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Posts Tagged ‘Clients’.

We are pleased to present below all posts tagged with ‘Clients’.

10 Useful FTP Clients For Designers And Developers

FTP'ing is a fact of life for Web designers and developers. Some Web design programs have built-in FTP utilities, but they may not always quite meet your needs. Sometimes you just want to upload a file, image or something else that doesn't require any coding. Opening your usual coding application seems like a big waste of time in that case. The applications below range from basic clients with little more than upload and download capabilities to fully featured clients that include advanced file management features and the ability to work with Amazon S3 and WebDAV. There are solutions for everyone, both paid and free. Price seems to have little to do with functionality, though it does often make a difference in the amount of support available. These applications range from basic Web-based FTP applets to fully featured FTP clients that do everything you would want an FTP program to do. Almost all of them include support for SFTP and FTPS in addition to regular FTP. Some also include support for WebDAV and Amazon S3. Read more...

8 Strategies For Successful Relations With Clients

Let’s face it. Some days, you want to just fire your clients. You go through one too many comps, iterations or edits and you’ve had enough. It has happened to everyone at least once and I’d be lying if I said it won’t happen again; you get to the end of a project and realize that you would have made more per hour flipping burgers at McDonald’s.

contract

Thankfully, as with most common problems, there are a few simple guidelines that you can follow to help make sure that you’re never working for below minimum wage.

Remember that the client will always know more about their product or service than you do. They are the expert at what they do; their problem is usually that they don’t know how to explain it well. That is where you, as the designer, step in to help. You are a graphical communications ninja, but to effectively make your, and ultimately your client’s, point you must fully understand what needs to be said. [Content Care Oct/27/2016]

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How To Communicate Design Decisions To Clients?

You may have noticed that in certain business and marketing circles there exists a "backlash" against the design community. Despite the rise of attractive, user-friendly solutions, in such cirlces unattractive designs have somehow managed to remain at the verge of acceptance. You'll hear ideas being thrown around like "design is a waste of time — we have a really ugly site which outsells our competitors 3 to 1" or "we are not worried about the design, we'll outsource it or use a free Wordpress theme, let us focus more on the product". [Content Care Oct/17/2016]

Eye-Tracking

You can almost sense a little bit of pride in how ugly their web-site is, or that they are treating design like a commodity. However off base these types of thoughts might be, there is clearly a lack of respect for designers in the business community at times. I'd like to address how you can shatter this barrier and talk to business folk in a language they understand.

This article provides you with 5 guidelines you can use as a designer to "speak business" — even if it's just to get your foot in the door or land a big project.

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