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Posts Tagged ‘Readability’.

We are pleased to present below all posts tagged with ‘Readability’.

Size Matters: Balancing Line Length And Font Size In Responsive Web Design

As we refine our methods of responsive web design, we’ve increasingly focused on measure (another word for “line length”) and its relationship to how people read.

Size Matters: Balancing Line Length And Font Size In Responsive Web Design


The popularization of the “ideal measure” has led to advice such as “Increase font size for large screens and reduce font size for small screens.” While a good measure does improve the reading experience, it’s only one rule for good typography. Another rule is to maintain a comfortable font size.

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Using White Space For Readability In HTML And CSS

Right up front, I’ll offer some simple advice: In production, your code should be as performance-friendly as possible. This means, Gzip’ing, concatenating and minifying as many assets as possible, thus serving the smallest possible files and the least number of files.

Using White Space For Readability In HTML And CSS

I don’t think anyone would argue that these suggestions aren’t best practices (even if we don’t implement them in every project). Now that we’ve got that out of the way, how can we use white space in development code to ensure that our files are as readable and maintainable as possible?

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Designing For The Reading Experience

With the rise of web fonts as well as affordable hosted web font services and ready-made kits, typography is reclaiming its title as design queen, ruler of all graphic and web design. At the same time, for far too many designers, the main concern about typography today seems to be aesthetic in nature. [Links checked March/06/2017]

Designing For The Reading Experience

The problem is, we tend to use typography and lettering as two interchangeable terms, which they are not. The allure of well-executed lettering — and, boy, I could spend hours just looking at lettering portfolios! — can affect the way we view typefaces, because both typography and lettering share common visual concepts.

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How To Apply Macrotypography For A More Readable Web Page

Any application of typography can be divided into two arenas: micro and macro. Understanding the difference between the two is especially useful when crafting a reading experience, because it allows the designer to know when to focus on legibility and when to focus on readability.

Applying Macrotypography For A More Readable Web Page

This article focuses mostly on a few simple macrotypographic techniques—with a dash of micro—and on how to combine them all to build a more harmonious, adaptable and, most importantly, readable Web page. First, some definitions. Microtypography has to do with the details; setting the right glyph, getting the appropriate kerning and tracking, and making stylistic choices such as when to use small-caps.

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Designing Engaging And Enjoyable Long-Form Reading Experiences

Finally some good news from the media industry: digital subscriptions are growing. We see positive reports from newspapers like The New York Times and magazine publishers like Conde Nast: announcements about increases in their digital content sales and paywall members.

Designing Engaging And Enjoyable Long-Form Reading Experiences

When you have fantastic and original content, ensuring your readers have the best possible experience is critical to building and keeping your audience. The following suggested practices can help you design your content to create a better experience for your readers.

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16 Pixels Font Size: For Body Copy. Anything Less Is A Costly Mistake

I know what you're thinking. “Did he just say 16 pixels? For body copy? Obnoxiously big! 12 pixels is ideal for most websites.” I’d like to persuade you otherwise. In this article, I’ll explain why 16 pixels should generally be the minimum size for body copy in modern Web design. If I don’t change your mind, perhaps you could chip in at the end and let me know why.

You see, in most cases, if you’re building websites with the font size set between 10 and 15 pixels, you are costing your clients money. And I aim to prove it. If you’re building a website for someone — even yourself — chances are its purpose is to make money. Perhaps it’s to sell a product directly, or to offer a service, or just to generate leads. Whatever the case, it’s a business asset, and ultimately it has to generate a return on investment. It has to fulfill a revenue goal.

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10 Principles Of Readability And Web Typography

Readability is one of the more important aspects of Web design usability. Readable text affects how users process the information in the content. Poor readability scares readers away from the content. On the other hand, done correctly, readability allows users to efficiently read and take in the information in the text. You want users to be able to read your content and absorb it easily. [Content Care Dec/03/2016]

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In this post, we'll explain some Web typography terms and how they play into readability; we'll present numerous tips to help improve the readability of your content; and we'll showcase very readable websites, layouts and articles.

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