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Posts Tagged ‘Responsive Web Design’.

We are pleased to present below all posts tagged with ‘Responsive Web Design’.

Responsive Web Design With Physical Units

This post should be titled “Getting Ahead of Yourself.” “…By a Few Years,” actually. Here’s the deal: at the time I’m writing this, early 2013, there’s no way to accurately design for the Web using physical units, nor will there be for a very long time. But there is a way to design while knowing the physical characteristics of the device — or, at least, there will be in the very near future.

Mobile devices

It’s called the “resolution media query”, and it’s been in the specification for media queries for some time. However, while it has been in the spec, that doesn’t mean anyone has actually implemented it yet. Fortunately, WebKit is leading the way and pushing for this feature to be implemented. So, how will we use this nifty little feature, exactly? Here’s how.

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Optimization Responsively Retrofitting An Existing Site With RWD Retrofit

Since the introduction of the iPhone in 2007, touchscreen mobile devices have exploded in popularity. They have introduced new problems, new solutions, new interactions, new ways of thinking and, of course, new costs to our clients.

Responsively Retrofitting An Existing Site With RWD Retrofit

The most important question on everyone’s mind — clients and developers alike — is, “How can we provide a great Web experience to our users on mobile?”

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Responsible Considerations For Responsive Web Design

Responsive Web design has been evolving rapidly ever since Ethan Marcotte coined the term two years ago. Since then, techniques have emerged, become best practices and formed part of our ever-changing methodology.

Readability app

A few obvious examples are the multitude of responsive image techniques, conditional loading, and responsive design and server-side components (RESS), among many other existing and emerging strands stemming from the core concept of responsive Web design.

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RWD & Device Detection? Building A Better Responsive Website

Earlier this year, I was in the beginning stages of a redesign for our company’s website. We had already been planning to use a straightforward responsive approach to Web design, which is our preferred solution for multi-device support.

Building A Better Responsive Website

After hearing some frank discussions at An Event Apart conference in Boston about the limitations and challenges of responsive Web design, I realized that our solution needed a bit of adjustment.

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Logical Breakpoints For Your Responsive Design

There are several tactics for deciding where to put breakpoints in a responsive design. There is the rusty idea that they should be based on common screen sizes, but this doesn’t scale well. There are no “common” screen sizes. Another popular tactic is to create a breakpoint wherever the layout breaks.

Logical Breakpoints For Your Responsive Design

This sounds much better. But it still leaves us with the question, How do you determine whether the layout is broken? One logical answer is to look at classic readability theory and to define our breakpoints based on that.

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Opinion Column Why Responsive Web Design Has To Win Out

When considering a mobile Web strategy and weighing responsive Web design against a separate mobile website, the most important metric is how functional the website is for the user. This goes beyond better content organization for smaller screens.

Responsive Web Design: Planning for the Future

Mobile (and desktop) websites should be easily found, easily shared, fast loading, easy to maintain and easy to build on. If we keep that in mind, considering where the Web is today and where it looks to be going, there are many compelling arguments for responsive Web design.

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Designing In The Transition To A Multi-Device World

When I think about where we are with the Web in comparison to other media in history, pinpointing it is really hard. Is it like when the Gutenberg Press was just invented and we’re experimenting with movable type, or are we still embellishing pages and slavishly copying books by hand?

Designing In The Transition To A Multi-Device World

Our knowledge of building digital things changes rapidly, taking us from newborn to adult and back again every couple of years. It’s both exciting and frustrating, because just when you think you have it all figured out, it completely changes. But if you’re like me, learning something new keeps things interesting.

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Think Again: Assumptions About Mobile To Reconsider

The popularity of mobile has skyrocketed over the past few years. We've seen six generations of iPhones, five iPad models, hundreds of Android phones and thousands of different devices being manufactured.

Assumptions About Mobile To Reconsider

Design and development have gone all the way from static and desktop-centric to responsive and device-aware. And it has been a very exciting journey. The field is relatively young — we are all learning (usually by mistakes). Because of that, we are also struggling with generalizations and even stereotypes.

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How To Implement Off-Canvas Navigation For A Responsive Website

The varying viewports that our websites encounter on a daily basis continue to demand more from responsive design. Not only must we continue to tackle the issues of content choreography — the art of maintaining order and context throughout the chaotic ebb and flow of the Web browser — but we must also meet the expectations of users. [Links checked February/21/2017]

Implementing Off-Canvas Navigation For A Responsive Website

They’re not sitting still. With the likes of Firefox OS (Boot to Gecko), Chrome OS and now Ubuntu for phones — an OS that makes “Web apps” first-class citizens — delivering native app-like experiences on the Web may become a necessity if users begin to expect it.

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