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Today, too many websites are still inaccessible. In our new book Inclusive Design Patterns, we explore how to craft flexible front-end design patterns and make future-proof and accessible interfaces without extra effort. Hardcover, 312 pages. Get the book now →

Posts Tagged ‘Design Patterns’.

We are pleased to present below all posts tagged with ‘Design Patterns’.

How To Build Honest UIs And Help Users Make Better Decisions

Many apps today, such as Google Now, Spotify and Amazon, make assumptions about user preferences based on personal data. They may even use this information to make decisions on our behalf, without any direct input from us. For example, Facebook tailors your news feed and Amazon recommends products  —  both hiding "irrelevant" information and only showing what they think you will like.

How To Build Honest UIs And Help Users Make Better Decisions

This type of design pattern, where user choice is removed, has recently been coined "anticipatory design". Its aim is to leverage data on user behavior to automate the decision-making process in user interfaces. The outcome lowers the excessive number of decisions people currently make, thereby reducing decision fatigue and improving decisions overall.

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Meet “Inclusive Front-End Design Patterns”, A New Smashing Book

We might not realize it, but as developers, we build inaccessible websites all the time. It's not for the lack of care or talent though — it's a matter of doing things the wrong way. In our new book, Inclusive Design Patterns, Heydon Pickering explains how we can craft accessible interfaces without extra effort — and what front-end design patterns we can use to create inclusive experiences. Quality hardcover, 312 pages. Get the book now!

Accessibility Matters: Our New Book, 'Inclusive Design Patterns' Is Now Shipping!

Now, accessibility has always been a slightly unsettling realm for web developers. Surrounded with myths, misunderstandings, and contradicting best practices, it used to be a domain for a small group of experts who would "add" accessibility on top of the finished product. Today, in many simple and complex websites, it's still unclear what makes up an accessible interface and what developers need to know in order to achieve it.

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Smart Responsive Design Patterns, Or When Off-Canvas Isn’t Good Enough

Design patterns often have a bad reputation. They are often considered to be quick, lazy, off-the-shelf solutions that are applied blindly without consideration of the context of a problem. Solutions such as the almighty off-canvas navigation, the floating label pattern or carousels for featured products are some of the prominent ones.

Smart Responsive Design Patterns, Or When Off-Canvas Isn't Good Enough

This article isn’t about these patterns, though. This article features some of the slightly more obscure design patterns, such as responsive car-builder interfaces, mega dropdown navigation, content grids, maps and charts, as well as responsive art direction. Please note that this article isn’t technical; it explores interesting UX patterns out in the wild, rather than code samples. Beware: You will not be able to unsee what you are about to see, and that’s probably a good thing.

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Quick Tips On Design Systems: Sell The Output, Not The Workflow

So how do you sell a design system to the client? How do you establish a shared commitment within the company to put a pattern library on the roadmap? As designers and developers, we often know and see the benefits of an overarching system that radiates consistency throughout the different experiences of a company. But sometimes it's seen as a very unpredictable investment, and the value isn't necessarily visible right away.

You can illustrate how fractured an organization is by printing out its different presences online and putting them on a large board. Credit: Dan Mall

In his article on Selling Design Systems, Dan Mall suggests to illustrate how fractured an organization is by printing out its different presences online and putting them on a large board as an example of all the wasted money and effort that goes into making sites from scratch, one-by-one, needlessly reinventing the wheel every time.

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Is The Internet Killing Creativity?

The internet is a wonderful place (mostly). An unprecedented revolution in communication, it continues to empower more people to publish and share their knowledge than any other phenomenon in history. It is a limitless playground of ideas and unbridled creativity. Or is it?

Is The Internet Killing Creativity?

In 2014, Elliot Jay Stocks declared that designers have stopped dreaming. That we’ve stopped being creative. That every site looks the same. A crazy notion, considering the magnitude of tools and resources we have at our disposal. But Elliot’s been right before, and he’s not alone either.

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Continuous Input In Mobile Devices: Pain Or Gain?

Working with text has long been the domain of desktops and notebooks. Yet the screen size, resolution and software of mobile devices have improved in recent years, which has made typing a fairly large amount of text quite achievable.

Continuous Input In Mobile Devices: Pain Or Gain?

A number of apps and techniques are intended to make this task easier, thus increasing productivity and increasing the amount of text that can be comfortably created or edited on a mobile device.

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Fun With Physics In Data Visualization

Data visualization is on the rise. Publishers around the world — individual bloggers and major online publications alike — are realizing that charts, maps and combinations of the two can convey a message far more effectively than plain numbers can.

Fun With Physics In Data Visualization

From simple charts to fancy infographics to complex timeline animations, data visualizations are popping up all over the Internet. However, as in any other area, once everyone gets on the train, distinguishing yourself from the pack becomes hard.

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Mobile Design Pattern: Inventory-Based Discrete Slider

Sliders are cool. When they’re done well, customers love to interact with them. When they're not done well, they can cause a lot of frustration (not to mention lost sales) by standing between your customers and what they want. And getting them wrong is surprisingly easy.

Mobile Design Pattern: Inventory-Based Discrete Slider

In this article, we will present a solution, including the design and code, for a new type of Android slider to address common problems, along with a downloadable Android mini-app for you to try out. It’s a deep dive into sliders based on a chapter in Android Design Patterns. The experimental inventory-based slider we will look at would be at home in any application that asks for a price, a size, or any other faceted input within a widely distributed range.

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