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Posts Tagged ‘Opinion Column’.

We are pleased to present below all posts tagged with ‘Opinion Column’.

Career Advice For Graduating Web Design Students

It’s that time of year again: graduation, when students transition away from the classroom to what will hopefully be a long and successful career in their chosen industry. I recently said goodbye to some of my own website design and development students. Instead of teaching lessons in design principles or responsive websites, I spent our final evening together answering their questions. One of those questions was, “What is the best career advice you’ve ever received?

Career Advice For Graduating Web Design Students

At the time, I didn’t have an answer. I could think of many instances when someone helped me solve a particularly complex design challenge or a complex CSS issue or helped me navigate a delicate client situation, but I wouldn’t consider those “best career advice” moments. After thinking about it for a week or so, I came up with four pieces of advice that I received early in my career and that were invaluable to me as I was getting started in this industry but that are just as relevant and useful to me today.

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Fostering Healthy Non-Professional Relationships

As Web designers and developers, we invest a lot of time and effort in nurturing professional relationships, including those with clients, prospective clients, coworkers, peers and others in the industry.

Fostering Healthy Non-Professional Relationships

Unfortunately, while many Web professionals work hard to make these work-related relationships as strong as possible, they often neglect their non-professional relationships, including those with family and friends and even with themselves and their own health and well-being.

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Taking A Second Look At Free Fonts

Once thought of as amateurish by professional designers, free and open-source fonts have gone through something of a renaissance in just the last few years. The quality of available free fonts has increased dramatically. To be frank, free fonts don't have a good reputation, and often they are knock-offs of thoroughly crafted, already established typefaces. So is it time for professional designers to take a second look?

Taking A Second Look At Free Fonts

Early in my design career, around 2003, I wanted to purchase the font DIN for a project at work. My manager promptly dismissed the idea of paying for a font and instead handed me a CD that had “5,000 free fonts” on it, saying “This CD has every font a designer could possibly need. No need to waste money buying fonts!”

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Applying Transformations To Responsive Web Design

To most Web developers, it sounds controversial until you hear the punchline: Last summer, the developers in charge of Google’s Chrome browser floated a proposal that went virtually unnoticed by the technology press, which was to remove support for an established W3C standard that every other browser vendor still supports.

Applying XSL Transformations For Responsive Web Design

The standard in question? Extensible Stylesheet Language Transformations, otherwise known as XSLT. In reaction to this news, most Web developers would likely shrug and say “So what?” That’s unfortunate. Transformations are a simple yet powerful technique for separating content and presentation in Web applications.

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Dealing With Workaholism On Web Teams

Workaholism is often confused with hard work. Some people who work on the Web seem not only to disregard its dangers, but to actively promote it. They see it as a badge of honor—but is it really? On the contrary, it’s a serious issue that can damage Web teams.

Dealing With Workaholism On Web Teams

Before we get started, let’s make one thing clear: A "workaholic" is someone who is addicted to work, someone who is out of balance and out of control. Their addiction can make them work for 12, 14 or even more hours a day, every day. No weekends, no vacations, just work. Soon, they neglect their family, friends, health, sometimes damaging them all irrevocably.

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The Challenges And Rewards Of Teaching Web Design

Just over four years ago, I decided to take a part-time position teaching website design and front-end development at a local university, the University of Rhode Island. My time in the classroom has been one of the most challenging as well as one of the most rewarding experiences in my career, and I believe that other Web professionals would greatly benefit from spending some time in an educational setting teaching others their craft.

The Challenges And Rewards Of Teaching Web Design

In this article, we will look at some of the challenges to prepare for if you are considering taking on a teaching position. I will also present some of my personal experiences and insights, including the benefits and rewards I’ve enjoyed as a teacher, to help you consider such a move for your own career.

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Laying The Groundwork For Extensibility

The Web has succeeded at interoperability and scale in a way that no other technology has before or since. Still, the Web remains far from “state of the art”, and it is being increasingly threatened by walled gardens. The Web platform often lags competitors in delivering new system and device capabilities to developers.

Laying The Groundwork For Extensibility

Worse, it often hobbles new capabilities behind either high- or low-level APIs, forcing painful choices (and workarounds) on developers. Despite browser versions being released much faster, new capabilities still take a long time to materialize, and often do so in forms that are at best frustrating and at worst nearly useless to large swathes of the developer community for solving real-world needs.

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Recent Trends In Storytelling And New Business Models For Publishers

It is clear that the ongoing dramatic transformation of the media industry in all its formats (audio, video and text) leaves the door open for a complete reinvention of the publishing business. This transition has opened up opportunities for experimentation, and many players are trying to define the future of media in general, and journalism in particular.

Recent Trends In Storytelling And New Business Models For Publishers

In this article, we will discuss several recent such experiments, with special focus on new forms of storytelling, as well as new business models for publishers — a fascinating recent trend called “subcompact publishing” will be our main reference.

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Best Of Both Worlds: Mixing HTML5 And Native Code

Much has been written recently in the ongoing debate between native and HTML5 applications. There are three principal ways to develop a mobile solution: native code, hybrid mobile app, mobile Web app. Developing an application in HTML5 is a way to leverage code across multiple platforms, rather than having to write the entire application from scratch for each platform.

Best Of Both Worlds: Mixing HTML5 And Native Code

As such, much of the user interface, perhaps the entire interface, would be done in HTML. “Hybrid application” is a term often given to applications that are developed largely in HTML5 for the user interface and that rely on native code to access device-specific features that are not readily available to Web applications.

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Progressive Enhancement Is Faster

The aim of republishing the original article by Jake is to raise awareness and support the discussion about the role of progressive enhancement within the community. We look forward to your opinions and thoughts in the comments section. – Ed.

Progressive enhancement has become a bit of a hot topic recently, most recently with Tom Dale conclusively showing it to be a futile act, but only by misrepresenting what progressive enhancement is and what its benefits are.

Progressive Enhancement Is Faster

You shouldn't cater to those who have deliberately disabled JavaScript, unless of course you have a particular use case there, e.g. you're likely to get significant numbers of users with the Tor Browser, which comes with JS disabled by default for security. If you do have that use case, progressive enhancement helps, but that's not its main benefit.

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