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Posts Tagged ‘Data Visualization’.

We are pleased to present below all posts tagged with ‘Data Visualization’.

Things To Keep In Mind When Designing A Transportation Map

For many people, a map of a transportation network is a given, an expected part of the system, something that just is — like a fire-escape plan in a building. So, when I say that I design transportation maps, they don't understand. What is there to design even?

Things To Keep In Mind When Designing A Transportation Map

Well, let's take the London underground map as an example. Designed by Harry Beck, it was the world's first transportation map to use the principles of electrical circuit drawings. All line segments were put to the angles of 45 or 90 degrees. The distances between stations were equalized.

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Understanding Stacked Bar Charts: The Worst Or The Best?

Data visualization has become an important part of our everyday life, allowing us to quickly assess information. And with so many chart types out there to choose from, it should be possible to effectively solve almost any task, whether it's exploratory (i.e. researching and analyzing data to better understand it for yourself) or explanatory (i.e. reporting and communicating data to end users).

Understanding Stacked Bar Charts: The Worst Or The Best?

However, variety can also cause confusion, making it difficult to clearly understand the purpose of each form of data visualization. As a result, when an inappropriate type of chart is applied to data, the user not only might be confused by the information, but, more importantly, could make bad decisions based on such a presentation.

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Finding Better Mobile Analytics

When creating a mobile application, a developer imagines a model and the way users will use the application. One problem that developers face is that users do not always use an app the way it was envisaged by the developer.

Finding Better Mobile Analytics

How do users interact with the app? What do they do in the app? Do they do what the developer wants them to do? Mobile analytics help to answer these questions. Analytics allow the developer to understand what happens with the app in real life and provide an opportunity to adjust and improve the app after seeing how users actually use it. To put it simply, analytics is the study of user behavior.

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Diving Into Procedural Content Generation, With WorldEngine

When I was young and learning to program, I was fascinated by the possibility of creating things that could live inside my monitor. I had the same feeling when I started to play with procedural content generation, which is to find the rules behind a phenomenon, encode them in an algorithm, and use that algorithm to create something virtual, but realistic — a plausible simulation.

Procedural Content Generation

Typically, you can give a seed or some initial parameters to a procedural content generation algorithm, and get some result. You could generate the landscape of a city, the shape of a tree or an entire world.

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Fun With Physics In Data Visualization

Data visualization is on the rise. Publishers around the world — individual bloggers and major online publications alike — are realizing that charts, maps and combinations of the two can convey a message far more effectively than plain numbers can.

Fun With Physics In Data Visualization

From simple charts to fancy infographics to complex timeline animations, data visualizations are popping up all over the Internet. However, as in any other area, once everyone gets on the train, distinguishing yourself from the pack becomes hard.

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Chartist.js, An Open-Source Library For Responsive Charts

The list of charting libraries for the web is already quite long, and you might ask yourself why we would need to make it any longer. Whenever you need to develop an application’s dashboard, embed some usage statistics or simply visualize some data, you will find yourself looking for a charting library that fits your needs.

Chartist.js, An Open Source Library For Responsive Charts

Chartist was developed for a very particular need: to create simple responsive charts. While other charting libraries do a great job of visualizing data, something is always missing to satisfy this simple yet demanding need.

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CSS-Only Solution For UI Tracking

The web is growing up. We are building applications that work entirely in the browser. They are responsive; they have tons of features and work under many devices. We enjoy providing high-quality code that is well structured and tested.

CSS-Only Solution For UI Tracking

But what matters in the end is the impact for clients. Are they getting more products sold or are there more visitors for their campaign sites? The final results usually show if our project is successful. And we rely on statistics as a measuring tool. We all use instruments like Google Analytics. It is a powerful way to collect data. In this article, we will see a CSS-only approach for tracking UI interactions using Google Analytics.

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Is Your Responsive Design Working? Google Analytics Will Tell You

Responsive web design has become the dominant method of developing and designing websites. It makes it easier to think “mobile first” and to create a website that is viewable on mobile devices. In the early days of responsive web design, creating breakpoints in CSS for particular screen sizes was common, like 320 pixels for iPhone and 768 pixels for iPad, and then we tested and monitored those devices.

Is Your Responsive Design Working? Google Analytics Will Tell You

As responsive design has evolved, we now more often start with the content and then set breakpoints when the content “breaks.” This means that you might end up with quite a few content-centric breakpoints and no particular devices or form factors on which to test your website.

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A Common Misconception About Designing With Data

Too often when working in information design, you’ll hear the request, “Can you make the data look cool?” “Cool” is a rather ambiguous term, and means different things to different people.

All That Glitters Is Not Gold: A Common Misconception About Designing With Data

Unfortunately, when working with data, the term “cool” is often directly juxtaposed with common charts like line, bar and pie, which are often relegated to the backbench, and written off as “boring.”

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The Do’s And Don’ts Of Infographic Design: Revisited

Editor's Note: Last Friday, we published an article on the Do's And Don’ts Of Infographic Design written by Amy Balliett which raised quite a discussion within the design community. Some readers agreed, some readers found examples contradictory, and some readers felt that there were some problems with the article which should be addressed in a further article. Nathan Yau was kind enough to write a counter piece arguing about the practices and examples presented within the original article. This article is his response to Amy's article published a week ago. Please notice that the main point of this article is to show a different perspective at the points mentioned in the original article; it isn't supposed to be a “corrected" guide to infographic design.

Smashing Magazine offered advice on the “Dos And Don’ts Of Infographic Design“, but they forgot to include the former. It’s as if I wrote a fake post and someone mistook it for a serious guide. Written by Amy Balliett, it seems to me that the post is basically about a couple of tips on how to create linkbait that doesn’t work. Or at least I hope it doesn’t. Many of the dos are actually dont’s, and judging by some of the comments that the article had received, it’s worth pointing out what’s what.

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The Do’s And Don’ts Of Infographic Design

Since the dawn of the Internet, the demand for good design has continued to skyrocket. From Web 1.0 to Web 2.0 and beyond, designers have remained on their toes as they define the trends and expectations of our online universe. The Internet is a great designer’s playground, and online businesses are growing more and more appreciative of what can be gained from a bit of well-executed eye candy.

Over the past two years, this fact has become the backbone of a growing trend in online marketing: the infographic. Infographics are visual representations of information, or “data viz” as the cool kids call it these days. The term “data viz” comes from “data visualization,” which implies that sets of data will be displayed in a unique way that can be seen, rather than read. This visualization should not be left up to interpretation, it should instead be designed in a way that provides a universal conclusion for all viewers.

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How To Create An Animated HTML Graph With CSS And jQuery

People in boardrooms across the world love a good graph. They go nuts for PowerPoint, bullet points and phrases like “run it up the flagpole,” “blue-sky thinking” and “low-hanging fruit,” and everything is always “moving forward.” Backwards is not an option for people who facilitate paradigm shifts in the zeitgeist. Graphs of financial projections, quarterly sales figures and market saturation are a middle-manager’s dream.

How can we as Web designers get in on all of this hot graph action? There are actually quite a few ways to display graphs on the Web. We could simply create an image and nail it to a Web page. But that’s not very accessible or interesting. We could use Flash, which is quite good for displaying graphs — but again, not very accessible. Besides, designers, developers and deities are falling out of love with Flash.

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