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Posts Tagged ‘iOS’.

We are pleased to present below all posts tagged with ‘iOS’.

App Development Showdown: Why You Should Care About Revisiting The Native Vs. Hybrid Debate In 2017

Back in 2007, the world met the iPhone for the very first time. After Apple’s product debut, it took less than six months for work to begin on PhoneGap, which would become one of the first and most adopted frameworks for hybrid mobile app development — that is, for apps written simultaneously for multiple platforms using HTML, CSS and JavaScript, rather than coded in native languages.

App Development Showdown: Why You Should Care About Revisiting The Native Vs. Hybrid Debate In 2016

When compared with the prospect of learning an entirely new language and development environment in order to program iOS (and soon Android) apps, the appeal of this type of development to the already huge population of web developers in the world was palpable.

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How To Build A SpriteKit Game In Swift 3 (Part 3)

Have you ever wondered what it takes to create a SpriteKit game? Do buttons seem like a bigger task than they should be? Ever wonder how to persist settings in a game? Game-making has never been easier on iOS since the introduction of SpriteKit. In part three of this three-part series, we will finish up our RainCat game and complete our introduction to SpriteKit.

How To Build A SpriteKit Game In Swift 3 (Part 3)

If you missed out on the previous lesson, you can catch up by getting the code on GitHub. Remember that this tutorial requires Xcode 8 and Swift 3.

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How To Build A SpriteKit Game In Swift 3 (Part 2)

Have you ever wondered what it takes to create a SpriteKit game? Does collision detection seem like a daunting task? Do you want to know how to properly handle sound effects and background music? Game-making has never been easier on iOS since the introduction of SpriteKit. In part two of this three-part series, we will explore the basics of SpriteKit.

Hot To Build A SpriteKit Game In Swift 3 (Part 2)

If you missed out on the previous lesson, you can catch up by getting the code on GitHub. Remember that this tutorial requires Xcode 8 and Swift 3.

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How To Build A SpriteKit Game In Swift 3 (Part 1)

Have you ever wondered what it takes to create a SpriteKit game from beginning to beta? Does developing a physics-based game seem daunting? Game-making has never been easier on iOS since the introduction of SpriteKit.

How To Build A SpriteKit Game In Swift 3 (Part 1)

In this three-part series, we will explore the basics of SpriteKit. We will touch on SKPhysics, collisions, texture management, interactions, sound effects, music, buttons and SKScenes. What might seem difficult is actually pretty easy to grasp. Stick with us while we make RainCat.

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The Thumb Zone: Designing For Mobile Users

If there is one thing that will stand the test of time, it's thumb placement on mobile devices. This makes consideration of the "thumb zone", a term coined in Steven Hoober's research, an important factor in the design and development of mobile interfaces.

The Thumb Zone: Designing For Mobile Users

Have you ever interacted with a mobile website or app that simply didn't play nice with your thumbs? Perhaps you've had to stretch to get to an important menu, or swiping turned into a battle with multiple swiping elements. Mishaps such as these reveal poor consideration of the thumb zone.

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Diverse Test-Automation Frameworks For React Native Apps

The bar is set high for today’s mobile apps. First, apps must meet the standard of quality that app markets expect. Secondly, mobile app users are very demanding. Plenty of alternatives are available to download, so users will not tolerate a buggy app.

Diverse Test-Automation Options For React Native Apps

Because mobile apps have become such a crucial part of people’s lives, users won’t be shy about sharing their love or hate for an app — and that feedback gets in front of millions of users in seconds.

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Cross-Platform Native Apps With A Single Code Set Using Telerik NativeScript

Mobile applications are now a critical part of most enterprises, and there are many ways to create them, but what are the differences between these options and how do you choose between them? Do you choose to create native applications as Google and Apple intend? Do you choose to develop a mobile web hybrid application? Or do you find a middle ground?

Cross-Platform Native Apps With A Single Code Set Using Telerik NativeScript

We’re going to look at some of the common problems with developing mobile applications, both native and hybrid, and how NativeScript by Telerik fills the gap. We’ll proceed to develop a NativeScript Android and iOS application from scratch (using the supplied source code), and then convert the same application to use the bleeding-edge Angular 2 JavaScript framework.

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The Making Of Melody Jams

After months of hard work, I’ve finally gotten my side project, Melody Jams, into the App Store. It’s been quite the adventure, and I’m thrilled to see it in the store. Seeing it live makes me reflect on the process that got us there: our failures and successes, some of the crazy stuff we figured out and what our hopes and dreams are.

The Making Of Melody Jams

To give you some context, I worked with five other people completely remotely. Most of us still haven’t met in real life. In spite of that, we designed, programmed, animated and submitted the app in four months. It works on iPhone 4s through iPhone 6s+ and iPad 2 through iPad Pro. We also tested it with over 30 kids, ranging from nine months to nine years old, in that timeframe.

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A Better Architecture For iOS Apps: A Deep Look At The Model-View-Controller Pattern

If you’ve ever written an iOS app beyond a trivial "Hello world" app with just one screen and a few views, then you might have noticed that a lot of code seems to "naturally" go into view controllers.

A Better Architecture For iOS Apps: A Deep Look At The Model-View-Controller Pattern

Because view controllers in iOS carry many responsibilities and are closely related to the app screens, a lot of code ends up being written in them because it’s just easier and faster that way.

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