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Posts Tagged ‘SVG’.

We are pleased to present below all posts tagged with ‘SVG’.

Generating SVG With React

React is one of today’s most popular ways to create a component-based UI. It helps to organize an application into small, human-digestible chunks. With its “re-render the whole world” approach, you can avoid any complex internal interactions between small components, while your application continues to be blazingly fast due to the DOM-diffing that React does under the hood (i.e. updating only the parts of the DOM that need to be updated).

Generating SVG With React

But can we apply the same techniques to web graphics — SVG in particular? Yes! I don’t know about you, but for me SVG code becomes messy pretty fast. Trying to grasp what’s wrong with a graph or visualization just by looking at SVG generator templates (or the SVG source itself) is often overwhelming, and attempts to maintain internal structure or separation of concerns are often complex and tedious.

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Animating Clipped Elements In SVG

Scalable Vector Graphics (or SVG) lend developers an incredible ability to display crisp, beautiful graphics at any size or resolution. SVG can also be animated using various techniques. In combination with clipping paths, interesting effects can be achieved.

Animating Clipped Elements In SVG

This article explains the difference between an SVG clipPath and a CSS clip-path, including examples to guide and inform you through this journey. Finally, I’ll share a few demos both personal and in the wild to help you better understand clipPath animation and inspire your visions.

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Creating Cel Animations With SVG

What if I told you there was an image format like GIF, but it worked with vectors? What if I said it was possible to reverse the direction of its animation? What if you could take one base image and animate different parts of it separately, at different speeds? Well, the image format, SVG, already exists. It just needs a little gentle encouragement.

Creating Cel Animations With SVG

In this article, I’ll be mixing old with new, taking a somewhat primitive art and breathing new life into it. With the help of Sass, I’ll be streamlining the necessary workflow and hopefully demonstrating that automation can, sometimes, be a friend to creativity.

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A Guide To Building SVG Maps From Natural Earth Data

Interactive maps are a fantastic way to present geographic data to your visitors. Libraries like Google Maps and Open Street Maps are a popular choice to do this and they excel at visualizing street-level data. However, for small-scale maps, SVG maps are often a better option. They are lightweight, fully customizable and are not encumbered by any licensing restrictions.

A Guide To Making SVG Maps From Natural Earth Data

It's possible to find a number of SVG maps released under permissible licenses in the Wikimedia Commons. Unfortunately, it's likely that you will eventually find these options lacking. The map you need may not exist, may be out of date (as borders change), or may not be well-formatted for web use. This article will explain how to create your own SVG maps using Natural Earth data and open source tools. You will then be able to create SVG maps of any area of the world, using any projection, at any resolution. As an illustration, we will create an SVG world map.

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Designing Flexible, Maintainable Pie Charts With CSS And SVG

When it comes to CSS techniques, nobody is more stubborn and smart enough to find solutions to any problems than Lea Verou. Recently, Lea has written, designed and published "CSS Secrets", a truly fantastic book on the little CSS tricks and techniques for solving everyday problems. If you thought that you know CSS fairly well, think again: you will be surprised. In this article, we publish a few nuggets from the book, which were also presented in Lea's recent talk at SmashingConf New York — on designing simple pie charts, with CSS. Please notice that some demos might not work as expected due to limited support in browsers. —Ed.

Designing Simple Pie Charts With CSS

Pie charts, even in their simplest two-color form, have traditionally been anything but simple to create with web technologies, despite being incredibly common for information ranging from simple stats to progress indicators and timers. Implementations usually involved either using an external image editor to create multiple images for multiple values of the pie chart, or large JavaScript frameworks designed for much more complex charts.

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The Art Of The SVG Filter And Why It Is Awesome

After almost 20 years of evolution, today's web typography, with its high-density displays and support for OpenType features, is just a step away from the typographic quality of the offline world. But there's still one field of graphic design where we still constantly fall back to bitmap replacements instead of using native text: display typography, the art of staging letters in illustrative, gorgeous, dramatic, playful, experimental or unexpected ways.

The Art Of The SVG Filter And Why It Is Awesome

Sure, we're able choose from thousands of web fonts and use CSS effects for type, some with wide browser support (like drop-shadows and 3D transforms) and others that are more experimental (like background-clip and text-stroke), but that's basically it. If we want really outstanding display typography on our websites, we'll usually embed it as an image.

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A Few Different Ways To Use SVG Sprites In Animation

There are some things we know and like about SVGs. First, SVGs have smooth, clean edges on any display, so using SVGs can reduce the number of HTTP requests for image replacement. Second, it’s easy to make an SVG scalable to its container for responsive development.

A Few Different Ways To Use SVG Sprites In Animation

In this article we’ll cover a few ways of using SVG sprites to describe motion on the web. I’ll show some techniques for using SVG sprites in complex animation that takes advantage of these factors. All examples shown will assume the use of an auto-prefixer and some basic knowledge of CSS animations.

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Chartist.js, An Open-Source Library For Responsive Charts

The list of charting libraries for the web is already quite long, and you might ask yourself why we would need to make it any longer. Whenever you need to develop an application’s dashboard, embed some usage statistics or simply visualize some data, you will find yourself looking for a charting library that fits your needs.

Chartist.js, An Open Source Library For Responsive Charts

Chartist was developed for a very particular need: to create simple responsive charts. While other charting libraries do a great job of visualizing data, something is always missing to satisfy this simple yet demanding need.

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Styling And Animating SVGs With CSS

CSS can be used to style and animate scalable vector graphics, much like it is used to style and animate HTML elements. In this article, which is a modified transcript of a talk I recently gave at CSSconf EU and From the Front, I’ll go over the prerequisites and techniques for working with CSS in SVG.

Styling And Animating SVGs With CSS

I’ll also go over how to export and optimize SVGs, techniques for embedding them and how each one affects the styles and animations applied, and then we’ll actually style and animate with CSS.

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Ready For Retina HD: Create Pixel-Perfect Assets For Multiple Scale Factors

The 6 Plus is the first iPhone that sports a “Retina HD” display — the sharpest display Apple has ever made. It forces designers to provide an additional set of image resources to developers to match that sharpness.

Ready For Retina HD: Create Pixel-Perfect Assets For Multiple Scale Factors

We needed only one set of assets for the original iPhone up to iPhone 3GS. And when iPhone 4 came out with the Retina display, we also needed 2x assets — images twice as detailed. Now, with the display of the 6 Plus being even more detailed than that of the iPhone 4, we will also need to provide 3x assets. The numbers 1x, 2x and 3x are also called “scale factors.”

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