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Posts Tagged ‘User Interaction’.

We are pleased to present below all posts tagged with ‘User Interaction’.

Improve User Experience With Real-Time Features

Real-time technology delivers information to your users as it happens. But how does it help improve your product and align with your customers' expectations?

Improve Your User Experience with Real-Time

Only a few years ago words like WebSockets, low latency and real-time functionality were at the forefront of bleeding-edge development. Fast-forward a couple of years and this technology has become an integral part of many of our favourite apps: e.g. Facebook with its in-app notifications, or Uber with its real-time location tracking effect.

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How To Make A Physiology-Friendly Application For The iPad

If you’ve ever had to move your iPad from one hand to the other just to tap a button you couldn’t reach, then you may have already guessed why we began this study in our UX lab.

How To Make A Physiology-Friendly Application For The iPad

Our Mail.Ru Group’s UX lab team carries out many usability studies of our apps for smartphones and tablets. We address users’ needs by introducing features in our products. We carefully test all of the functions to ensure users notice and understand them well. Nevertheless, this was the first time we had looked at the physiological aspect of our app’s usage.

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How To Integrate Motion Design In The UX Workflow

As UX professionals, we play a key role in raising the bar for customer experiences. A simple attention to detail is often what signals to the customer that we’re thinking about them. In the digital space, we focus on user interactions within applications devices and processes.

Motion Design In The UX Workflow

With the ever-increasing computing power of desktops, browser sophistication and use of native apps, every day we learn of new ways to push the limits of what defines a well-crafted UI. When used correctly, motion can be a key utility in helping your users achieve their goals.

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Legal Guidelines For The Use Of Location Data On The Web

Location-based services are growing in popularity every day, and beacon-based services are tipped to be the advertising goldmine of 2016. You may already be using location data and beacons to enhance your users’ experience with your websites, apps and wearables. However, the use of location data is not without limits.

A simple opt-in screen

Developers must become aware of international privacy laws, as well as industry codes of self-regulation, that govern its usage. Following laws and codes, while also adhering to best practice principles through frameworks such as privacy by design (PbD), will ensure public trust in your app as well as in your services as a developer.

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Why Passphrases Are More User-Friendly Than Passwords

A user’s account on a website is like a house. The password is the key, and logging in is like walking through the front door. When a user can’t remember their password, it’s like losing their keys. When a user’s account is hacked, it’s like their house is getting broken into.

Why Passphrases Are More User-Friendly Than Passwords

Nearly half of Americans (47%) have had their account hacked in the last year alone. Are web designers and developers taking enough measures to prevent these problems? Or do we need to rethink passwords?

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Takeaways From Mobile Web Behavior

According to Ian Carrington, Google’s mobile and social advertising sales director, speaking at Mobile Marketing Live back in 2012, more people in the world have access to a smartphone than a toothbrush.

Takeaways From Mobile Web Behavior

With that in mind, it’s perhaps not very surprising that there’s no shortage of information about how people interact with websites on mobile. From specific usability testing and scrutiny of Google Analytics data to more generalized but larger-scale projects, we can quite easily gain access to statistics that illustrate how users interact with our websites.

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What You Need To Know About Anticipatory Design

The word anticipatory comes from the Latin anticipare, which means "taking care of ahead of time." We normally associate it with something that happens, is performed or felt in anticipation of something.

What You Need To Know About Anticipatory Design

In a way, most products contain at least one element of anticipation. Aaron Shapiro from HUGE defined anticipatory design as a method where it’s up to the designer to simplify processes as much as possible for users, minimizing difficulty by making decisions on their behalf.

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Notes On Client-Rendered Accessibility

As creators of the web, we bring innovative, well-designed interfaces to life. We find satisfaction in improving our craft with each design or line of code. But this push to elevate our skills can be self-serving: Does a new CSS framework or JavaScript abstraction pattern serve our users or us as developers?

Notes On Client-Rendered Accessibility

If a framework encourages best practices in development while also improving our workflow, it might serve both our users’ needs and ours as developers. If it encourages best practices in accessibility alongside other areas, like performance, then it has potential to improve the state of the web. Despite our pursuit to do a better job every day, sometimes we forget about accessibility, the practice of designing and developing in a way that’s inclusive of people with disabilities.

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Thinking Like An App Designer

There’s more to designing mobile apps than meets the eye. The task requires a deep knowledge of devices, and it often means changing the way we think — even if that means leaving behind much of what we’ve learned from designing for the web.

Thinking Like An App Designer

I started my career like many designers: working on print design projects. Shortly thereafter, I discovered the world of websites, which fascinated me and became the focus of my work for some time. Along the way I learned concepts related to interaction design and user experience, which I hardly knew existed until then.

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