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Posts Tagged ‘Tools’.

We are pleased to present below all posts tagged with ‘Tools’.

A Deep Dive Into Axure 8: A Comprehensive Review

Behind every great invention lie dozens of sacrificed prototypes. It took Michele Ferrero almost five years to perfect the spherical wafer within the famous chocolates that bear his name. No great product or invention emerges fully formed, and this applies to great websites and software as well. Whether you're working on digital products or chocolates, prototyping plays an important role in any successful project.

A Deep Dive Into Axure 8: A Comprehensive Review

If you work in user experience or software development, chances are you will have encountered Axure RP at some point. Launched in 2003, Axure has gained a loyal following within the UX community. It allows for the creation of rich, functional prototypes without writing a single line of code.

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The Right Tool For The Job: Picking The Best Prototyping Software For Your Project

Prototyping tools have become an important resource for us designers — allowing us to document multiple states of a single screen, including animations, transitions and microinteractions that are hard to represent in static documentation.

The Right Tool For The Job: Picking The Best Prototyping Software For Your Project

Companies that pay attention to this trend have started to build prototyping tools to address this need; and today we're seeing a plethora of tools emerge on a regular basis. But which should you pick? More importantly, what questions should you ask yourself and your team to make sure you choose the right one?

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An Introduction To Redux

Redux is one of the hottest libraries in front-end development these days. However, many people are confused about what it is and what its benefits are. As the documentation states, Redux is a predictable state container for JavaScript apps. To rephrase that, it's an application data-flow architecture, rather than a traditional library or a framework like Underscore.js and AngularJS.

An Introduction To Redux

Redux was created by Dan Abramov around June 2015. It was inspired by Facebook’s Flux and functional programming language Elm. Redux got popular very quickly because of its simplicity, small size (only 2 KB) and great documentation. If you want to learn how Redux works internally and dive deep into the library, consider checking out Dan’s free course.

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Stylelint: The Style Sheet Linter We’ve Always Wanted

Everyone wants a clean, consistent code base, no matter the language. Developers are accustomed to setting up linters in programming languages such as JavaScript and Python, but they rarely use a linter for style sheets. In this article, we’ll look at stylelint, a linter for style sheets.

Stylelint: The Style Sheet Linter We've Always Wanted

We will also learn why linting a style sheet matters, how stylelint brings order to a style sheet and how we can avoid errors. Finally, we will learn how to use stylelint and start linting as soon as possible. Let's start with why linting is important.

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Quick Tips Tools And Resources For Editing, Converting And Optimizing SVGs

The power of SVGs lies in their flexibility to adapt to any size while remaining crisp and sharp. This makes them perfect for responsive web design and, since users can zoom in without sacrificing quality, meaningful from an accessibility-centered point of view.

Optimized and not optimized SVGs of the Twitter logo

To help you make best use of this potential and tackle SVGs the right way, this article will provide you with tools and resources to simplify editing, converting, optimizing, and delivering SVGs. We’ll take a look at what you can do to make your SVG code lean and performant, dive deeper into dealing with browser bugs, and provide tips for designing an icon system.

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Why You Should Stop Installing Your WebDev Environment Locally

Have you heard of Docker but thought that it’s only for system administrators and other Linux geeks? Or have you looked into it and felt a bit intimidated by the jargon? Or are you silently suffering with a messy development environment that seems to break all of the time in various mysterious ways? Then read on. By the end of this article, you should have a basic understanding of Docker and have it working on your computer!

Why You Should Stop Installing Your WebDev Environment Locally

The first part of this article gives a bit of background to help you understand the concepts behind Docker through some metaphors. But if you just want to get started with the tutorial, skip to the “Time to Play!” section.

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Quick Tips Automatically Art-Directed Responsive Images? Here You Go.

In many projects, responsive images aren’t a technical issue but a strategic concern. Delivering different images to different screens is technically possible with srcset and sizes and <picture> element and Picturefill (or a similar) polyfill; but all of those variants of images have to be created, adjusted and baked into the logic of the existing CMS. And that's not easy.

Smartcrop.js

On top of that, responsive images markup has to be generated and added into HTML as well, and if a new image variant comes into play at some point (e.g. a file format like WebP or a large landscape/portrait variant), the markup has to be updated. The amount of extra work required often causes trouble — so if you have a perfect product shot, you need to either manually create variants for mobile and portrait and landscape and larger views, or build plugins and extensions to somehow automate the process.

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Quick Tips Design Mock-Ups Need Dynamic Content: Tools And Plugins

Nothing is perfect on the web. We can't make sure that our websites always work as intended, but we can try our best to design resilient and flexible websites that aren't that easy to break — both in terms of interface design and security. Yet neither resilience nor flexibility are usually reflected in our deliverables and mock-ups.

In practice, mock-ups usually represent a perfect experience in a perfect context with perfect data which doesn't really exist. A good example for it are “optimal" usernames which are perfectly short, fit on a single line on mobile and wrap nicely, or perfect photography that allows for perfectly legible text overlays. It's not realistic. We need to work with dynamic content in our prototypes, with both average and extremes being represented.

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Revisiting Firefox’s DevTools

If you do any kind of development for the web, then you know how important tools are, and you like finding tools that make your life easier. Developing and testing new browser features, however, takes time. Between the time a useful tool first appears in an experimental nightly build and the time it’s available for everyone to use in Firefox, a while has passed.

Revisiting Firefox’s DevTools

That’s one of the reasons Mozilla released Firefox Developer Edition in November 2014 as the recommended Firefox browser for developers. It gets new feature updates more quickly so that you can use the latest tools.

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