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Posts Tagged ‘Browsers’.

We are pleased to present below all posts tagged with ‘Browsers’.

5 Powerful Tips And Tricks For Print Style Sheets

Print continues to be treated somewhat cursorily by most Web designers, who tend to be obsessed with pixels rather than printers. In the real world, a significant portion of people rely on pages printed from websites for reference: there’s still something about having a physical sheet of paper in one’s hands, even in this age of digital saturation. [Links checked February/09/2017]

Tips And Tricks For Print Style Sheets

Web developers can take several steps to bridge the gap between the worlds of printers and LCD screens. First, let’s cover the basics. Modern print style sheets are typically placed within a media query.

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From The Server To The Client Client-Side Templating

Using templates in the browser is becoming more and more widespread. Moving application logic from the server to the client, and the increasing usage of MVC-like patterns (model–view–controller) inspired templates to embrace the browser.

Client-Side Templating

This used to be a server-side only affair, but templates are actually very powerful and expressive in client-side development as well. In general, leveraging templates is a great way to separate markup and logic in views, and to maximize code reusability and maintainability. With a syntax close to the desired output (i.e. HTML), you have a clear and fast way to get things done.

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It’s Time To Stop Blaming Internet Explorer

Earlier this week we published two articles by Louis Lazaris: one on why old browsers are holding back the Web and another encouraging Web users to upgrade their browsers and use modern browsers other than IE. This article presents another perspective on this issue. Nicholas C. Zakas, a well-respected member of the developer community, goes into specifics of why we should focus on the good parts of our job so we can tolerate the bad ones and why fixating on circumstances that you can’t change isn’t a recipe for success. Do you share Louis' or Nicholas' view? Leave a comment.—Ed.

A couple of days ago, Smashing Magazine published an article entitled, Old Browsers Are Holding Back The Web. The author of this article, Louis Lazaris, suggests that “old browsers” are holding Web developers back from creating beautiful experiences. Old browsers, in this case, apparently referred to Internet Explorer version 6-9. That’s right, the author groups Internet Explorer 9 into the same group as Internet Explorer 6. He goes on to list some of the things that you can’t use in Internet Explorer 8 and 9.

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Dear Web User: Please Upgrade Your Browser

Shopping. Social networking. Emailing. Reading. Finding directions. Banking. Researching. Those are some of the most common tasks people perform on the World Wide Web. You've probably done all of these things yourself at some point. So if you're like many people, you probably do these things every single week (and many of them even every day).

Dear Web User: Please Upgrade Your Browser

This blog you're reading now, Smashing Magazine, normally publishes content that's intended for graphic designers, Web designers, and Web developers of varying skill levels. But today, this article is for the rest of you—the non-programmers, the everyday Web users.

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Old Browsers Are Holding Back The Web

Because of how far certain Web technologies like HTML5 and CSS3 have brought us, many would say that—from a Web platform perspective—the future is now. Sounds like a cliché, I know. At the very least, it feels like the future is starting to bubble up to the surface... but it's just not quite there yet.

Old Browsers Are Holding Back The Web

When we use new DOM features, HTML5 APIs and the latest in CSS3, the possibilities that open up are astounding. These new technologies help us easily build Web applications with less reliance on hacks, plugins, images, and bloated scripts. This makes life easier not only for Web developers (for both building and maintaining these projects) but also for the end user who gets a faster and stronger overall experience.

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JavaScript Profiling With The Chrome Developer Tools

Your website works. Now let’s make it work faster. Website performance is about two things: how fast the page loads, and how fast the code on it runs. Plenty of services will make your website load faster, from minimizers to CDNs, but making it run faster is up to you.

JavaScript Profiling With The Chrome Developer Tools

Little changes in your code can have gigantic performance impacts. A few lines here or there could mean the difference between a blazingly fast website and the dreaded “Unresponsive Script” dialog. This article shows you a few ways to find those lines of code with Chrome Developer Tools.

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Help The Community! Report Browser Bugs!

You’re developing a new website and have decided to use some CSS3 and HTML5, now that many of the new specifications are gaining widespread support. As you’re coding the theme and thinking of how much easier these new technologies are making your job, you decide to stop for a while and test in other browsers, feeling a bit guilty for getting carried away and having forgotten to do so for a while. “Please work,” you whisper to your computer, while firing up all of the browsers you have installed. Browser A, check. You smile, feeling a bit relieved. Browser B, check. Your smile widens, and you start to feel better already. Browser C, “FFFFUUUUUUUUUUU…!”

Sound familiar? You might be surprised to hear that this is not necessarily your fault. With the competition in the browser market these days and the fast pace at which the new specifications are developing, browser makers are implementing new stuff in a hurry, sometimes without properly testing it. CSS3 and HTML5 are much more complex than their predecessors. The number of possible combinations of new features is huge, which leads to the most common cause of bugs: two (or more) things that weren’t tested together. As a result, developers these days stumble upon browser bugs much more frequently than they used to.

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Reliable Cross-Browser Testing, Part 1: Internet Explorer

In a perfect world, cross-browser testing would be straightforward. We would download a legacy version of a browser, run it, and be able to instantly test our pages and scripts without a single care in the world. The reality of cross-browser testing, though, is very different. Issues such as runtime conflicts when running multiple versions of the same browser and inaccurate third-party testing tools mean we can spend hours just evaluating whether a testing set-up is anywhere near reliable.

screenshot

I’m a user-interface developer at AOL (yes, we’re not dead yet!), and in this multi-part post I’ll take you through the exact set-up we use to accurately test content that will be potentially viewed by up to millions of users with a very diverse set of browsers. This set-up is similar to the one used by some of my colleagues at Opera, Mozilla and Google, so, fingers crossed, we’re doing this optimally.

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Using CSS3: Older Browsers And Common Considerations

With the arrival of IE9, Microsoft has signalled its intent to work more with standards-based technologies. With IE still the single most popular browser and in many ways the browser for the uninitiated, this is hopefully the long awaited start of us Web craftsmen embracing the idea of using CSS3 as freely as we do CSS 2.1.

Lost World’s Fairs

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However, with IE9 not being supported on versions of Windows before Vista and a lot of businesses still running XP and reluctant (or unable) to upgrade, it might take a while until a vast majority of our users will see the new technologies put to practice. While plenty of people out there are using CSS3, many aren’t so keen or don’t know where to start. This article will first look at the ideas behind CSS3, and then consider some good working practices for older browsers and some new common issues.

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Cross-Browser Testing: A Detailed Review Of Tools And Services

As you probably know, cross-browser testing is an important part of any developer's routine. As the number of browsers increase, and they certainly have in recent years, the need for automatic tools that can assist us in the process becomes ever greater. In this article, we present an overview of different cross-browser testing applications and services. Surely, you are already familiar with some of them, and you may have even stumbled across another overview article, but this one takes a different approach.

Screenshot

This is not just a list of available tools, but rather a comprehensive analysis based on my experience with each of them. For the impatient among you, a summary table is at the end summarizing key metrics and unique features for each service. But if you're interested in my personal experience with these tools, then read on.

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The Life, Times (and Death?) of Internet Explorer 6 (Comic Strip)

In recent years Internet Explorer 6 has become the browser web designers love to hate. Security issues, JavaScript errors and inexplicable CSS rendering quirks have made it the brunt of many jokes. With IE6 in its twilight and big companies like Google dropping support, it seems like a good time to take a fond look back at our old foe. In this post we're looking at what Internet Explorer 6 used to be and why its image changed over the years. You can also see the comic in a larger version.

Do we need to review our projects in Internet Explorer 6? Can we stop supporting IE6? If not, how do we handle those users who are still using IE6? And if yes, how can we prompt IE6 users to upgrade? Or how do we convince those who don't allow their employees to get rid of the legacy browser to upgrade? What do you think? We are looking forward to your opinions in the comments to this post!

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15 Helpful In-Browser Web Development Tools

There are many useful Web development tools that integrate in your browser. These in-browser tools are commonly known as add-ons or extensions. Though add-ons and extensions aren't just for Web development, many of them out there are designed specifically for Web developers. In-browser tools vary greatly in the jobs they perform; for example, some of them help you diagnose issues with CSS, HTML and JavaScript, while others evaluate the accessibility of your website.

Web Developer - screen shot.

In this article, we explore some of the most popular and useful in-browser Web development tools. You'll find tools for popular Web browsers like Firefox and Internet Explorer. Whether you need to debug and inspect your HTML, inspect HTTP headers, access FTP source files, evaluate accessibility or just figure out what color a Web page element is, you may find a variety of tools discussed here useful. [Content Care Nov/08/2016]

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