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Smashing Conf Barcelona 2016

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Posts Tagged ‘CSS’.

We are pleased to present below all posts tagged with ‘CSS’.

Getting Started With CSS calc()

I first discovered the calc() function more than four years ago, thanks to CSS3 Click Chart, and I was absolutely delighted to see that basic mathematical computations — addition, subtraction, multiplication and division — had found their way into CSS.

Using CSS calc()

A lot of people think preprocessors fully cover the realm of logic and computation, but the calc() function can do something that no preprocessor can: mix any kind of units. Preprocessors can only mix units with a fixed relation between them, like angular units, time units, frequency units, resolution units and certain length units.

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Using System UI Fonts In Web Design: A Quick Practical Guide

For perhaps the first time since the original Macintosh, we can get excited about using system UI fonts. They’re an interesting, fresh alternative to web typography — and one that doesn’t require a web-font delivery service or font files stored on your server. How do we use system UI fonts on a website, and what are the caveats?

Using System UI Fonts On Your Website: The Practical Guide

System UI fonts being amazing kind of snuck up on us. Google has been toiling away at Roboto with great success (including regular updates), Apple made a splash with San Francisco, and Mozilla asked renowned type designer Erik Spiekermann to create Fira Sans.

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Flexbox For Interfaces All The Way: Tracks Case Study

The days of floats and margin trickery are finally behind us, as CSS furnishes developers with new and improved properties perfect for those delicate layouts. Layout features such as vertical alignment, evenly distributed spacing, source-order control and other patterns such as “sticky” footers are quite effortless to achieve with flexbox.

Tracks preview

In this article, we’ll discuss layout patterns well suited to flexbox, using the interface from the Tracks application, which also takes advantage of atomic design principles. I’ll share how flexbox proved useful and note the pitfalls of pairing it with particular layout patterns. We’ll look at those patterns that caused concern, provide suggestions for fallbacks and share additional tactics to start using this CSS property immediately.

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Mobile Navigation For Smashing Magazine: A Case Study

Since we started plodding around on this rock in space, human beings have always been dissatisfied with their environment — which is (mostly) a good thing. Otherwise we might still live in caves, fearful of the weather and worshipping the sun. It's dissatisfaction and curiosity which drive us to fix things that ain't broken.

Mobile Navigation For Smashing Magazine: A Case Study

Back in spring 2013, Smashing Magazine sported a <select> menu as its mobile navigation. It wasn't considered an anti-pattern back then and I still think it's a viable solution to the complex problem of how to build accessible and functional cross-device navigation. Brad Frost wrote a few words about the pros and cons of this pattern on his blog and I couldn't agree more.

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Laying Out A Flexible Future For Web Design With Flexbox

CSS floats and clears define web layout today. Based on principles derived from centuries of print design, they’ve worked well enough — even if, strictly speaking, floats weren’t meant for that purpose. Neither were tables, but that didn’t stop us in the 1990s.

A Flexible Future For Web Design With Flexbox

Nevertheless, the future of web layout is bright, thanks to flexbox. The CSS layout mechanism lets us arrange elements in a truly web-like way. Some elements can be fixed, while others scroll. The order in which they appear can be independent of the source order. And everything can fit a range of screen sizes, from widescreen TVs to smartphones — and even devices as yet unimagined. Browser support is fantastic (except you-know-who). Yep, it’s a great time to jump into flexbox if you haven't done so yet.

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Understanding Critical CSS

The web is slow, yet there are a few simple strategies to make websites faster. One of them is inlining critical CSS into the <head> of your pages, yet how exactly do you do it if your site contains hundreds of pages, or even worse, hundreds of different templates? You can't do it manually. Dean Hume explains an easy way to get it done. If you're a seasoned web developer, you might find the article obvious and self-explanatory, but it's a good piece to show to your clients and junior developers for sure. — Ed.

Understanding Critical CSS

Delivering a fast, smooth web experience is an important part of building websites today. Most of the time, we develop websites without understanding what the browser is actually doing under the hood. How exactly does the browser render our web pages from the HTML, CSS and JavaScript that we create? How can we use this knowledge to speed up the rendering of our web pages?

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Constructing CSS Quantity Queries On The Fly

Often within a project, the presentation of our content changes based on certain needs. We see this when we use media queries to change our styles based on the user device. CSS quantity queries follow the same concept of changing the styles based on a condition: the condition within a quantity query being the number of sibling elements.

QuantityQueries.com

An example would be navigation where items are 25% wide when four items are available; yet when there are five items available, the width of the navigation items changes to 20%. This is a common problem with dynamic site frameworks like WordPress or Ghost. A client might not realize the complications that could arise, for example, by adding one more menu item when the CSS is not set up to fit it in.

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Designing Flexible, Maintainable Pie Charts With CSS And SVG

When it comes to CSS techniques, nobody is more stubborn and smart enough to find solutions to any problems than Lea Verou. Recently, Lea has written, designed and published "CSS Secrets", a truly fantastic book on the little CSS tricks and techniques for solving everyday problems. If you thought that you know CSS fairly well, think again: you will be surprised. In this article, we publish a few nuggets from the book, which were also presented in Lea's recent talk at SmashingConf New York — on designing simple pie charts, with CSS. Please notice that some demos might not work as expected due to limited support in browsers. —Ed.

Designing Simple Pie Charts With CSS

Pie charts, even in their simplest two-color form, have traditionally been anything but simple to create with web technologies, despite being incredibly common for information ranging from simple stats to progress indicators and timers. Implementations usually involved either using an external image editor to create multiple images for multiple values of the pie chart, or large JavaScript frameworks designed for much more complex charts.

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Quantity Ordering With CSS

Here is your mission, should you choose to accept it: create a table of items. Each item should span a third of the content area, with the fourth item starting on a new row, much like floats. However, a particular item must always display the price at the end of the first row.

Quantity Ordering With CSS

So if there are only two elements, the price element would be second. But if there are more than three items, the price would be the last element in the first row. You might assume that JavaScript would be the best solution — just loop over the items, and if there are more than three, update the styling. But what if I told you could do it with CSS alone?

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