing Healthcare Apps With Delight

In this article I’ll guide you through best practices when designing consumer-facing healthcare apps. (We’re not covering medical devices that need to be approved by authorities.) We’ll explore how to plan and conduct research, design moments of delight, integrate data from third-party devices and develop a messaging matrix. We’ll also look at examples of apps live in the wild that have been designed for delight at every moment of interaction.

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Intimate And Interruptive: Designing For The Power Of Apple Watch

“We're all back at square one again.” That was the overwhelming lesson we learned while designing our first major Apple Watch app for launch. To be successful in designing for this device, the entire way we think about app design will need an overhaul.

Intimate And Interruptive: Designing For The Unique Power Of Apple Watch

The patterns and processes that became standard for other devices are of little help here and, in many cases, can actively hinder efforts to create a beautiful, functional and user-centric watch experience.

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Getting Started With Wearables: How To Plan, Build And Design

If a user of your product is buying a smartwatch tomorrow and your app is not compatible with it or your notifications can’t be triggered from there, you might frustrate them. If you have a website or an app today, it’s time to start planning support for wearable devices. In this article, we’ll review the platforms available today, what we can do on each of them, how to plan the architecture, and how to develop apps or companion services for these new devices.

Getting Started With Wearables: How To Plan, Build And Design

Do you remember the shoe phone from Get Smart? If you don’t know what I’m talking about, you are probably too young (or I’m too old). (You can Google it now. Just go; I’ll wait here in this tab.) The shoe phone we saw on TV was followed by many other wearable devices on TV, such as the ones on Knight Rider, The Flintstones, James Bond and Dick Tracy. Many years later, we can say that wearable devices are here and ready to use. We, as designers and developers, need to be ready to develop successful experiences for them.

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Keeping Your Android App Popular After Launch

You’ve launched your app and it’s doing well. You worked hard, kept your initial features lean, and all of your effort has resulted in an app that users like and recommend to friends. So, how do you maintain that momentum and ensure that your app keeps gaining in popularity?

Keeping Your Android App Popular After Launch

This article covers some practical approaches to keeping users interested in and using your app, including talking to your users, keep on launching features, making the first impression count and using all functionalities of the operating system.

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Rapid Cross-OS Mobile App Development: Lessons Learned

Cross-OS mobile app development is often excruciating, between the multiple languages, the different expectations from users about interactions and the sheer development time. Our goal was to cut through the typical pains in the app development process and create a three-platform app in four weeks.

Rapid Cross-OS Mobile App Development: Lessons Learned

We were working with Scripps, an American cable TV media company; their new business development team had been working on concepts for new, rapidly developable (is that a word?) apps. We wanted to prove that app development could be done leanly and agilely by working quickly, eliminating unnecessary clutter, utilizing cross-device user experience similarities and leveraging web views.

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