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Posts Tagged ‘WebP’.

We are pleased to present below all posts tagged with ‘WebP’.

Using WebP Image Format Today

They say a picture is worth a thousand words. But online, a picture can be worth a thousand kilobytes or more! HTTP Archive shows that images make up 64% of a web page’s total size on average. Given this, image optimization is key, especially considering that many users will abandon a request if it doesn’t load within a few seconds.

WebP Images And Performance

The problem with image optimization is that we want to keep file sizes small without sacrificing quality. Past attempts to create file types that optimize images better than the standard JPEG, PNG and GIF formats have been unsuccessful.

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Responsive Images Done Right: A Guide To <picture> And srcset

On Monday, we published an article on Picturefill 2.0, a perfect polyfill for responsive images. Today's article complements Tim Wright's article and explains exactly how we can use the upcoming <picture> element and srcset, with simple fallbacks for legacy browsers. There is no reason to wait for responsive images; we can actually have them very, very soon. — Ed.

Responsive Images Done Right: A Guide To <picture> And srcset

Images are some of the most important pieces of information on the web, but over the web’s 25-year history, they haven’t been very adaptable at all. Everything about them has been stubbornly fixed: their size, format and crop, all set in stone by a single src.

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Keeping The Big <picture> Small How To Avoid Duplicate Downloads In Responsive Images

The <picture> element is a new addition to HTML5 that’s being championed by the W3C’s Responsive Images Community Group (RICG). It is intended to provide a declarative, markup-based solution to enable responsive images without the need of JavaScript libraries or complicated server-side detection.

How To Avoid Duplicate Downloads In Responsive Images

The <picture> element supports a number of different types of fallback content, but the current implementation of these fallbacks is problematic. In this article, we’ll explore how the fallbacks work, how they fail and what can be done about it.

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