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Posts Tagged ‘Tables’.

We are pleased to present below all posts tagged with ‘Tables’.

Absolute Horizontal And Vertical Centering In CSS

In this article, Stephen Shaw introduces a technique for perfect horizontal and vertical centering in CSS, at any width or height. The techniques works with percentage-based width/height, min-/max- width, images, position: fixed and even variable content heights. — Ed.

We've all seen margin: 0 auto; for horizontal centering, but margin: auto; has refused to work for vertical centering... until now! But actually (spoiler alert!) absolute centering only requires a declared (variable) height and these styles.

.Absolute-Center {
  margin: auto;
  position: absolute;
  top: 0; left: 0; bottom: 0; right: 0;
}

I'm not the pioneer of this method (yet I have dared to name it Absolute Centering), and it may even be a common technique, however, most vertical centering articles never mention it and I had never seen it until I dug through the comments section of a particular article.

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Table Layouts vs. Div Layouts: From Hell to… Hell?

Over the last several years, developers have moved from table-based website structures to div-based structures. Hey, that’s great. But wait! Do developers know the reasons for moving to div-based structures, and do they know how to? Often it seems that people are moving away from table hell only to wind up in div hell.

Photo of a road sign containing heaven and hell

This article covers common problems with layout structure. The first part goes through what table and div hells are, including lots of examples. The next section shows how to write cleaner and more readable code. The final part looks at what features await in future. Please join us on this journey from hell to heaven.

You're in table hell when your website uses tables for design purposes. Tables generally increase the complexity of documents and make them more difficult to maintain. Also, they reduce a website’s flexibility in accommodating different media and design elements, and they limit a website's functionality.

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Pricing Tables: Examples And Best Practices

Pricing tables play an important role for every company that offers products or services. They are a challenge from both a design and usability standpoint. They must be simple but at the same time clearly differentiate between features and prices of different products and services.

ConceptShare Price Table

A pricing table should help users pick the most appropriate plan for them. A company should carefully examine its product portfolio and pick the most important features to present in its pricing plans. Visitors should be given only the information they would be interested in: available features, options and costs. The rule of thumb is: every unnecessary cell in your pricing table increases the probability of losing potential customers, because you make it more difficult for them to compare various plans and select the best one.

Once you have identified the most important features, go ahead and create a more detailed list of features for users who are interested in a particular plan. Users must know what kind of a product they are spending their money on and all of the features associated with it.

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Top 10 CSS Table Designs

Tables have got to be one of the most difficult objects to style in the Web, thanks to the cryptic markup, the amount of detail we have to take care of, and lack of browser compatibility. A lot of time could be wasted on a single table although it's just a simple one. This is where this article comes in handy. It will show you ten most easily implemented CSS table designs so you can style your tables in a zap!

Top 10 CSS Table Designs

Before we start, let's review the general rules of thumb when styling tables:

Tables love space. Set the width of tables carefully, according to the content. If you don't know the perfect width, simply set the width of the table to 100%. Tables look nicer when they have "overwidth", and when it comes to tables too much width is definitely better than too little width.

Cells need some padding. Sure, each table cell relates to each other. But it doesn't mean that we have to pull them too close, right? Define some space between the cells, crammed up table cells are so much harder to read.

Treat tables the way you treat content. Tables are read similarly to the way we read text — except it's harder and it takes more time to read a table. So be careful with the amount of contrast you are giving to your table. Use soft colors — it's easier for the eyes. Don't treat your table like it's a graphical decoration. Make sure that the style you apply to it makes the content more readable, not the other way around.

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