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Posts Tagged ‘Strategy’.

We are pleased to present below all posts tagged with ‘Strategy’.

It’s Here. Meet “User Experience Revolution”, A New Smashing Book (Print + eBook)

Many companies will say they care about the user experience. They even know it is important. And yet, every day we are surrounded by companies treating customers with utter disrespect, both offline and on. They sell their data and waste their time. They leverage dark patterns and demonstrate complete indifference.

The UX Revolution Hardcover

This is why we are releasing a new book today called “User Experience Revolution,” a practical battle plan for placing the user at the heart of your company. Companies desperately need to change, and the book shows you how to help them do that. Get the book now.

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How We Started Releasing Features Twice As Fast (Case Study)

When businesses rely on your app for their day-to-day work, you have to be agile enough to quickly address their needs. If you don’t, others definitely will. In the unforgiving world of SaaS, delaying a critical feature (or rushing a bug-ridden piece of code) will mean losing clients. A solid agile workflow can make all the difference.

How We Started Releasing Features Twice As Fast: A Case Study

We’re the team behind Active Collab, a project-management app with an ever-growing set of features and a sizeable user base. This means that even the smallest change in functionality will affect a large number of people. Therefore, the development process needs to run smoothly and up to a standard, with delays reduced to a bare minimum.

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How To Roll Out New Features Without Hurting Loyal Users

“Be agile; release early; release often.” We know the drill. But is it strategically wise to keep rolling out features often? Especially once a product you’re building reaches a certain size, you probably don’t want to risk the integrity of your application with every new minor release.

The UI Stack

The worst thing that can happen to your product is that loyal users, customers who have been using that one little feature consistently over the years, suddenly aren’t able to use it in the same convenient way. The change might empower users more, but the experience becomes less straightforward.

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Transforming Lufthansa’s Brand Strategy: A Case Study

The first time I became aware of brand inconsistency was four, maybe five years ago. Companies were extending their appearances to apps, social media and other digital channels. And so did the bank I worked for back then. Unfortunately, no style guides were available to cover these channels.

Transforming Lufthansa’s Brand Implementation Strategy: From The Online To Interactive Age, A Case Study

I remember the dilemma while writing specifications: there were some older corporate identity manuals and some static UI style guides. Then, you’d look at newer web projects and none of them reflected the guidelines. So, what was I to do? Strictly obey the guidelines and produce something that looks outdated, or adapt to modern channels and risking a user experience that diverged from existing customer touch points?

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Lessons Learned After Shutting My Startup, Following A Six-Year Struggle

On 12 January 2015, Getwear, an integrated custom jeans company, processed its last order. After that, the company shut down. Despite coming up with a unique custom production process and outstanding jeans, we didn’t achieve much success. Several months — and a lot of discussion and dissection — later, I figured out why.

Lessons Learned After Shutting My Startup, Following A Six-Year Struggle

It all started back in 2009, when I was finishing my marketing studies in Italy. I read a well-known article by Tim O’Reilly, “What Is Web 2.0,” and was stunned by an idea of bringing the concept to the world of “real” objects, through mass customization. Enabling users to make their own products should have transferred the power to make design decisions from the hands of the few to the hands of the people — or so I thought.

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Introducing RAIL: A User-Centric Model For Performance

There’s no shortage of performance advice, is there? The elephant in the room is the fact that it’s challenging to interpret: Everything comes with caveats and disclaimers, and sometimes one piece of advice can seem to actively contradict another. Phrases like “The DOM is slow” or “Always use CSS animations” make for great headlines, but the truth is often far more nuanced.

RAIL Performance Model

Take something like loading time, the most common performance topic by far. The problem with loading time is that some people measure Speed Index, others go after first paint, and still others use body.onload, DOMContentLoaded or perhaps some other event. It’s rarely consistent. When it comes to other ways to measure performance, you’ve probably seen enough JavaScript benchmarks to last a lifetime. You may have also heard that 60 FPS matters. But when? All the time? Seems unrealistic.

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Why We Shouldn’t Make Separate Mobile Websites

There has been a long-running war going on over the mobile Web: it can be summarized with the following question: "Is there a mobile Web?" That is, is the mobile device so fundamentally different that you should make different websites for it, or is there only one Web that we access using a variety of different devices? Acclaimed usability pundit Jakob Nielsen thinks that you should make separate mobile websites. I disagree.

Why We Shouldn't Make Separate Mobile Websites

Jakob Nielsen, the usability expert, recently published his latest mobile usability guidelines. He summarizes, "Good mobile user experience requires a different design than what's needed to satisfy desktop users. Two designs, two sites, and cross-linking to make it all work."

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Responsive Web Design Techniques, Tools and Design Strategies

Back in January, we published an article on responsive design, “Responsive Web Design: What It Is and How to Use It.” Responsive design continues to get a lot of attention, but considering how different it is from the “traditional” way of designing websites, it can be a bit overwhelming for those designers who have yet to try it.

To that end, we've compiled this roundup of resources for creating responsive website designs. Included are tutorials, techniques, articles, tools and more, all geared toward giving you the specific knowledge you need to create your own responsive designs.

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Picking A Mobile Support Strategy For Your Website

The number of people browsing the Web from a mobile device has more than tripled since 2009, and it is sure to continue growing, with browser platforms such as iOS and Android offering mobile browser support that is almost identical to what we have come to expect from a desktop experience. As the mobile consumer market continues to grow, so will the aspirations of individuals and companies who look to embrace what the mobile Web has to offer.

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With this in mind, many website owners have begun to develop a strategy for providing information and services to their mobile visitors. However, mobile strategies can vary massively from website to website, depending on what the company wants to offer visitors. For example, eBay’s strategy will be very different from an individual’s strategy for a portfolio website, which might simply be to improve readability for those viewing on a mobile device.

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A User-Centered Approach To Web Design For Mobile Devices

For the past few years, we've heard pundits declaring each year as "year of the mobile Web"; each year trying to sound more convincing than the previous. Whether 2011 will be the real "year of the mobile" remains to be seen, but what is indisputable is the fact that the mobile usage of the Web is growing and evolving. As it evolves, so does the mobile user experience, driven by advances in mobile device technology — from better browsers on basic mobile phones (or feature phones — remember the Motorola RAZR?) to the increased adoption of smartphones and tablets.

From designer's screens to smaller mobile screens

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The term "Mobile Web" (although often criticized) is commonly used to describe accessing the internet using a mobile device. This definition is broad enough to cover everything from using a browser on a feature phone, to using highly customized apps on smartphones or tablets.

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How To Build A Mobile Website

Over the past few years, mobile web usage has considerably increased to the point that web developers and designers can no longer afford to ignore it. In wealthy countries, the shift is being fueled by faster mobile broadband connections and cheaper data service. However, a large increase has also been seen in developing nations where people have skipped over buying PCs and gone straight to mobile.

CNN Standard Site vs. Mobile

Unfortunately, the mobile arena introduces a layer of complexity that can be difficult for developers to accommodate. Mobile development is more than cross-browser, it should be cross-platform. The vast number of mobile devices makes thorough testing a practical impossibility, leaving developers nostalgic for the days when they only had to support legacy browsers.

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Web Design Checkmate: Using Chess For Success in Web Design

The business of building websites is one of constant change, adaptation and strategy. The way designers and developers build websites is often informed by the methods of others and their own trial and error. In light of this, we can draw a number of parallels — some philosophical, to a certain extent — between Web professionals and one of the oldest and most popular board games of all time (counting traditional and digital games). This game is chess.

Screenshot

In this article, we’ll explore the relationship between the game of chess and the Web industry. We’ll learn fundamental lessons from the pawn, rook, knight, bishop, queen and king, and we’ll highlight the factors — both offline and online — that determine best practices. The game is beloved by many professionals, so it seems fitting to apply its great strategy and elegance to the digital age; certain practices might help you lead a more successful working life.

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