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Posts Tagged ‘JavaScript’.

We are pleased to present below all posts tagged with ‘JavaScript’.

The Issue With Global Node Packages

Node.js brought about a great revolution for JavaScript developers by allowing us to write code that runs directly on our machines; our skills were no longer limited to browsers alone. At first, many of us simply saw this as a way to write our application servers without needing to learn another language, but we all quickly caught on to the fact that we could also write tools for the command line that automate a lot of things in our development cycles.

The Issue With Global Node Packages

npm, which is bundled with Node.js, made this even easier by giving us quick and easy access to tools that others have created, which we install on our machines to access from wherever we are in our system. JavaScript was finally a “real” programming language. But with these new capabilities came a lot of best practices that needed to be discovered, because there were many new scenarios that wouldn’t be found in the browser. In particular, I’d like to discuss a practice that has been on my mind a lot lately that I think much of the community needs to evaluate.

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Write Your Next Web App With Ember CLI

When you start a fresh web project or start digging into an existing code base, chances are you’re trying to create or enhance a feature for your users. The last thing you want to do is spend time customizing build tools and creating infrastructure to develop your application. If you land a new client, you want to show them features today, not in a week after you’ve cobbled together a build pipeline.

Write Your Next Web App With Ember CLI

As you might already know, Ember is an “opinionated” JavaScript web framework focused on building ambitious, rich client web applications. Technologically, Ember has positioned itself as theantidote to hype fatigue. It’s a framework that just won’t die, but keeps pressing on with each innovation and with a commitment to backwards-compatibility.

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Generating SVG With React

React is one of today’s most popular ways to create a component-based UI. It helps to organize an application into small, human-digestible chunks. With its “re-render the whole world” approach, you can avoid any complex internal interactions between small components, while your application continues to be blazingly fast due to the DOM-diffing that React does under the hood (i.e. updating only the parts of the DOM that need to be updated).

Generating SVG With React

But can we apply the same techniques to web graphics — SVG in particular? Yes! I don’t know about you, but for me SVG code becomes messy pretty fast. Trying to grasp what’s wrong with a graph or visualization just by looking at SVG generator templates (or the SVG source itself) is often overwhelming, and attempts to maintain internal structure or separation of concerns are often complex and tedious.

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Reimagining Single-Page Applications With Progressive Enhancement

What is the difference between a web page and a web application? Though we tend to identify documents with reading and applications with interaction, most web-based applications are of the blended variety: Users can consume information and perform tasks in the same place. Regardless, the way we approach building web applications usually dispenses with some of the simple virtues of the readable web.

Reimagining Single-Page Applications

Single-page applications tend to take the form of runtimes, JavaScript executables deployed like popup shops into vacant <body> elements. They’re temporary, makeshift and not cURL-able: Their content is not really there without a script being executed. They’re also brittle and underperforming because, in service of architectural uniformity and convenience, they make all of their navigation, data handling and even the basic display of content the responsibility of one thing: client-side JavaScript.

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Making Accessibility Simpler, With Ally.js

I’ve been a web developer for 15 years, but I’d never looked into accessibility. I didn’t know enough people with (serious) disabilities to properly understand the need for accessible applications and no customer has ever required me to know what ARIA is. But I got involved with accessibility anyway – and that’s the story I’d like to share with you today.

Making Accessibility Simpler

At the Fronteers Conference in October 2014 I saw Heydon Pickering give a talk called “Getting nowhere with CSS best practices”. Among other things, he made a case for using WAI-ARIA attributes like aria-disabled="true" instead of classes like .is-disabled to express application state. It struck me then and there that I was missing out on a few well-prepared standards, simply because ARIA belongs to that accessibility space that I had no idea of.

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Lessons Learned In Big App Development, A Hawaiian Airlines Case Study

Having spent over two years making it, we just pressed the “Ship” button on the new Hawaiian Airlines website. It has been the biggest project of my career, and I’ve worked with the most talented team I’ve ever worked with.

Lessons Learned In Big App Development

Everything was rebuilt from the ground up: hardware, features, back-end APIs, front end, and UX and design. It was a rollercoaster ride like no other, but we have prevailed and built what I believe to be one of the best airline-booking experiences on the web. Yes, humble, I know!

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Sailing With Sails.js: An MVC-style Framework For Node.js

I had been doing server-side programming with Symfony 2 and PHP for at least three years before I started to see some productivity problems with it. Don’t get me wrong, I like Symfony quite a lot: It’s a mature, elegant and professional framework. But I’ve realized that too much of my precious time is spent not on the business logic of the application itself, but on supporting the architecture of the framework.

Sailing With Sails.js

I don’t think I’ll surprise anyone by saying that we live in a fast-paced world. The whole startup movement is a constant reminder to us that, in order to achieve success, we need to be able to test our ideas as quickly as possible. The faster we can iterate on our ideas, the faster we can reach customers with our solutions, and the better our chances of getting a product-market fit before our competitors do or before we exceed our limited budget. And in order to do so, we need instruments suitable to this type of work.

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Using The Gamepad API In Web Games

The Gamepad API is a relatively new piece of technology that allows us to access the state of connected gamepads using JavaScript, which is great news for HTML5 game developers.

Using The Gamepad API In Web Games

A lot of game genres, such as racing and platform fighting games, rely on a gamepad rather than a keyboard and mouse for the best experience. This means these games can now be played on the web with the same gamepads that are used for consoles. A demo is available, and if you don’t have a gamepad, you can still enjoy the demo using a keyboard.

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AngularJS’ Internals In Depth, Part 2

In the previous article in this series, I discussed scope events and the behavior of the digest cycle. This time around, I’ll talk about directives. This article will cover isolate scopes, transclusion, linking functions, compilers, directive controllers and more.

AngularJS' Internals In Depth, Part 2

If the figure looks unreasonably mind-bending, then this article might be for you. This article is based on the AngularJS v1.3.0 tree.

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