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Posts Tagged ‘Navigation’.

We are pleased to present below all posts tagged with ‘Navigation’.

Efficiently Simplifying Navigation, Part 3: Interaction Design

Having addressed the information architecture and the various systems of navigation in the first two articles of this series, the last step is to efficiently simplify the navigation experience — specifically, by carefully designing interaction with the navigation menu.

Efficiently Simplifying Navigation, Part 3: Interaction Design

When designing interaction with any type of navigation menu, we have to consider symbols, target areas, interaction event, layout, levels, functional context. It is possible to design these aspects in different ways. Designers often experiment with new techniques to create a more exciting navigation experience. And looking for new, more engaging solutions is a very good thing.

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Efficiently Simplifying Navigation, Part 2: Navigation Systems

How do we make navigation as simple and predictable as possible? As explained in part 1 of this series, the first two steps are to structure content in a way that naturally narrows the navigation options, and to explain those options in a way that minimizes the cognitive load on users.

Efficiently Simplifying Navigation, Part 2: Navigation Systems

However, two more steps are required — namely, to choose the right type of navigation menu, and then to design it. The second part of this series addresses the third step and discusses which type of navigation menu is best suited to which content.

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Efficiently Simplifying Navigation, Part 1: Information Architecture

Navigation, as crucial as it is to the user experience, is merely a means to an end — the end being to consume content. This is why users have very contrasting expectations about content and navigation. While content is supposed to be unique, surprising and exciting, navigating to it is supposed to be as simple and predictable as possible.

Efficiently Simplifying Navigation, Part 1: Information Architecture

This series of articles, divided into two parts, is a four-step guide to efficiently simplifying the navigation experience, by analyzing the type and amount of content as well as choosing and carefully designing the right type of navigation menu.

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An E-Commerce Study: Guidelines For Better Navigation And Categories

Product findability is key to any e-commerce business — after all, if customers can’t find a product, they can’t buy it. Therefore, at Baymard Institute, we invested eight months conducting a large-scale usability research study on the product-finding experience. We set out to explore how users navigate, find and select products on e-commerce websites, using the home page and category navigation.

An E-Commerce Study: Guidelines For Better Navigation And Categories

The one-on-one usability testing was conducted following the “think aloud” protocol, and we tested the following websites: Amazon, Best Buy, Blue Nile, Chemist Direct, Drugstore.com, eBags, GILT, GoOutdoors, H&M, IKEA, Macy’s, Newegg, Pixmania, Pottery Barn, REI, Tesco, Toys’R’Us, The Entertainer, and Zappos. The pages and design elements that we tested include the home page, category navigation, subcategories, and product lists.

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Responsive Navigation On Complex Websites

Central to a solid user experience is a well-structured, simple navigation system. Over the past few months, I’ve been involved in launching two large institutional websites with complex navigation systems.

Responsive Navigation On Complex Websites

Maintaining simplicity on such large websites becomes increasingly difficult as content requirements grow and tiers of navigation are added, not to mention the extra complexity added by small screens.

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Original And Innovative Web Layouts

The layout is the foundation of your website. It guides the user through the sections and tells them what is most important. It also sets the aesthetic of the website. Therefore, you need to carefully think through how you lay out content.

Original And Innovative Web Layouts

An original, creative layout goes a long way to improving the user experience of a website, although not letting your creativity get in the way of usability is important. As usual, we have to put ourselves in the users' shoes: What do we want them to see first? How will your message be best communicated? We have to ask these questions before we start designing, because the layout will shape the rest of the design.

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Creative And Innovative Navigation Designs

A website has a personality — it is a reflection of the person or organization behind it. When people visit your website, you want it to stand out from the crowd, to be memorable. You want people to come back and use your website or get in touch with you.

Creative And Innovative Navigation Designs

So, to distinguish itself from the unwashed masses, your website not only needs remarkable content, but also has to be innovative yet functional. Ask yourself, what would make life easier for your user? The following websites will whet your appetite for extreme creativity. Browse through and explore them for yourself.

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How Much Has The Web Really Changed?

Responsive design is about more than just layout; it’s about designing for the Web, which means, mostly, for people with browsers. And that’s just about everything we know about the people who visit our websites: they are probably using a browser. All the rest we just don’t know.

How Much Has The Web Really Changed?

Up until not so long ago, we used to base our designs on some rather general assumptions about screen size and input type. With the rise of devices with various screen sizes and alternative ways to interact, these assumptions have turned out to be unreliable. We need to upgrade the defaults that we use when we start designing our websites.

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Infinite Scroll: Let’s Get To The Bottom Of This

Infinite scroll promised to provide users with a better experience. However, the good is often accompanied by the bad and the ugly. Once we understand the strengths and weaknesses of infinite scrolling, we can begin to use it to empower our interfaces. [Links checked February/21/2017]

Infinite Scrolling: Let's Get To The Bottom Of This

Human nature's framed perception demands an hierarchic interface; an interface that would make it easy for users to find their way around. Infinite scroll, sometimes leaves users feeling disoriented as they travel down the page that never ends.

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Release Responsive Nav: A Simple JavaScript Plugin For Responsive Navigation

There are several ways to make navigation responsive, and usually the solution we need is quite straightforward. But despite the apparent simplicity, there are many underlying factors which, when thought through and implemented properly, can make a simple solution even better without adding more complexity to the user interface.

Responsive Nav: A Simple JavaScript Plugin For Responsive Navigation

One of the problems I’ve encountered while building responsive navigations is that browsers currently don’t support CSS3 transitions to a height which is defined auto. Most of the time, we shouldn’t use fixed height either because the height of menu items might not be the same in all browsers, and the number of items may change. I also always try to reduce the weight of pages I build, so I’ve been wanting a solution that doesn’t require a big library such as jQuery to work.

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Navigation For Mega-Sites

For most websites, navigation is not particularly challenging. A primary navigation bar, supported by sub-navigation, is often enough. Typically, sub-navigation displays the parent, siblings and children of the current page.

Navigation For Mega-Sites

A persistent primary navigation bar shows top-level pages, allowing users to move between sections. However, there is one class of website for which this traditional form of navigation falls short. It is what I refer to as a "mega-site".

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C-Swipe: An Ergonomic Solution To Navigation Fragmentation On Android

There are 3,997 different Android devices. Your navigation should work with all of them. C-Swipe can help: It is an alternative navigation pattern for tablets and mobile devices that is novel, ergonomic and localized.

Navigation Fragmentation On Android

This article provides a detailed walk-through of the design and code and provides a downloadable mini-app so that you can try out C-Swipe to see whether it’s right for your app.

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