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Posts Tagged ‘JavaScript’.

We are pleased to present below all posts tagged with ‘JavaScript’.

Beyond The Browser: From Web Apps To Desktop Apps

I started out as a web developer, and that's now one part of what I do as a full-stack developer, but never had I imagined I'd create things for the desktop. I love the web. I love how altruistic our community is, how it embraces open-source, testing and pushing the envelope.

Beyond The Browser: From Web Apps To Desktop Apps

I love discovering beautiful websites and powerful apps. When I was first tasked with creating a desktop app, I was apprehensive and intimidated. It seemed like it would be difficult, or at least… different.

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How To Develop An Interactive Command Line Application Using Node.js

Over the last five years, Node.js has helped to bring uniformity to software development. You can do anything in Node.js, whether it be front-end development, server-side scripting, cross-platform desktop applications, cross-platform mobile applications, Internet of Things, you name it. Writing command line tools has also become easier than ever before because of Node.js — not just any command line tools, but tools that are interactive, useful and less time-consuming to develop.

How To Develop An Interactive Command Line Application Using Node.js

If you are a front-end developer, then you must have heard of or worked on Gulp, Angular CLI, Cordova, Yeoman and others. Have you ever wondered how they work?

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When Your Code Has To Work: Complying With Legal Mandates

Douglas Crockford famously declared browsers to be "the most hostile software engineering environment imaginable," and that wasn't hyperbole. Ensuring that our websites work across a myriad of different devices, screen sizes and browsers our users depend on to access the web is a tall order, but it's necessary.

When Your Code Has To Work: Complying With Legal Mandates

If our websites don't enable users to accomplish the key tasks they come to do, we've failed them. We should do everything in our power to ensure our websites function under even the harshest of scenarios, but at the same, we can't expect our users to have the exact same experience in every browser, on every device.

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A Detailed Introduction To Webpack

JavaScript module bundling has been around for a while. RequireJS had its first commits in 2009, then Browserify made its debut, and since then several other bundlers have spawned across the Internet.

A Detailed Introduction To Webpack

Among that group, webpack has jumped out as one of the best. If you’re not familiar with it, I hope this article will get you started with this powerful tool.

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Experimenting With speechSynthesis

I’ve been thinking a lot about speech for the last few years. In fact, it’s been a major focus in several of my talks of late, including my well-received Smashing Conference talk “Designing the Conversation.” As such, I’ve been keenly interested in the development of the Web Speech API.

Experimenting With speechSynthesis

If you’re unfamiliar, this API gives you (the developer) the ability to voice-enable your website in two directions: listening to your users via the SpeechRecognition interface and talking back to them via the SpeechSynthesis interface. All of this is done via a JavaScript API, making it easy to test for support. This testability makes it an excellent candidate for progressive enhancement, but more on that in a moment.

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HTML APIs: What They Are And How To Design A Good One

As JavaScript developers, we often forget that not everyone has the same knowledge as us. It’s called the curse of knowledge: When we’re an expert on something, we cannot remember how confused we felt as newbies. We overestimate what people will find easy.

HTML APIs: What They Are And How To Design A Good One

Therefore, we think that requiring a bunch of JavaScript to initialize or configure the libraries we write is OK. Meanwhile, some of our users struggle to use them, frantically copying and pasting examples from the documentation, tweaking them at random until they work.

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Styled-Components: Enforcing Best Practices In Component-Based Systems

Building user interfaces on the web is hard, because the web and, thus, CSS were inherently made for documents. Some smart developers invented methodologies and conventions such as BEM, ITCSS, SMACSS and many more, which make building user interfaces easier and more maintainable by working with components.

Styled-Components: Enforcing Best Practices In Component-Based Systems

After this shift in mindset towards building component-based user interfaces, we are now in what we like to call the "component age." The rise of JavaScript frameworks such as React, Ember and recently Angular 2, the effort of the W3C to standardize a web-native component system, pattern libraries and style guides being considered the "right way" to build web applications, and many other things have illuminated this revolution.

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Sponsored Article How My API-Driven Website Helps Me Travel The World

Recently, I decided to rebuild my personal website, because it was six years old and looked — politely speaking — a little bit "outdated." The goal was to include some information about myself, a blog area, a list of my recent side projects, and upcoming events.

How My API-Driven Website Helps Me Travel The World

As I do client work from time to time, there was one thing I didn't want to deal with — databases! Previously, I built WordPress sites for everyone who wanted me to. The programming part was usually fun for me, but the releases, moving of databases to different environments, and actual publishing, were always annoying.

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Progressive Web AMPs

If you’ve been following the web development community these last few months, chances are you’ve read about progressive web apps (PWAs). It’s an umbrella term used to describe web experiences advanced that they compete with ever-so-rich and immersive native apps: full offline support, installability, “Retina,” full-bleed imagery, sign-in support for personalization, fast, smooth in-app browsing, push notifications and a great UI.

From Google’s Advanced Mobile Pages (AMP) to progressive web apps

But even though the new Service Worker API allows you to cache away all of your website’s assets for an almost instant subsequent load, like when meeting someone new, the first impression is what counts. If the first load takes more than 3 seconds, the latest DoubleClick study shows that more than 53% of all users will drop off.

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